You know you're an Architect when...

Genghis Khan

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Jun 3, 2007
1,202
0
Melbourne, Australia
You know you're an Architecture Student when...
1. ...the alarm clock tells you when to go to sleep.
2. ...you KNOW what Fevicol tastes like.
3. ...you CELEBRATE space and OBSERVE your birthday.
4. ...people get nauseous just by smelling your caffeine
5. ...you think it's possible to CREATE space.
6. ...you've slept more than 20 hours non-stop in a single weekend.
7. .you're brother or sister thinks he or she is an only child.
8. ...you're not seen in public.
9. ...you lose your house keys for a week and you don't even notice.
10. ...you've brushed your teeth and washed your hair in the school's washroom.
11. ...you've discovered the benefits of having none or very short hair. You've started to appreciate inheriting baldness.
12. ...you've used an entire role of film to photograph the sidewalk.
13. ...you always carry your deodorant.
14. ...you take notes and messages with a rapidograph and colour markers.
15. ...you see holidays only as extra sleeping time.
16. ...you've got more photographs of buildings than of actual people.
17. ...you've taken your girlfriend (boyfriend) on a date to a construction site.
18. ..you can live without human contact, food or daylight, but if you can't print, it's chaos.
19... when youre being shown pictures of a trip, you ask what the human scale is.
20. ...you can use Photoshop, Illustrator and make a web page, but you don't know how to use Excel.
21...you consider using broccoli for your models.
22...you consider 3AM an early night.
23...upon hearing 'supermodel', you think of a nicely crafted-foam core model.
24... you ask Santa Clause for architecture supplies.
25...Your four basic food groups are candy, caffeine, coffee, and pretzels.


I love these...there is a better one on facebook somewhere, but as i'm idealistically opposed to it, i am unable to find it

funny thing about this is that all of them are true :eek:
 

mrfrosty

macrumors 6502a
Oct 1, 2005
500
21
In my experience you know your dealing with an architect when

1. They can't draw a straight line.
2. They charge me for work they have got the office junior to do.
3. They can't measure a simple square.
4. They add on things we specifically say we don't want.
5. They don't understand how much things cost to build.
6. They can't stick to a budget.
7. They don't seem to understand simple planning regulations.
8. Everything takes 2 weeks.
 

ClassicBean

macrumors 6502a
Jun 20, 2004
642
2
Torontoland
In my experience you know your dealing with an architect when

1. They can't draw a straight line.
2. They charge me for work they have got the office junior to do.
3. They can't measure a simple square.
4. They add on things we specifically say we don't want.
5. They don't understand how much things cost to build.
6. They can't stick to a budget.
7. They don't seem to understand simple planning regulations.
8. Everything takes 2 weeks.
That was mean, yet brilliant. Well done, architect hater.
 

Genghis Khan

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Jun 3, 2007
1,202
0
Melbourne, Australia
oooh....i see we have either an engineer or a builder.........what you didn't say was that if the built world was left to those two occupations we'd be left living and working in perfectly rectangular spaces in perfectly rectangular houses

i don't want to get into an argument about who's right...

but let me say..

.i'm spending 5.5 years learning how to create spaces for people to live and work in, preferably putting a smile on their face...engineers/builders spend 3-4 years learning how to make a building stand up...so when an architect says they want unevenly spaced beams, engineers/builders go crazy....what they don't see is that the roof is going to have a window in it

anyway...thanks for dissing an entire occupation:)
 

adrianblaine

macrumors 65816
Oct 12, 2006
1,157
0
Pasadena, CA
oooh....i see we have either an engineer or a builder.........what you didn't say was that if the built world was left to those two occupations we'd be left living and working in perfectly rectangular spaces in perfectly rectangular houses

i don't want to get into an argument about who's right...

but let me say..

.i'm spending 5.5 years learning how to create spaces for people to live and work in, preferably putting a smile on their face...engineers/builders spend 3-4 years learning how to make a building stand up...so when an architect says they want unevenly spaced beams, engineers/builders go crazy....what they don't see is that the roof is going to have a window in it

anyway...thanks for dissing an entire occupation:)
In some ways I can understand why there are those that don't care for architects. In my last year in Architecture school, I read a lot of work by Christopher Alexander and he makes an argument that Architects over the last 50-60 years (I can't remember his exact words) have led the world into thinking they hold all the secrets to creating space. Architects tend to design buildings for their own ego and for the praise of other architects and architectural critics while ignoring the common people. The majority of people don't understand modern architecture, thus it has become a form of elitism.
 

mrfrosty

macrumors 6502a
Oct 1, 2005
500
21
oooh....i see we have either an engineer or a builder.........what you didn't say was that if the built world was left to those two occupations we'd be left living and working in perfectly rectangular spaces in perfectly rectangular houses

i don't want to get into an argument about who's right...

but let me say..

.i'm spending 5.5 years learning how to create spaces for people to live and work in, preferably putting a smile on their face...engineers/builders spend 3-4 years learning how to make a building stand up...so when an architect says they want unevenly spaced beams, engineers/builders go crazy....what they don't see is that the roof is going to have a window in it

anyway...thanks for dissing an entire occupation:)
No problems. Actually I'm neither of those things I'm just having a house designed by an architect. I'm amazed that it takes 5.5 years though that's about the same amount of time it takes to become a doctor !
 

Abstract

macrumors Penryn
Dec 27, 2002
24,378
110
Location Location Location
In some ways I can understand why there are those that don't care for architects. In my last year in Architecture school, I read a lot of work by Christopher Alexander and he makes an argument that Architects over the last 50-60 years (I can't remember his exact words) have led the world into thinking they hold all the secrets to creating space. Architects tend to design buildings for their own ego and for the praise of other architects and architectural critics while ignoring the common people. The majority of people don't understand modern architecture, thus it has become a form of elitism.
That all seems to be true. Sometimes, I look at a building and don't really know why it has to look so pretentious.

If you want to "create space", just make a building with transparent glass outer walls, and a non-rectangular shape. Add on a really odd shaped roof made of a shiny material, one with lots of unnecessary curves, and voila.......space. *cough* And when you walk in through the front door, you should be greeted by an unnecessarily large atrium that lets in lots of light (thanks again to the wonderful glass walls). Large atrium = space.
 

Genghis Khan

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Jun 3, 2007
1,202
0
Melbourne, Australia
@AdrianBlaine

i understand exactly what you mean...i think this can be attributed to the lack of skill and over supply of Architects...i don't know about you, but i look around my city and know all the buildings have been designed individually by an architect (i.e. not the flatppack suburbs), and i come close to tears...i sometimes think that very few architects these days know what they're doing

p.s. check out norman foster...he is a legend

@MrFosty

lol...yes it does take a long time at my uni (the others in australia take 3 years)...and if i want a dual degree in construction management it'll be 6.5 years...basically the people who i left in high school will all have started uni and half have finished before i get out :p (but hopefully i'll have three degrees)

@Abstract

i blame Frank Gehry *points at dartboard on the wall*

@ejb190

there are people called Landscape Architects...they study their own subjects :p

@Mr. Anderson

that's true...half of my time will be spend in studio classes

...speaking of which i should probably get back to that now :p
 

ErikCLDR

macrumors 68000
Jan 14, 2007
1,795
0
When you *forget* to put a support beam in the basement of my house, and then realize it needs one. In turn that somehow causes my door to stick in the winter, and rattle in warmer temps when someone opens the door to the garage on the complete opposite side of the house. I have no idea how that is related but thats what the builder says.
 

mactastic

macrumors 68040
Apr 24, 2003
3,647
661
Colly-fornia
Since we're cracking wise here:
A man is flying in a hot air balloon and realizes he is lost. He reduces height and spots a man down below. He lowers the balloon further and shouts:

"Excuse me, can you help me? I promised my friend I would meet him half an hour ago, but I don't know where I am."

The man below says: "Yes, you're in a large red hot air balloon, hovering 30 feet above this field between 40 & 41 degrees latitude and 120 and 124 degrees West longitude"

"You must be an architect" says the balloonist.

"I am" replies the man. "How did you know?"

"Well" says the balloonist, "everything you have told me is technically correct, but it's of absolutely no use to me and I still don't know where I am."

The man below says, "You must be a contractor."

"Well yes" replies the balloonist, "but how did you know?"

"Well", says the man below, "You don't know where you are, or where you're going and you've made a promise that you can't keep but now you expect me to solve your problem; and you're in the same position as you were before we met, but now it's my fault."
ErikCLDR said:
When you *forget* to put a support beam in the basement of my house, and then realize it needs one. In turn that somehow causes my door to stick in the winter, and rattle in warmer temps when someone opens the door to the garage on the complete opposite side of the house. I have no idea how that is related but thats what the builder says.
That's what contingency money is for. You did set aside contingency money, didn't you?

So is anyone else here practicing, or all students?
 

mactastic

macrumors 68040
Apr 24, 2003
3,647
661
Colly-fornia
Surely a beam that should have been there in the first place falls under the category of inadequate design? Typical f*cking architect! ;)
Of course it's inadequate design. The question is, who pays for what. Under the concept of added value, the owner is not paying any more than they should have, had the design been perfect from the get-go. If the project has progressed to the point where extra work is required to add the beam, then yes the Architect is responsible.

You can pay me to make "perfect" plans. Or you can put in a contingency, go with near-perfect plans, and get going a heck of a lot faster. Most clients would rather get a move on.
 

adrianblaine

macrumors 65816
Oct 12, 2006
1,157
0
Pasadena, CA
So is anyone else here practicing, or all students?
Not practicing quite yet. I just graduated in May and my wife and I just moved out here to the LA area. I'm not even sure if I want to pursue getting my license yet since I am torn between architecture and urban design. While where I'll be working does both, I want to wait and see if I significantly enjoy one over the other.
 

skunk

macrumors G4
Jun 29, 2002
11,745
4,006
Republic of Ukistan
You can pay me to make "perfect" plans. Or you can put in a contingency, go with near-perfect plans, and get going a heck of a lot faster. Most clients would rather get a move on.
So it's the Client's fault now, is it? Remind me when I'm driving my car and a wheel falls off at 70mph that it was "near-perfect". You crack me up. :D
 

Roger1

macrumors 65816
Jun 3, 2002
1,152
0
Michigan
So it's the Client's fault now, is it? Remind me when I'm driving my car and a wheel falls off at 70mph that it was "near-perfect". You crack me up. :D
If you buy the expensive wheels, they won't fall off. But it will take them a month to put a set on your car, rather than an afternoon.

:D
 

mactastic

macrumors 68040
Apr 24, 2003
3,647
661
Colly-fornia
Not practicing quite yet. I just graduated in May and my wife and I just moved out here to the LA area. I'm not even sure if I want to pursue getting my license yet since I am torn between architecture and urban design. While where I'll be working does both, I want to wait and see if I significantly enjoy one over the other.
Sounds like you're practicing to me. Hope you're ready to be a CAD monkey for a while! No better way to learn the ropes than to put together a set of con docs. Except of course, to deal with the fallout of building off those con docs.

If you are going to pursue a license, make sure you start the process early. Your CIDP/IDP fee can be payed in parts, $100 up front and the remaining $185 later on, if you register with NCARB within six months of graduation. Of course you'll need to come up with the $100 for CAB as well. But it beats having to shell it all out at once like I'm having to do now. It's a good idea to have the IDP checklist handy so you can start setting aside work samples as you go. You'll have 5 years to pass the AREs. I'd do it no matter which path I was going down. You never know when you'll want to do a little work on the side, and it doesn't hurt to have people who understand the ins and outs of architecture doing planning work. It surely won't hurt your employment chances later in life either.

Also make sure that you get your employment verification forms filled out regularly (review time is always good) and turned in to the CAB.

I'll probably have some ARE study material coming available in the next year... ;)

So it's the Client's fault now, is it? Remind me when I'm driving my car and a wheel falls off at 70mph that it was "near-perfect". You crack me up. :D
Cars are very different from buildings and you know it. Cars are perfected by repeatedly building prototypes. Buildings are always one-offs. That means there are problems with every set of drawings. Have you ever known a job that didn't require as-builts because of some unanticipated issue?

I'm not saying it's the client's fault that something was omitted. It's certainly the responsibility of the Architect to produce accurate construction drawings. I'm pointing out the reason clients don't pay architects to do perfect drawings. It could be done of course, but it would require prototypes that I doubt the average client wants to pay for. And I'm telling you the reality of a legal decision regarding a situation involving such an omission. Contingencies exist for just such reasons.

Besides, I'm just gonna turn around and take it out of the hide of my structural engineer. ;)

Practice makes "near-perfect", it seems.

I design and build, does that count? Means I don't get much mileage out of blaming the Architect, though...
You're close. I was specifically asking about practicing architecture though. It seems like we've got several students, but no licensed Architects.

Besides, residential barely counts. You can practically build an entire estate off the back of a napkin. What, like 3 structural sheets? Oh no! Help, it's getting complicated! :D