256GB MacBook Air actual storage capacity?

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macbookpro45

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Jun 20, 2010
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Hi all

Looking to pickup a 256gb macbook air, but I'm not sure how much actual memory that will mean i.e. getting a 32gb iphone nets you ~27 gb of actual storage space.

Can anyone tell me how much actual storage space is on the 256gb ssd macbook air?
 

Boyd01

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Feb 21, 2012
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There will be about 20gb of data on the computer when you take it out of the box. The iLife apps are included. Microsoft Office is not an Apple product and you must purchase and install it yourself if you want it.
 
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flowrider

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Nov 23, 2012
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And, IMO, running an SSD full is not a good idea. You'll take a hit performance wise, and the drive may fail prematurely. I think 60 to 70% of total capacity is a good rule of thumb.

Lou
 
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DancyMunchkin

macrumors member
Mar 19, 2014
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And, IMO, running an SSD full is not a good idea. You'll take a hit performance wise, and the drive may fail prematurely. I think 60 to 70% of total capacity is a good rule of thumb.
Whether running an SSD 'full' causes a performance hit or premature failure is a matter of fact, not opinion. Please site your source.
 
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Boyd01

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Interesting article, thanks. But it says 75%, not 60% to 70%. #

As a result of its benchmarks, Anandtech recommends that you “plan on using only about 75% of its capacity if you want a good balance between performance consistency and capacity.” In other words, set aside 25% of your drive and don’t write to it. Only use up to 75% of your drive’s free space and you should maintain ideal performance.
 
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flowrider

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^^^^Yes, I am well aware of that. However, I prefaced my remarks with IMO and I think.

Lou
 
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mlody

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Nov 11, 2012
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does 'basic apps' include imovie/iphoto and microsoft office?

If not, how much do each of those take up, roughly?
I have 256GB model and after installing all ilife apps and microsoft office (also have two different user profiles) it shows I am consuming about 27GB. I have 223GB left available.
 
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Boyd01

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With a SSD that clocks around 700 MB/s, I wonder how many people would notice the reduced performance as the disk fills up? If you're concerned, you could run the Blackmagic disk test from time to time and keep a record of the results.
 
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James Craner

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Sep 13, 2002
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I have a rMBP with a 256GB SSD that has around 24GB of free space. Been like that for around the last 12 months. I have not noticed any detrimental impact on performance, despite the hard disk being over 90% full.
 
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DancyMunchkin

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Mar 19, 2014
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I have a rMBP with a 256GB SSD that has around 24GB of free space. Been like that for around the last 12 months. I have not noticed any detrimental impact on performance, despite the hard disk being over 90% full.
You won't. flowrider believes that posting an opinion multiple times will cause it to magically morph into a fact.
 
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flowrider

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^^^^Yep munchy that's me alright:

Don’t Fill Them to Capacity

You should leave some free space on your solid-state drive or its write performance will slow down dramatically. This may be surprising, but it’s actually fairly simple to understand.

When an SSD has a lot of free space, it has a lot of empty blocks. When you go to write a file, it writes that file’s data into the empty blocks.

When an SSD has little free space, it has a lot of partially filled blocks. When you go to write a file, it will have to read the partially filled block into its cache, modify the partially-filled block with the new data, and then write it back to the hard drive. This will need to happen with every block the file must be written to.

In other words, writing to an empty block is fairly quick, but writing to a partially-filled block involves reading the partially-filled block, modifying its value, and then writing it back. Repeat this many, many times for each file you write to the drive as the file will likely consume many blocks.

As a result of its benchmarks, Anandtech recommends that you “plan on using only about 75% of its capacity if you want a good balance between performance consistency and capacity.” In other words, set aside 25% of your drive and don’t write to it. Only use up to 75% of your drive’s free space and you should maintain ideal performance. You’ll see write performance start to slow down as you go above that mark.
Lou
 
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flowrider

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Nov 23, 2012
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^^^^I'm not avoiding anything. The 60 to 70% figure That I adhere to is personal preference. I've read enough abut SSDs to form some conclusions that I adhere to. And, that's one of 'em. Ever hear of the adage that more is better, will in my case, I believe less is better when it comes to populating SSDs. And if Mister Craner and you want to live on the edge when it come to storage, so be it.

And if you consider experts opinion "irrelevant, repetitive" it really makes no difference to me.

Lou
 
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jj4146

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Nov 30, 2010
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The premature drive failure that Flowrider is referring to has to do with basic drive life. Hard drives have a limited number of times that data can be recorded to them before they start failing, that limit is very high though, and keeping a drive full increases the number of writes necessary to save files back to the drive thus speeding up the failure probability!
 
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DancyMunchkin

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Mar 19, 2014
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The premature drive failure that Flowrider is referring to has to do with basic drive life. Hard drives have a limited number of times that data can be recorded to them before they start failing, that limit is very high though, and keeping a drive full increases the number of writes necessary to save files back to the drive thus speeding up the failure probability!
Thank you, flowrider spokesperson. :rolleyes:

Please quote your source for this information or is this just your opinion?
 
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p3ntyne

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Jan 10, 2014
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How did this thread get so off topic?

Anyway, I agree with DancyMunchkin. My SSD is over 70% full and there are no performance issues. It still reads and writes at ~535/420 - the same as when I bought it. While I agree they do loose performance as they are filled, I doubt that it makes a difference until ~90% of it is filled.
 
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jj4146

macrumors newbie
Nov 30, 2010
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Thank you, flowrider spokesperson. :rolleyes:

Please quote your source for this information or is this just your opinion?
Ok, Munchkin, this isn't a peer review document, this isn't a college level paper, stop telling people to site their sources; you have just as much access to the same information as anyone else!

Here is a sited source for your viewing pleasure that proves my information is not an opinion but an industry known fact! Published by Western Digital in 2009

http://www.wdc.com/WDProducts/SSD/whitepapers/en/NAND_Evolution_0812.pdf

:p
 
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ihatepants

macrumors newbie
Jul 6, 2014
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i have a sandwich
i ate it
but wait, that is too much sandwich they said
you should've eaten only 70% they said
 
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