MacAtt@ck

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 27, 2019
2
0
Shanghai
I have two computers I use for Video editing + encoding: Mac Pro (6,1 Trash-Can) for heavy-ish lifting, and a specked out 2017 15 in MacbookPro for working at home and some lighter projects.

Thinking about replacing both machines with the new 16in MBP.

My concern is that I may see some increased render times if I swap out the Trash-Can for the new MacBook pro.

Anyone have any thoughts on this?

My Current Mac Pro Specs:
  • 3.0GHz 8-Core Intel Xeon E5 processor
  • 64GB 1866MHz DDR3 ECC memory
  • Dual AMD FirePro D700 with 6GB GDDR5 VRAM each
  • 256GB PCIe-based SSD

2019 16in MBP that Im considering:
  • 2.3GHz 8‑core 9th‑generation Intel Core i9 processor
  • 64GB 2666MHz DDR4 memory
  • AMD Radeon Pro 5500M with 8GB of GDDR6 memory
  • 2TB SSD storage
 

throAU

macrumors 604
Feb 13, 2012
7,084
4,865
Perth, Western Australia
Based on spec, assuming the macbook pro doesn't throttle....

  • The CPU should be faster - architectural improvements plus it will boost to similar/faster speed especially on lightly threaded workloads
  • it will have quicksync available (i think), which can speed up certain video stuff if used - the Xeon definitely will not (quicksync needs the iGPU which xeons do not have)
  • The storage will be faster
  • The GPU will probably be faster - it is much more recent

However, thermals will be the thing. I'd see if you can test your workload out on one.
 
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MacAtt@ck

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 27, 2019
2
0
Shanghai
Based on spec, assuming the macbook pro doesn't throttle....

  • The CPU should be faster - architectural improvements plus it will boost to similar/faster speed especially on lightly threaded workloads
  • it will have quicksync available (i think), which can speed up certain video stuff if used - the Xeon definitely will not (quicksync needs the iGPU which xeons do not have)
  • The storage will be faster
  • The GPU will probably be faster - it is much more recent

However, thermals will be the thing. I'd see if you can test your workload out on one.

Yeah from some of the basic research I've done, and Im assuming this has to do with thermal throttling, It seems like, Yes, on paper the MBP should be faster... but under sustained and consistent pressure to the CPU+GPU the MBP may not be able run at full blast for extended periods of time(?)
 
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