185 GB Hard Drive Acceptable For 200 GB model?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by MacConvert2007, May 23, 2007.

  1. MacConvert2007 macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2007
    #1
    Hello,
    Got my first Mac yesterday. It is the black Macbook, and I paid for the 200 GB hard drive.

    However, when I open the drive and select "Get Info" the maximum capacity of the hard drive reads as 185.99 GB. Is this an acceptable range of variation for a drive that should be 200 GB?

    What should I do?

    Thanks in advance. :)
     
  2. psychofreak Retired

    psychofreak

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  3. x Shadow Dragon macrumors regular

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    May 21, 2007
    #3

    its because the operating system and stuff like that which takes up memory
     
  4. zioxide macrumors 603

    zioxide

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    #4
    fixed (i think)
     
  5. yetieater macrumors regular

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    USA
    #5
    Some math to ease your qualms:

    1 gigabyte is defined as 1,000,000,000 bytes. 10^9
    Therefore, 200GB is 200*10^9 bytes
    One kilobyte is defined as 1024 bytes, so your 200GB harddrive has 195312500 KB.
    One megabyte is defined as 1024 kilobytes - dividing by 1024 yields 190734.86328125 megabytes.
    One gigabyte is strictly defined as 1024 megabytes - dividing by 1024 yet again yields 186.264514923095703125 gigabytes.

    No problem.
     
  6. zioxide macrumors 603

    zioxide

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    #6
    Yes, and the hard drive companies base their measurements by saying there are 1000 megabytes in a gigabyte, so that's where the difference is.
     
  7. x Shadow Dragon macrumors regular

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    #7
    wait seriouslY???? thats such a rip-off can anyone say false-advertising
     
  8. SC68Cal macrumors 68000

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  9. yetieater macrumors regular

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    #9
    Read the fine print on any computer company's product pages. You get what you paid for.

    http://www.apple.com/macbook/specs.html

    See note one at the very bottom of the page.
     
  10. psychofreak Retired

    psychofreak

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    #10
    What on earth are Gibibytes?
     
  11. yetieater macrumors regular

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    #11
    /me lols
     
  12. leprechaun8942 macrumors member

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    May 15, 2007
    #12
    I was wondering wtf was going on with my 2gb nano when it said it had 1.83gb of space when it was brand new.
     
  13. gauchogolfer macrumors 603

    gauchogolfer

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    #13
    Take it easy, nerd-a-licious.

    To the point, a Gibibyte is what some people are proposing as a way to refer to disc capacity in a way that removes the 1024 vs. 1000 byte kilobyte discrepancy, which is at the root of the confusion.

    Wiki
     
  14. roker macrumors regular

    roker

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    New Zealand
    #14
    Just out of interest, why 1024? ie what determines that this must be 1024, rather than 1042, or 1234? Or, to make life easier, 1000? :confused:
    You do feel a bit ripped off when you by a 320gb hard drive, and only get 299Gbs :rolleyes: .
     
  15. dukebound85 macrumors P6

    dukebound85

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    #15
    has to do with bits which can only read 2 states, a 0 and a 1. thus 2^10 is called a kilobyte =1024 bits
    computers deal in a binary system so everything is 2^x

    heres a link that supports this

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilobyte
     
  16. Counterfit macrumors G3

    Counterfit

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    #16
    Because 1024 is 2^10. Much easier for something that uses binary to deal with than 1000 (10^3)
     
  17. ef651100 macrumors newbie

    ef651100

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    Mar 22, 2007
    #17
    1 byte = 8 bits.

    Data are stored as bytes, not bits.

    Addresses (locations) in computer are addressed by address line - basically a bunch of wires which can be turned either on or off.

    Say we have 8 wires.

    By using different combinations of on's and off's you can get 2^8 combinations in total. That's 256. Thus this gives this simple computer 256 addressable bytes.

    That has to do with RAM, but harddrives are similar.

    Kilo means 1000, but in computer-world, 2^x is a better interpretation of units (like the example of addresses). 2^10 is the closest they can get to 1000, thus it is chosen to be computer's meaning of "Kilo".
     
  18. gnasher729 macrumors P6

    gnasher729

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    Nov 25, 2005
    #18
    Check out the MacRumors guide about Gigabytes and stuff.

    If you look carefully in the Apple advertisements, you will see they say explicitely "1 GB = 1 billion bytes". The operating system, on the other hand, calculates 1 GB = 1024 x 1024 x 1024 bytes. If you multiply 185.99 times 1024 x 1024 x 1024, you will get quite exactly 200 billion bytes.
     
  19. ReanimationLP macrumors 68030

    ReanimationLP

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    #19
    185 is about right for 200. My 250s format under NTFS to 232 GB, so I'd say the 185 is pretty accurate.
     
  20. adiosk8 macrumors regular

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    Oct 20, 2006
    #20
    its 200 gigs unformatted and 185 formatted. Thats how drives always are. Applies to all hard drives. The larger it is, the more space you "give up".
     
  21. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #21
    This would make a great lolcat. :)
     
  22. damir.hara macrumors newbie

    damir.hara

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    #22
    Its fine, no worries.
     
  23. stoid macrumors 601

    stoid

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    #23
    Quite plainly, you couldn't have made a more inaccurate statement. Read the real explanation that has already been given about 6 times in this thread alone, not to mention hundreds (if not thousands) of times on this forum before you spout such disinformation! :p
     
  24. cube macrumors G5

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    May 10, 2004
    #24
    The prefix giga means 1,000,000,000

    So the correct meaning of gigabyte is 1,000,000,000 bytes.

    If you want to say 2^30 bytes, use gibibyte.

    Apple is wrong in not updating their notation in the GUIs (not for command-line programs, as changing that could break scripts, and geeks have no problem reading man pages to see what it is meant).
     
  25. unixfool macrumors 6502a

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    #25
    But not all Mac users are geeks and most won't even know what a man page is.
     

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