2013 Mac Pro 12-Core with 27-Inch Cinema display

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by sixonenine, Dec 27, 2015.

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is it worth it

Poll closed Dec 30, 2015.
  1. yes

    3 vote(s)
    30.0%
  2. no

    7 vote(s)
    70.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. sixonenine macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2015
    #1
    Need your guys opinion on something I saw this ad on craigslist in San Diego and I wonder if it's a good deal
    there asking $7500 for a 2013 mac pro 12-core with AppleCare , wireless keyboard and mouse plus a 27-inch Apple display.

    http://sandiego.craigslist.org/csd/sys/5360691211.html
     
  2. cerberusss macrumors 6502a

    cerberusss

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    #2
    Basically you get the display for free. Well, if you actually will use these 12 cores, then sure, it's a good deal in my opinion. However, for most people I'd argue the 6-core model hits the sweet spot of single-core performance and price.
     
  3. sixonenine, Dec 27, 2015
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2015

    sixonenine thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #3
    Thanks for the reply I think it's a ok deal brand new with everything cost $9,751.00 saving $2251 vs buying brand new and who knows if Apple is coming out with a new one they skip 2014 and 2015, People here say Apple is coming out with a new but i'm not hearing anything and who knows when the new mac pro coming out, I look at the six core that you mention but for the same price i can get the 12-core because the cost for the six core with these spec's

    • 3.5GHz 6-core with 12MB of L3 cache
    • 32GB (4x8GB) of 1866MHz DDR3 ECC
    • 512GB PCIe-based flash storage
    • Dual AMD FirePro D700 GPUs with 6GB of GDDR5 VRAM each
    • Apple Wireless keyboard
    • Apple Wireless Mouse
    • 27-Apple Thunderbolt display
    Cost $7267

    I know that this spec would be better in single core performance but for basically the same price I can get a used 12-Core, I checked eBay prices ranges for a 12-Core $5500-$7000 used but that's with no display, keyboard or mouse just a computer itself, I coming from a PC workstation and this is going to be my first Mac, with the money I saved i can upgrade the ram my self planning to upgrade the ram to 64GB from OWC for $591 sense it only have 16GB, and a bigger SSD a AURA SSD 1TB for $895 and I will still have money left over vs buying new, and your right this person is basically giving the display away.
     
  4. cerberusss macrumors 6502a

    cerberusss

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    #4
    I dare say that comparing based on price is not that interesting, when it comes to the Mac Pro.

    You're making a big tradeoff with a 12-core: the speed per core is a step down from what you're getting with a lower core count. To put this in other words: the 12-core has a maximum Turbo Boost between 3.5 and 3.0. The 6-core has a maximum Turbo Boost between 3.9 and 3.6.

    For most software, the single-core speed determines when the work is done fastest. So for most software, the 12-core is actually the slowest of the Mac Pros. Thus the ad on Craigslist is only a good deal if you actually know for a fact that you're going to fire those cores on all cylinders.

    I couldn't explain it any better than Marco Arment, have a look; https://marco.org/2013/11/26/new-mac-pro-cpus
     
  5. sixonenine thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Dec 27, 2015
    #5
    talk to him today to see if he will lower the price and he said that it's been sold already, I guess it was worth it to someone, Time to look on eBay or amazon should of bought it when I had the chance, oh well
     
  6. AidenShaw, Dec 31, 2015
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2015

    AidenShaw macrumors P6

    AidenShaw

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    #6
    First - do you really think that anyone will notice much difference between 3.5GHz and 3.9GHz? Your hour-long single threaded task at 3.5 will be done about 6 minutes earlier at 3.9. If I'm planning my day, there's not much difference between 60 minutes and 54 minutes.

    Second - if significant parts of your workflow (particularly the long parts) are multi-threaded, your hour-long multi-threaded task on the 12 core will take 92 minutes on the 6 core.

    If you have big pieces of your job that are multi-threaded (or you run lots of independent tasks at the same time), the 12-core will win.

    If you're sure that your stuff uses very few threads, and will never use more than a few threads, and you'll never buy new software that can use more threads - then go for the low core count CPU. Otherwise, buy as many cores as fit your budget
     
  7. Daisy81 Suspended

    Daisy81

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    #8
    Unless you are using the machine as a render machine or part of a farm I wouldn't go with a 12 core. I would go with the new 6 core. You will also get the new wireless keyboard and magic mouse. You might even consider getting the new trackpad because it supports force touch.
     
  8. AidenShaw, Dec 31, 2015
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2015

    AidenShaw macrumors P6

    AidenShaw

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    #9
    You mean the nearly three year old six core, right? ;)

    The OP was about a twelve core for sale. There's no option for a six core in the context of the OP.

    It's reasonable to argue that a new lower-core count system might be a better match - but to say "Unless you are using the machine as a render machine or part of a farm" over-simplifies the situation. There are other scenarios where high core count is good.

    However, as I have said and others have said - the used twelve core at nearly new price isn't a bargain if you don't need the extra cores.
     
  9. Daisy81 Suspended

    Daisy81

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    #10
    I meant the machine in post 3.
     
  10. AidenShaw macrumors P6

    AidenShaw

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    #11
    Sorry - I didn't have the whole thread in memory when I posted.

    Anyway, some time ago I sprang for my home system a Dell Precision T3610 with the same six-core Xeon that Apple is still using in the MP6,1. It was what "fit my budget" at the time.

    I've recently been regretting that I only went with six cores. Penny wise - pound foolish. Far too often I see all twelve virtual cores at 100%.
     
  11. Daisy81 Suspended

    Daisy81

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    #12
    No worries. :D

    I understand you outlook on buying a PC based machine. I did something similar but went the roll my own route. I haven't found 6 cores a limitation but my work flow typically puts more demands on the graphics capabilities and the 6 core was the most cost effective cpu allowing for x16 PCIe on both graphics cards. I deal in more real time based editing then rendering and encoding.

    I guess this is a good case in point of needing to pick the CPU for the job.

    You could use the tax write off for the depreciation of the machine to purchase the CPU you need and then sell the older processor if you feel that you need the upgrade.
     
  12. Bytehoven macrumors regular

    Bytehoven

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    #13

    I would just add... what might have better resale value down the road. It seems the higher core count rigs routinely have better resale, sometimes way more the the original cost difference. I would chalk this up to what Aiden noted, more software to multi thread more cores, including the OS.
     
  13. AidenShaw macrumors P6

    AidenShaw

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    #14
    Personal machine at home - no write off :(

    The T3610 was only sold with E5-1600 v2 processors - I'll look around to see if anyone has upgraded to E5-2600 v2.
     
  14. Daisy81 Suspended

    Daisy81

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    #15
    That depends on the firmware available for the motherboard, the amount of power the socket can handle and how much heat the cooling system in the machine can handle.
     
  15. AidenShaw macrumors P6

    AidenShaw

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    #16
    Power/cooling shouldn't be an issue - the hex E5-1650v2 is TDP of 130 watt. Almost all of the E5-2600v2 CPUs are 130 watt or below.

    Firmware is the big worry - if the T3610 has a white list of supported processors it might reject an E5-2600 based on the model number, not on whether it would work or not. Maybe I'll borrow a 10-core from work to see if it's recognized (I have a system with dual E5-2670v2 that's currently idle between projects).

    Looking at the prices for the 10-12 core CPUs reminds me why I went with the 6-core !
     
  16. Daisy81 Suspended

    Daisy81

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    #17
    If you have one you can bring home for the night that would answer your question.

    Oh yeah Xeons are not cheap. For me $560 for a processor was expensive enough. Until my machine is not meeting deadlines because it is maxed 100% and it can't keep up I don't think the expense of more cores is worth it. That isn't even close to being the case right now.

    Are you losing money with your 6 core being maxed?
     
  17. AidenShaw macrumors P6

    AidenShaw

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    #18
    The system makes no money - it's just a nice Xeon/ECC home PC.

    It's just wasting time, and the expectation that the situation will gradually get worse due to increased file sizes and more features in the software.
     
  18. Daisy81 Suspended

    Daisy81

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    #19
    What is the use case when you see all cores spiked? The only way I have been able to achieve that is encoding and rendering.
     
  19. AidenShaw, Jan 1, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2016

    AidenShaw macrumors P6

    AidenShaw

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    #20
    I often do multiple batch runs across large numbers of files - my guess is that the disks would support 20 or 30 threads before the tasks become disk-limited. Some video tasks are multi-threaded across a handful of cores, so I limit it to four or five concurrent jobs.

    Another common task is web crawling - grabbing hundreds or thousands of web pages to scan for certain things or coincidences. Embarrassingly parallel - each grab is a separate process.
     

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