You're Welcome (?)

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by citizenzen, May 2, 2010.

  1. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    Mar 22, 2010
    #1
    "You're Welcome"

    I posted this phrase today and afterward wondered about its origins. It turns out that it wasn't popularized until the twentieth century. I searched to find what people said before "You're welcome" became popular but haven't found anything yet. Is there anybody here who could enlighten me?

    Thank you.
     
  2. ethical macrumors 68000

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    #2
    I don't think we have any members who are 110 years old
     
  3. MrCheeto macrumors 68030

    MrCheeto

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    #3
    What do we say besides, "you're welcome?"

    Depending on the situation, you may say, "it's no bother," "my pleasure," "happy to oblige."

    "You're welcome" just became a quick response to eliminate the need to specifically think of a response to, "thank you."

    How do you respond to, "how are you doing?" More than likely, you mindlessly say, "fine" and the other person doesn't have genuine interest in how you're doing.
     
  4. citizenzen thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #4
    It's no shorter than "it's no bother," "my pleasure," "happy to oblige."

    I was reading a blog complaining how "you're welcome" was being usurped by "no problem"... as if "you're welcome" held some sacred place in the English language.

    Now I find it's just a Johnny-come-lately.
     
  5. r1ch4rd macrumors 6502a

    r1ch4rd

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  6. MrCheeto macrumors 68030

    MrCheeto

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    #6
    What I'm saying is, it takes no time to just say, "you're welcome." It fits every situation, you don't have to actually choose a response.
     
  7. Peterkro macrumors 68020

    Peterkro

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    #7
    You may have been in intimate contact with an Antipodean.


    De rien
     
  8. citizenzen thread starter macrumors 65816

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    Mar 22, 2010
    #8
    I'm going to try to come up with something new.

    "You're welcome" is just so... weird.

    Any ideas?
     
  9. r1ch4rd macrumors 6502a

    r1ch4rd

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  10. -aggie- macrumors P6

    -aggie-

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    #10
    Aaight. (southern for all right).

    Back at ya'.

    Fuhgetaboutit.
     
  11. Decrepit macrumors 65816

    Decrepit

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    #11
    I asked my Russian teacher one day what the translation was for "you're welcome."

    She replied, (paraphrasing) "Only smug westerners would say something like that like you did something great. If somebody thanks you, that's enough. No need to extend the conversation by getting the last word in."

    So that's one person's opinion.

    I usually just say "you bet", "no problem" or "no worries."
     
  12. JNB macrumors 604

    JNB

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    #12
    What on earth is so weird about it? Of all the phrases that have murky etymology, that has to be among the most plainly obvious and apparent, considering the word welcome dates to antiquity (it appears in Beowulf), and has been in use—well, several uses and intents—since somewhere between the 8th & 12th centuries…

    "Thank you (for x)."

    "You are welcome (to x)."

    As a specific phrase, you're talking about something that dates a wee bit further back than a century here:

    Lodovico: "Madam, good night; I humbly thank your ladyship."
    Desdemona: "Your honour is most welcome."

    Othello, 1603
    Wm. Shakespeare
     
  13. citizenzen thread starter macrumors 65816

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    Mar 22, 2010
    #13
    What's weird about it is that it's not a direct, clear response to the initial statement.


    Think about it...

    "Thank you for helping me across the street."

    "It (helping you) was my pleasure."​


    While "You're welcome" takes a roundabout way to say it...

    "Thank you for helping me across the street."

    "You are welcome to ask for my assistance (helping you) any time."​


    It's far less straight forward... not to mention that many people mistakenly think it's "Your welcome."

    What does THAT even mean?
     
  14. SilentPanda Moderator emeritus

    SilentPanda

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    #14
    100 some years ago you just tipped your cowboy hat and spit on the ground. :D
     
  15. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #15
    Thats incorrect, Пожалуйста is often used as please and you're welcome in Russian.
     
  16. Decrepit macrumors 65816

    Decrepit

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    #16
    I remember the please part for sure.

    But she sure teed off on the "thank you" bit.

    Cnaciba. <-- my best shot at saying that without a Cyrillic keyboard. :D
     
  17. dukebound85 macrumors P6

    dukebound85

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    #17
    I like this
     
  18. citizenzen thread starter macrumors 65816

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    Mar 22, 2010
    #18

    SNAW-see-bah?

    snaw-SEE-bah?

    snaw-see-BAH?


    Don't forget to grab your crotch.

    You don't want to be impolite.
     
  19. MrCheeto macrumors 68030

    MrCheeto

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    #19
    Shhh, cyrillic letters don't have the same phonetic properties as our own ;)
     
  20. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #20
    spaw-see-bah

    pazahlsta
     
  21. TheSVD macrumors 6502a

    TheSVD

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    #21
    haaahahaha :D
     
  22. Gregg2 macrumors 603

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  23. Queso macrumors G4

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    #23
    "De res" is my current favourite. It means both "it's nothing" and "it's something" simultaneously. How good is that? :cool:
     
  24. H00513R macrumors 6502a

    H00513R

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    #24

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