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Apr 12, 2001
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Apple supplier Foxconn is rushing to hire 200,000 more workers by the end of September to manufacture the iPhone 13 models, according to the South China Morning Post.

Foxconn-Office-FT.jpg

The 200,000 additional workers are needed at the world's biggest iPhone factory in the Chinese city of Zhengzhou, ahead of the expected launch of the iPhone 13 lineup next month. Hiring enough manpower has been the "biggest bottleneck" to production at the manufacturing facility, according to the site's deputy general manager, Wang Xue, who was quoted by a local broadcaster. Earlier this month, it was reported that Foxconn was struggling to hire enough workers for iPhone 13 production.

The staffing goal is reportedly being supported by local governments, which have provided 100 busses to "pick up job applicants from their communities and drop them at the factory gates." Foxconn believes that it will be able to hire 200,000 new hires by the end of September "at the current speed of recruitment." Once hired, new workers will be fast-tracked into their position.

The Zhengzhou factory can accommodate as many as 350,000 assembly line workers and manufacture up to 500,000 new iPhones every day. The current hiring push seeks to combat ramped-up production for the ‌iPhone 13‌ models, which are believed to be on track for launch late next month.

Article Link: 200,000 More Workers Needed to Manufacture iPhone 13 Ahead of Launch
 
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Markiie

macrumors 6502
Oct 10, 2011
473
213
Los Angeles, California.
Been following Apple launches for a long time......for some reason this one feels quite different. I've never heard Apple really pushing for mass production like this. Is there a super key feature outside 120hz that they feel will make it sell like crazy?
 

xxray

macrumors 68000
Jul 27, 2013
1,797
4,079
Been following Apple launches for a long time......for some reason this one feels quite different. I've never heard Apple really pushing for mass production like this. Is there a super key feature outside 120hz that they feel will make it sell like crazy?
That’s what I’ve been wondering. Why is Apple so sure these are going to sell like crazy?
 

velocityg4

macrumors 603
Dec 19, 2004
6,416
3,393
Georgia
A lot more hand assembly must go on than I’d expect. Down to many of the components. As 500,000 iPhones per day for 350,000 workers sounds quite low otherwise.
 

Glideslope

macrumors 604
Dec 7, 2007
7,064
4,351
The Adirondacks.
I’m surprised there are no comments “Cancel enhanced unemployment benefits in China and they will have plenty to hire.” 😂

Welcome to the new Global Employment Reality. Millions have moved on to other jobs and will never work in a large production site or service “essential” sector type position again.

They have used the past 18m to retrain and enter new sectors permanently mostly working from home.

2m after the enhanced benefits expire in the US the Service Sectors will be in no better shape in the US either. Lots of pain ahead.
 
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citysnaps

macrumors G3
Oct 10, 2011
8,118
14,167
San Francisco
And that's why Apple is not able to manufacture iPhones in the United States. Foxconn can quickly ramp up and down as Apple's manufacturing needs turn on a dime over the life of an iPhone model. That kind of quick reaction manufacturing ability and infrastructure simply does not exist in the US.
 

Xtir

macrumors regular
Jul 18, 2021
133
180
Been following Apple launches for a long time......for some reason this one feels quite different. I've never heard Apple really pushing for mass production like this. Is there a super key feature outside 120hz that they feel will make it sell like crazy?
It's also a phone..
 

Xtir

macrumors regular
Jul 18, 2021
133
180
And that's why Apple is not able to manufacture iPhones in the United States. Foxconn can quickly ramp up and down as Apple's manufacturing needs turn on a dime over the life of an iPhone model. That kind of quick reaction manufacturing ability and infrastructure simply does not exist in the US.
And the reason being? Americans are not flexible? do not work around the clock? are opinionated? love their family too much? have holidays? are ..?
 

Vjosullivan

macrumors 65816
Oct 21, 2013
1,083
1,276
And that's why Apple is not able to manufacture iPhones in the United States. Foxconn can quickly ramp up and down as Apple's manufacturing needs turn on a dime over the life of an iPhone model. That kind of quick reaction manufacturing ability and infrastructure simply does not exist in the US.
Which is a good thing. Very few people want to be "hire and fire" employees, whose jobs come and go at the whim of a marketing forecast or an advertising campaign. Particularly when they're doing it to hundreds of thousands of people at a time. On the other hand; it's great for multinational corporations who want to maximise profits with minimum commitment to their employees.

Personally, I favour happy people over happy abstract legal entities.
 

IIGS User

macrumors 6502a
Feb 24, 2019
619
1,630
And that's why Apple is not able to manufacture iPhones in the United States. Foxconn can quickly ramp up and down as Apple's manufacturing needs turn on a dime over the life of an iPhone model. That kind of quick reaction manufacturing ability and infrastructure simply does not exist in the US.
burns1.jpg


Likes the cut of your jib, son. Are you looking for a position in upper middle management?
 

ghostface147

macrumors 68040
May 28, 2008
3,622
3,796
And that's why Apple is not able to manufacture iPhones in the United States. Foxconn can quickly ramp up and down as Apple's manufacturing needs turn on a dime over the life of an iPhone model. That kind of quick reaction manufacturing ability and infrastructure simply does not exist in the US.
And on top of that, health insurance, 401k and they’d want at least $20 an hour.
 

Mick-Mac

macrumors 6502
Oct 24, 2011
358
853
Wow - you couldn't mobilize an on-demand work force that big in the US if your life depended on it.
 
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Abazigal

Contributor
Jul 18, 2011
15,237
14,567
Singapore
Been following Apple launches for a long time......for some reason this one feels quite different. I've never heard Apple really pushing for mass production like this. Is there a super key feature outside 120hz that they feel will make it sell like crazy?
The line from this article intrigues me.


My estimate does not assume a mega upgrade cycle kicked off by 5G iPhones. With the iPhone installed base having surpassed a billion users and continuing to expand by 20M to 30M people each year, Apple is in a good position to grow iPhone unit sales as the iPhone upgrade cycle plateaus between four and five years. This is where iPhone’s strong resale value enters the picture with consumers embracing various upgrading plans and options made possible by a well-functioning gray market.

If true, the likely reason is probably a lot more boring and pragmatic than the next iPhone having some killer, "must have" feature. Rather, it's a combination of existing users who are still on older iPhones finally deciding that it's time to upgrade (I am one of them who plans to upgrade from my 8+), to Apple making it easier to trade in their older iPhones (which in turn helps offset the higher prices of the next iPhone) and finance the cost of newer devices. In addition, these 2nd hand iPhones make their way to additional users, who in turn go on to purchase additional accessories, apps and services.


Bottom line, with the iPhone Trade-in Program Apple has rather masterfully addressed the inevitable challenge of a slowing smartphone market. It makes the high cost of acquiring a new iPhone more tenable, allows Apple to capture a good chunk of the residual value of selling an old iPhone, and it helps Apple to continue to build out the iOS installed base. That’s a win, win, win, and I expect to hear Apple talk even more about this going forward.

I would also like to share this article on how Apple's trade-in programme helps drive sales of newer iPhones and grow Apple's install base overall.

So even if people are holding on to their devices longer on average, the fact that the iPhone install base has grown to be so large means that even if a smaller percentage of users upgrade every year, this still works out hundreds of millions of iPhones sold every year. Which works out to be a net growth overall.

Which also suggests that Apple will only go on to gain more and more momentum in the coming years.

That the next iPhone may lack Touch ID or periscope lens or some other feature they deem a "must have" completely misses the whole point - which is that apple users do not buy specs.

Business 101 is probably a lot more boring than talking about folding phones, but one only gets you headlines on a tech blog like Theverge, while the other gets you the sales.
 
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