XP vs Vista?

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by t19880821, Sep 3, 2008.

  1. t19880821 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2008
    #1
    I know it's been discussed before, but the info that I've found on it are pretty old and now Vista has new drivers and such. I'm going to use boot camp solely for gaming (since that's all Windows is really good for). I have the MBP 2.4ghz, 2gb ram, 256mb geforce 8600m GT.

    If you guys can give your opinions, or share your knowledge on this subject I'd be really grateful. I'm looking for which one has better performance in gaming, XP or Vista... and if so, by how much?
     
  2. pwn247 macrumors 6502

    pwn247

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    Aug 30, 2008
    Location:
    West Virginia, USA
    #2
    I've seen lacking performance, especially with games, in Windows Vista. You should consider trying both on your MacBook Pro before choosing the prime "gaming OS". Personally, I get better framerate in XP than with Vista- but, of course, it varies on many systems. Computers with more memory (or RAM) typically don't have problems running Vista under high-CPU/GPU intensive tasks.
     
  3. dvince2 macrumors 6502

    dvince2

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    Mar 6, 2007
    Location:
    Canada
    #3
    I'm running Vista on my CD Macbook, but not for games (need it for school). It's (and please don't shoot me for this!!!!) a pretty decent OS with some really nice features over XP. BUT, XP ran on my macbook using about 50mb of ram while idle. Vista runs on at least 400mb, usually 600mb.
    If you need that power for games, I'd go with XP.
     
  4. CWallace macrumors 601

    CWallace

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    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    #4
    I've used both XP x32 and Vista x64 and I find XP to be quicker on my MBP.

    XP also takes up a good deal less HDD space, so if all you want to do is play games, you're likely better off sticking with XP. The only caveat is if your video card and games use DirectX 10 - that technology is Vista, only. However, Apple doesn't ship high-end graphics cards with their PCs, so even if the card and game use DX10, you might want to run it in DX9 mode for performance.
     
  5. t19880821 thread starter macrumors regular

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    Sep 1, 2008
    #5
    Thanks for the replies, guys.

    I noticed you guys said it takes a lot of ram. I read somewhere that Vista also uses a lot of the GPU power.. and truth to this?

    Another thing.. I noticed that Windows XP SP3 is out. Now, if I buy Windows XP now will it still come with SP2 or will it be SP3? And if it's SP3, how can I prepare my MBP for it, because I noticed that you need Boot Camp 2.1 for SP3 and the upgrades I saw are only for XP or Vista.. is there anyway to do it PRE-install of Windows?

    Again, thanks for all the help. We've had a Mac for a year, but I've never really gotten into it until now.
     
  6. The Flashing Fi macrumors 6502a

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    Sep 23, 2007
    #6

    Mac OS X also uses a lot of the GPU power for on-screen rendering. In XP, your CPU handles the on-screen "rendering." In Vista, your GPU does. However, when you play a game, Aero is disabled leaving you in the "basic" mode, which uses the same rendering XP uses. When you exit the game, automatically will go back to Aero. Aero doesn't cause a performance hit in games (since it is disabled in games).
     
  7. jeffuwee macrumors member

    jeffuwee

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    Aug 31, 2008
    #7
    I'm pretty sure that they only sell xp with sp2 and you have to upgrade to sp3 manually. But I'm not sure. I'm still running sp2.
     
  8. The Flashing Fi macrumors 6502a

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    Sep 23, 2007
    #8
    You can get SP2 or SP3 CDs.
     
  9. jeffuwee macrumors member

    jeffuwee

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    Aug 31, 2008
    #9
    oh I didn't know that the ones I saw said sp2 dam lol
     
  10. t19880821 thread starter macrumors regular

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    Sep 1, 2008
    #10
    So there's no way to prepare mac osx for sp3?
     
  11. CWallace macrumors 601

    CWallace

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    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    #11
    You can take an original XP SP2 install disc, copy the contents to your HDD and then slipstream SP3 into it. You then burn the slipstreamed copy to a CD-R and install from that. Plenty of articles on how to do so via a Google search.
     
  12. TataTata07 macrumors newbie

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    Aug 2, 2008
    #12
    If you get a CD with SP2 on it, go ahead and install and then upgrade it to SP3 once you have all drivers and everything running on the MacBook.

    The changes between SP2 --> SP3 were mostly bug fixes (mainly because MS likes to do bug fixes in SP form and not through regular patches or software updates like mas os x) and requires no driver changes. While SP1 --> SP2 for XP required an update in the drivers for almost all the computers in our office.
     
  13. t19880821 thread starter macrumors regular

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    Sep 1, 2008
    #13
    My cousin says he can give me his copy of xp home sp2 oem. What's oem? Is that bad?
     
  14. TataTata07 macrumors newbie

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    Aug 2, 2008
    #14
    OEM
    Original equipment manufacturer

    It's the version Dell buys from MS or HP from MS. The biggest cost in software is usually the packaging and OEM you get a CD with a paper in a yellow envelope. You still need a license to run so I recommend looking at NewEgg.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832116515

    This one comes with SP3 already loaded onto the disc.
     
  15. The Flashing Fi macrumors 6502a

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    Sep 23, 2007
    #15
    MS puts bug fixes on Windows Update often. SPs often include all previous updates, and yes, some new updates and bux fixes, and sometimes new features. I also usually find that MS offers bug fixes more regularly than Mac OS X, since Apple likes group their bug fixes and updates for one "big" release every few months.

    The cost of the packaging is something like 5 bucks and does not account in the 100 dollar minimum difference between OEM and retail.

    The difference is purely the license.

    OEM allows you to install the copy on ONE computer and you CANNOT transfer the license from one computer to another. You can reinstall on the same computer as many times as you'd like.

    Retail allows you to install the copy on ONE computer at a time and you CAN transfer the license from one computer to another (you will need to erase the copy from one computer before putting it on another). Once again, you can reinstall as many times as you'd like.

    This is purely from what the EULA says and MS's stance on it. Breaking the EULA is your own prerogative.

    If he's using this copy on his computer or, if he has, in the past used the copy on his computer, technically, you cannot use it. If this copy is from a Dell, or HP, or some other computer, I suggest that you not use that CD, as:

    a) The CD checks the BIOS to ensure that the computer that it's being installed on is the one it's supposed to be installed on, so it may not even install to begin with.

    b) If it does work, it will likely have pre-installed drivers that will give you nothing but headaches and heartaches.
     
  16. Stridder44 macrumors 68040

    Stridder44

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    Mar 24, 2003
    Location:
    California
    #16
    I was in the same boat as you not long ago. I got a new MBP 2.5 Ghz and wanted to use Boot Camp solely for gaming. After upgrading to 4 GB of RAM (very cheap to do) and trying both XP and Vista, many times, I found Vista 64 to be the choice. Everything works fine with it (even 13 year old Oregon Trail) and the fps difference is nill; if anything Vista was faster.

    But a lot of people on this forum hate Vista just for funsies, so they'll probably tell you otherwise.
     
  17. jeffuwee macrumors member

    jeffuwee

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    Aug 31, 2008
    #17
    wow stridder that makes things pretty clear i guess. just curious but wherd you buy your ram? cause im planning to get a mbp soon after the upgrades and im going to have to buy some haha.
     
  18. Stridder44 macrumors 68040

    Stridder44

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    Mar 24, 2003
    Location:
    California
    #18
    Bought mine from a store called Fry's. Got 4 GB of Crucial for $79.90. You could probably find it cheaper online.
     
  19. pwn247 macrumors 6502

    pwn247

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    Location:
    West Virginia, USA
    #19
    Also check out NextWorld Computing, and NewEgg.com for RAM. ;)
     
  20. Dustman macrumors 65816

    Dustman

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2007
    #20
    Wrong. It will install plain ol' Windows, however it just wont activate. No special drivers or anything like that, those come on a different CD.

    That being said, you could always use that OEM for 30 days if it fails activation until you can find another cheap version on eBay or something.
     
  21. CWallace macrumors 601

    CWallace

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    #21
    In a nutshell...

    OEM-specific (HP, Dell, Gateway, etc.) versions of Windows XP do not perform a BIOS check. But they do use a certain license key pattern (with the license key on a sticker attached to the computer) and they do need to be activated.

    OEM-generic ("site license", "corporate" or "government") versions of Windows XP do not perform a BIOS check and they do not need to be activated. They use a single license key for all installations (no matter the number).

    OEM-specific versions of Windows Vista can perform a BIOS check so the user does not have to activate. By having a valid license key in that OEM's key pattern and the OEM's BIOS, Vista considers it a valid and licensed installation.

    OEM-generic versions of Windows Vista also use a single key like Windows XP. However, they must be activated and there is a limit to how many activations each key can do (usually tied to how many licenses have been purchased). Another option for large corporations is to have their own authentication servers which will verify that clients have a valid copy of Windows Vista.
     

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