2020 iMac Benchmarks Surface Online [Updated]

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Benchmarks from the new 2020 iMac have today been shared online by Mac Otakara.



The Geekbench benchmarks are from the newly-released 27-inch iMac with 3.0GHz Intel Core i5 processor and Radeon Pro 5300 graphics, compared to multiple specs of the previous 2019 iMac.

The lowest spec 27-inch i5 iMac from 2020 performs about 20 percent better in multicore than the lowest spec 27-inch i5 iMac from 2019. Although the lowest spec 27-inch 2020 iMac has a Intel Core i5 3.1GHz processor, it seems to perform better than an equivalent Intel Core i5 3.7GHz model from 2019. This is likely thanks to new 10th-generation Intel Core processors, which Apple says offer up to 65 percent faster CPU performance.

The 3.1GHz iMac gave a Geekbench Single-Core Score of 1090 and a Multi-Core Score of 5688.



Graphics capability has been measured using Geekbench Compute benchmarks. Compared to the 3.0GHz Intel Core i5 2019 iMac with AMD Radeon Pro 570X graphics, the 2020 iMac's Radeon Pro 5300 performs about 40 percent better. The Radeon Pro 5300 does not surpass the performance of the 2019 iMac with AMD Radeon Pro Vega 48 graphics, however. Apple states that the next-generation AMD Radeon Pro 5000 graphics deliver up to 55 percent faster performance than the previous generation.



MacRumors reader Stefan tested the high-spec 2020 iMac with 3.8GHz 8-Core Processor with Turbo Boost up to 5.0GHz, giving a single-core score of 1141 and a multi-core score of 7006. This is approximately 36% higher than the equivalent chip from the previous generation.



Stefan also offered Blackmagic speed tests of the 3.8GHz iMac's SSD, giving write speeds of 1963.3 MB/s and read speeds of 2250.2 MB/s.



The new iMac's SSD is soldered to the motherboard and therefore is not user-replaceable, according to ifun.de. Previous iMacs have not been soldered in place, allowing for upgrade or replacement. Supposedly according to internally published technical information, the 2020 iMac's individual SSD modules are soldered directly onto the motherboard, similar to how storage in MacBooks have been soldered down for several years. As a result, the storage configuration at the point of purchase is fixed and cannot be changed afterwards.

New information regarding the new 27-inch iMac's redesigned microphone array has also emerged today. The new iMac apparently features two microphones installed in the lower area of the iMac behind the screen, as opposed to the single microphone on previous models. This allows the 2020 iMac to deliver what Apple calls "studio-quality audio."

The new 27-inch iMac was unveiled by Apple on Tuesday, with faster 10th-generation Intel Core processors, next-generation AMD graphics, up to 128GB of RAM, a higher-resolution 1080p front-facing FaceTime camera, a True Tone display with a nano-texture glass option, a T2 chip, higher fidelity speakers, and more.

Update 9:30 a.m.: A source with access to Apple's repair manuals tells MacRumors that the SSD is in fact not soldered to the logic board but is connected to a proprietary Apple slot on the board.

Article Link: 2020 iMac Benchmarks Surface Online [Updated]
 
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Digital Skunk

macrumors 604
Dec 23, 2006
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Sure, I wouldn’t expect an SSD in this day and age to be anything buy stellar.

The scores aren’t bad, but I would love to see how the 10 core i9 compares to the iMac Pro 10core. Or even a Mac Pro. The iMac continues to surprise me performance wise, even for an all-in-one with no upgrade path.
 
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TwoH

macrumors 6502
May 19, 2019
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Won't be surprised if they go back to the 2014/15 times for soldered RAM on the 21.5", eurgh.
Interesting that they have gone to soldered SSD - but not surprising considering the removal of a HDD option.
 

Brian Y

macrumors 68040
Oct 21, 2012
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If you are a government-type bunch how do you remove the drives and destroy them at end of life? We have to do that (at a college) with all 2.5/3" drives and we don't even have any secret stuff.
You can't. You either trust secure erase programs (dubious with SSDs) or physically destroy the memory chips (and thus, destroying the logic board).
 
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zubikov

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Sep 3, 2014
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So the highest 10-core 3.6ghz i9-10850 is benchmarking at 1278/8223? Yikes. That's more or less in-line with last year's i9-9900K which is 1242/8292. SSD speeds also worse than last year.

It's just one set of benchmarks, but it seems to me like Apple is on purpose tuning the highest end BTO iMac down. Why not i9-10900? Why cheap out on an SSD when you could easily achieve 2800MBps R/W as we've seen in prior years.
 
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quagmire

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Apr 19, 2004
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Nice useless argument. Still a time bomb.
Even if the SSD wasn't soldered, it is tied to the T2 so the user wouldn't be able to replace it anyway.

Now what this does mean though is repair will be more expensive because now the whole logic board needs replacing......
 
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Martius

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Jul 12, 2008
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So the highest 10-core 3.6ghz i9-10850 is benchmarking at 1278/8223? Yikes. That's more or less in-line with last year's i9-9900K which is 1242/8292. SSD speeds also worse than last year.

It's just one set of benchmarks, but it seems to me like Apple is on purpose tuning the highest end BTO iMac down. Why not i9-10900? Why cheap out on an SSD when you could easily achieve 2800MBps R/W as we've seen in prior years.
The 10-core is not there, the 8223 is the last year i9. The only 2020 in that image is the base 3.1ghz i5.
 
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PsykX

macrumors 6502a
Sep 16, 2006
970
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SOLDERED! 😡 This isn't looking good for the RAM on the upcoming iMac design...

In summer 2018, my 3TB HD failed on my 4000 CAD iMac Late-2013. It wasn't covered by any recall.

So back in the days, I bought a 1TB Samsung SSD for $350 CAD or so. Did the job myself and it still holds very well today.

What would be the solutions today? At what cost?
 
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ouimetnick

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Aug 28, 2008
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how is that any different from any of the other hundreds of soldered electronic components? Are you privy to some secret reliability data that shows these SSDs last a few weeks before failing?
The SSD contains all of your data, and in the event of a logic board failure, it is nice to be able to remove the SSD and recover data (if it wasn’t backed up) I actually like the idea of soldered ram on portables. When I worked as an ACMT at my high school, we spent a lot of time reseating ram modules in student’s MacBook and MacBook Pros since if they were dropped the wouldn’t boot if the ram was slightly loose.

But in a desktop machine, the ram shouldn’t be soldered and the SSD should be socketed on all machines imo. The T2 security excuse is moot since the Mac Pro uses a socketed SSD and a T2 chip.

I’m sure that with Apple moving to their own silicon, EVERYTHING will be soldered together unfortunately. I’m surprised it hasn’t increased their warranty repair costs. Rather than replacing a defective module and getting credit from the part vendor, they have to rework the pcb and replace defective components on the board, a more time consuming and costly process.
 
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