iOS Xcode

zedchigo

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jun 7, 2012
2
0
Hello!
I just got my MBP, and Xcode
This is my first time, but yeah
Okay to my point:

Since I have been 7 years old, I wanted to be a App/Game/Program developer!
That's why I just got Xcode, but yeah I want to start learning!
I have no idea what a good video, or a PDF tutorial will be,
so would anyone be so kind to find me a youtube video(s), or PDF File(s)
(I preffere PDF documents)
to getting started?

Thanks!
 

GoCubsGo

macrumors Nehalem
Feb 19, 2005
35,753
146
I saw this in another thread, evidently iTunes-U has tutorials. Try that.
 

ArtOfWarfare

macrumors G3
Nov 26, 2007
8,606
4,084
What prior programming experience do you have?

If the answer is "none", then you're getting a bit ahead of yourself. Learn the basics of C first. Many other's here endorse a variety of books. I, being a student already $30K in debt, instead endorse the free ebook, Learn C The Hard Way.

Check it out here:
http://c.learncodethehardway.org/book/

You don't need to learn everything in the book to move onto learning how to program for the iPhone / Mac, but I suggest going through the first... 17 chapters (up through "Exercise 16: Structs and Pointers to Them". If you get lost during chapters 16 or 17, that's okay... You'll need to understand them eventually, but you can learn through experience while learning how to program the iPhone.

Learning that much C will take you 20-100 hours of reading, writing, studying, and exercising. (The 20 hours is only realistic if you already have other programming experience. It'll take closer to 80 minimum if you have none. So expect it to take between 2 weeks and 2 months, depending on how much time/day you can dedicate to it.)

After you learn that much C, move into the developing for iOS courses offered by Stanford via iTunes U for free. Expect that to take 1-3 months.

Oh, if you're planning on doing 3D games, I'll also tell you a little more: Don't bother with OpenGL. Learning that is a world of pain. I suggest instead learning Ogre 3D: www.ogre3d.org

But before you learn that, you'll need to learn C++ (IDK any good sources for C++; I learned it in school...) and before you learn C++, you'll need a more solid grasp of C, which means you'll need to make it through the first ~35 chapters of Learn C The Hard way.

Oh, and I'll just throw this out too while I'm at it: if you want to make your own 3D game, with your own models and stuff, you'll likely want to learn Blender and GIMP, too.

So... Yeah. Being able to make your own app or game involves learning a lot. Students go into summer break thinking they'll come out the other end having made a game... But more realistically, they'll probably only learn enough for how to make their game.
 

OldSchoolMacGuy

Suspended
Jul 10, 2008
4,197
9,050
Both Stanford and MIT have some good, free, online courses available.
Problem is that the course from Stanford and MIT both require that you have a background in some type of programming language before taking their course. The Stanford course is CS106B but one would need knowledge from CS106A also along with some previous higher level programming language.

I'd suggest checking out Codecademy.com It's a free online way to learn programming. Then take the iTunes U course afterwards.

The other issue with the iTunes U course is that it's from 2009. Xcode has changed a LOT with the release of Xcode 4. You will find that it looks nothing like version 3 that they're using for the course. Although it does cost money, I'd recommend Lynda.com iOS SDK Essential Training which was just updated in March 2012 so it uses Xcode 4 and the examples are much easier to follow. Additionally it's a more complete training with more hands on work than the iTunes U which is just a video training (Lynda.com provides exercise files to work along with the training videos, etc).
 

ScoobyMcDoo

macrumors 65816
Nov 26, 2007
1,189
34
Austin, TX
Problem is that the course from Stanford and MIT both require that you have a background in some type of programming language before taking their course. The Stanford course is CS106B but one would need knowledge from CS106A also along with some previous higher level programming language.
CS106A is also available. It's perquisites are as follows:

Prerequisites: The course requires no previous background in programming, but does require considerable dedication and hard work
 

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