Xcode Update 600% CPU

Discussion in 'macOS' started by charlieegan3, Sep 25, 2013.

  1. charlieegan3 macrumors 68020

    charlieegan3

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2012
    Location:
    U.K
    #1
    I finally got round to updating the Xcode iOS7 update. My Macbook was running pretty hot and the cpu for 'installd' was at times over 700%.

    I know that computers can handle this heat, I know that it now done and I don't need to fuss. I'm just interested as to why this is the most demanding task I've ever witnessed in activity monitor. Any ideas?
     

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  2. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #2
    This thread has a good explanation.

    It has something to compile the current list of software installed on your computer, and compare with the current version list recieved from Apple's servers.
     
  3. charlieegan3 thread starter macrumors 68020

    charlieegan3

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2012
    Location:
    U.K
    #3
    Cheers - that is a good explanation.

    For reference:
    This is a daemon is part of PackageKit framework, in other words it is just the background process for the "Software Update" GUI application. E.g. if you open the Software Update application and check for updates, take a look at the Activity Monitor--you'll see the "installd" process doing a bunch of work.

    The reason it pegs your CPU is because it must compile the current list of software installed on your computer, and compare with the current version list recieved from Apple's servers.

    You can set the frequency of Software Update checks in System Preferences -> Software Update.

    The default settings are to both "Check for updates" AND "Download updates automatically". You may adjust either setting, but I would not recommend turning it of alltogether.

    There's nothing wicked about this process - it's just set to download updates.

    You can solve your CPU problem by lowering the priority of the process or by just killing the process in Activity Monitor.
     

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