Become a MacRumors Supporter for $50/year with no ads, ability to filter front page stories, and private forums.

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
59,223
23,141


A new Mac Pro that's coming in 2022 is set to use Intel's Ice Lake Xeon W-3300 workstation chips, according to an Intel leaker that WCCFtech says has offered reliable information on Intel Xeon chips in the past.

mac-pro-mini-feature.jpg

Intel's W-3300 Ice Lake CPUs are set to launch in the near future, and there have already been signs of new Ice Lake SP processors in the Xcode 13 beta. Intel has said that these chips offer "advanced performance, security, efficiency, and built-in AI acceleration to handle IoT workloads and more powerful AI."


Ice Lake chips for the Mac Pro would offer up to 38 cores and 76 threads, with the Xeon W-3775 positioned as Intel's top chip in the lineup. This top of the line chip features 57MB of cache and a 4.0GHz clock speed.

While Apple is transitioning its Mac lineup to Apple silicon and is developing a version of the Mac Pro that will run an Apple silicon chip, Bloomberg's Mark Gurman has said that Apple will also update the Intel Mac Pro.

Apple is working on a smaller Mac Pro that's about half the size of the original and that is expected to include an Apple silicon chip, but alongside it, the company is also developing a new version of the current Mac Pro.

The Intel-based Mac Pro that's in the works with Intel's W-3300 Ice Lake chips could be one of the last Intel Macs that Apple will develop. Apple has already begun transitioning the iMac, MacBook Pro, Mac mini, and MacBook Air lines to Apple silicon.

Article Link: 2022 Mac Pro Rumored to Use Intel's Ice Lake Xeon W-3300 Chips
 

chucker23n1

macrumors 604
Dec 7, 2014
7,595
9,905
So, why not sooner?

Is Intel once again taking months to actually ramp up production, long after they claim the product is "released"?

Or does Apple want to launch this upgrade in sync with the new ARM-based Mac Pro, as an "oh, BTW, we also have an Intel option" afterthought?
 

De4our

macrumors newbie
Nov 13, 2019
7
20


A new Mac Pro that's coming in 2022 is set to use Intel's Ice Lake Xeon W-3300 workstation chips, according to an Intel leaker that WCCFtech says has offered reliable information on Intel Xeon chips in the past.

mac-pro-mini-feature.jpg

Intel's W-3300 Ice Lake CPUs are set to launch in the near future, and there have already been signs of new Ice Lake SP processors in the Xcode 13 beta. Intel has said that these chips offer "advanced performance, security, efficiency, and built-in AI acceleration to handle IoT workloads and more powerful AI."


Ice Lake chips for the Mac Pro would offer up to 38 cores and 76 threads, with the Xeon W-3775 positioned as Intel's top chip in the lineup. This top of the line chip features 57MB of cache and a 4.0GHz clock speed.

While Apple is transitioning its Mac lineup to Apple silicon and is developing a version of the Mac Pro that will run an Apple silicon chip, Bloomberg's Mark Gurman has said that Apple will also update the Intel Mac Pro.

Apple is working on a smaller Mac Pro that's about half the size of the original and that is expected to include an Apple silicon chip, but alongside it, the company is also developing a new version of the current Mac Pro.

The Intel-based Mac Pro that's in the works with Intel's W-3300 Ice Lake chips could be one of the last Intel Macs that Apple will develop. Apple has already begun transitioning the iMac, MacBook Pro, Mac mini, and MacBook Air lines to Apple silicon.

Article Link: 2022 Mac Pro Rumored to Use Intel's Ice Lake Xeon W-3300 Chips
I’m not extremely well versed in Intel’s chipset and motherboard socket compatibility, as a current Mac Pro owner is there any chance in hell I can swap one of the new Ice Lake processors in? If not, and this would be extremely extra but I’m curious, would it be possible to swap the motherboards?

I have the 16-core, it’s no slouch but I was considering swapping in the 28-core as .R3D video files eat those 16 cores like they’re not even there. I assume an equivalent chip from Ice Lake would be faster and more efficient…
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Realityck

macrumors 603
Nov 9, 2015
6,161
8,955
Silicon Valley, CA
Even if the tech is amazing, buying an Intel Mac in 2022 seems odd.
Because businesses are still owning a lot of x86 Mac software. The transition is not meant to be a immediate end to what Apple sells to companies as solutions. Common sense requires high performance ARM workstation/server products to be introduced that sways enterprise customers to migrating, not heaving their intel based business solutions overboard. :p
 

Keymaster

macrumors regular
Dec 15, 2003
111
375
This probably makes sense business wise, the Mac Pro isn't meant for the average consumer, and businesses have invested in lots of software that's Intel based and probably want to stay with that until they really come up to speed on the new Apple software and chips. Plus, Apple will need to develop a super fast processor and computer that can handle multiple processor setups to handle the tasks the Mac Pro is built for. All of that takes time, and Apple is still at the beginning of making their desktop systems.

The small Mac will probably come with a single processor setup, and with some flexibility for the GPU, RAM, and disk upgrades; that makes a lot of sense for a home Mac that can do some heavy duty stuff like gaming. That will be a really nice machine when it lands, hopefully next year sometime.
 

xraydoc

macrumors demi-god
Oct 9, 2005
9,591
3,913
192.168.1.1
Why not transition to silicon? Or is it because they haven’t figured out the GPU tech?
They will, but it'll still take Apple more time to develop a home-grown solution that can match a 32-core Xeon with 128GB of RAM and four dedicated desktop GPUs. I would wager that the next Intel Mac Pro revision will be the last Intel Mac Pro.
 

Realityck

macrumors 603
Nov 9, 2015
6,161
8,955
Silicon Valley, CA
So disappointing! All this buildup for an M(whatever) Mac Pro and we're stuck with an lame Intel refresh.
You knew Apple is likely to continue to sell intel based Mac Pro's per WWDC 2020 statements, because there is no announced ARM SoC for workstation/server grade computing solution yet. Then you also have the rumor that TSMC has 100 million A15's associated with iPhones. So how's everything suppose to be accomplished at once? ;)
 

lederermc

macrumors 6502a
Sep 30, 2014
897
755
Seattle
Even if the tech is amazing, buying an Intel Mac in 2022 seems odd.
I have heard that "scientific" code, where the exact same answer needs to be reproduced for a given stream of calculation, is not so easily converted between CPU architectures. I worked in computer simulation of fluid flow and spent a lot of time investigating differences in answers from different compilers on the same CPU.
 

TallGuyGT

macrumors 6502
Aug 8, 2011
358
777
NYC
I can’t wait to spend $25,000 on a system that will barely outrun the 2022 MacBook Air! /s

In all seriousness, this would be more appealing (especially if released this year) for its ability to run x86 software that hasn’t transitioned, and importantly for some - Windows virtual machines.
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.