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Earlier in August, Hulu announced that the company would be moving to a subscription-only model, gradually phasing out its free tier -- which let users watch the most recent episodes of shows after they aired live on TV -- over the subsequent weeks. Thanks to a partnership with Yahoo, Hulu's free service continues in a website and, recently launched by the company, a free iOS app called "Yahoo View."

The mobile app appears to be a noticeably tampered-down experience, however. According to TechCrunch, "due to streaming rights" the app only has short clips and trailers from well-known shows, late-night comedy, sports, and news programs, but it doesn't let users watch full-length TV episodes of anything besides certain anime series. The website version does offer full episodes, but users have to wait eight days after each episode originally airs live on TV for it to appear on Yahoo View.

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Featuring Hulu content, the Yahoo View app brings you thousands of clips on-the-go and lets you be the first to see the hottest videos. Watch the latest must-see clips in comedy, late night talk shows, celebrity & entertainment, news and movie trailers. Don't miss a single moment from your favorite TV shows like The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, Dancing With The Stars, The Voice, Law & Order: SVU, New Girl, Black-ish, Modern Family, Empire, Grey's Anatomy and many more.
The website version of Yahoo View also includes a "Beyond the Episode" feature that lets users navigate GIFs, previews, clips, and spoiler discussions for the episode they just watched, all content integrated with Tumblr, which the iOS app lacks.

The launch of Yahoo View on iOS coincides with an unfortunate news story surrounding the company, which is expected to soon confirm a "massive data breach" that is threatening the exposure of 200 million user accounts. The hack, which includes user credentials dating back to 2012, could potentially cause trouble for the $4.8 billion sale of Yahoo's core business to Verizon, announced over the summer.
But there's nothing smooth about this hack, said sources, which became known in August when an infamous cybercriminal named "Peace" said on a website that he was selling credentials of 200 million Yahoo users from 2012 on the dark web for just over $1,800. The data allegedly included user names, easily decrypted passwords, personal information like birth dates and other email addresses.
Although unconfirmed, a source speaking to Recode suggested the hack could target over 200 million user accounts, with the potential for more. "It's as bad as that," said one source. "Worse, really." The company has yet to call for a wide user password reset, but sources close to the matter believe that "Yahoo might have to, although it will be a case of too little, too late."

The Yahoo View app is available to download on the iOS App Store [Direct Link] for free, and an Android version is expected to launch sometime soon.

Article Link: 'Yahoo View' App Debuts With Hulu Content Amid 'Massive Data Breach' of Yahoo Services
 

vertical smile

macrumors 603
Sep 23, 2014
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The hack, which includes user credentials dating back to 2012,

What does this mean, if you have used a yahoo account since 2012, your data might have been compromised? Or if you have created an account since 2012, your data might have been compromised?

I have a yahoo account that I created in 2001 but I never use it anymore.

Although, I think about a decade ago, I changed all my personal information to the wrong stuff anyways when my ex-wife was trying to spy on my account by resetting my password using my information that she knew.

So, if someone has it, it is most likely is not correct information.
 
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stiligFox

macrumors 65816
Apr 24, 2009
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What does this mean, if you have used a yahoo account since 2012, your data might have been compromised? Or if you have created an account since 2012, your data might have been compromised?

I have a yahoo account that I created in 2001 but I never use it anymore.

Although, I think about a decade ago, I changed all my personal information to the wrong stuff anyways when my ex-wife was trying to spy on my account by resetting my password using my information that she knew.

So, if someone has it, it is most likely is not correct information.

From the severity of the breach, I almost take it to me the breach has been occurring since 2012...
 
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Sasparilla

macrumors 68000
Jul 6, 2012
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JMHO, but if you have a yahoo account, go change your pword now and change any of the verification data (if it allows you) to things people can't look up (document them) so people with access to this can't do an imposter pword change on you.

Be sure and change any other logins you have that use that same password (you're not supposed to share passwords between web sites / services, but people do) and might have this e-mail address tied to it because those are getting pounded on now.

Yahoo....(course this could and probably will happen to any of these firms with these honeypots of userID's etc.).
 
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Boatboy24

macrumors 65816
Nov 4, 2011
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I've been getting frequent emails from Yahoo lately telling me that a login was attempted from an unrecognized device. I have two Yahoo accounts and receive this notice on both of them almost every day.
 
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SFamilyRep

macrumors newbie
Oct 16, 2014
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I've been getting frequent emails from Yahoo lately telling me that a login was attempted from an unrecognized device. I have two Yahoo accounts and receive this notice on both of them almost every day.
Gotta that notification just this morning
 
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macduke

macrumors G4
Jun 27, 2007
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Central U.S.
I had a Yahoo account with a really stupid username way back in the day before I was old enough to have bank accounts or anything important. It has probably been deleted anyway. I still have older coworkers though who use Yahoo for everything. Better give them a heads up.
 
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nagromme

macrumors G5
May 2, 2002
12,546
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Friend of mine who is an avid photographer lost her email and Flickr—all her photos and albums and followers. Someone stole her password and changed it, and Yahoo would not/could not help. This was a few months ago, but it could well be the same 2012 breach.

Reminds me again to NEVER use the same password two places (good luck getting my friends/family to follow suit). And to favor companies that take security and privacy the most seriously.

I hope some form of Yahoo recovers. Flickr is a good product. I even like Yahoo mail (and thanfully have a post-2012 password and no suspicious login attempts so far).

Heck, Yahoo View even has its uses for me—I used to watch my network TV shows mainly on Hulu, and now it will be this!
 
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nutmac

macrumors 603
Mar 30, 2004
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The mobile app appears to be a noticeably tampered-down experience, however. According to TechCrunch, "due to streaming rights" the app only has short clips and trailers from well-known shows, late-night comedy, sports, and news programs, but it doesn't let users watch full-length TV episodes of anything besides certain anime series.

Tampered-down is putting it mildly. There's nothing of value to watch on the mobile app.
 
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MacSince1985

macrumors 6502
Oct 18, 2009
353
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I just changed my password. While in the security area, Yahoo recommended deleting the recovery questions. They're finally acknowledging that those easy-to-answer questions are a security risk.
 
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JosephAW

macrumors 68040
May 14, 2012
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we just bought something thru yahoo store and our card was hacked shortly thereafter.
Now we know where it came from.
 
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CrystalQuest76

Suspended
Dec 14, 2015
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West Cost A Lot
For various reasons in the past I felt compelled to create a Yahoo account. I created a unique User ID and Password. I then created unique answers to the standard security questions (a standard practice I perform). I entered those unique pieces of data into a database that I keep for these sorts of things.

I know using honest answers for my parent's names and schools and even my teachers' names and pets' names all exist in databases. that information can be compiled by someone can and then plug into a brute force attack. Or if the hacker gets the data from one service I use will not be able to use those data points in another attack with similar questions. Since my answers are unique for each service I use, data collection is much more challenging for a bad person. Of course I have serious problems if I loose that database. Just in case I have problems with the database, I export it all out as a tab deliminated PDF that i password protect.

Doing all those extra steps may sound paranoid, but as we keep seeing in the news there are hackers out to get us. I just don't take it personal and wear a tinfoil hat :).
 
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