7200rpm vs SSD?

Discussion in 'Mac mini' started by jgw1283, Apr 4, 2012.

  1. jgw1283 macrumors regular

    jgw1283

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2007
    Location:
    Tempe, AZ
    #1
    am I going to notice substantially faster speeds with an SSD over the faster mini HD? Thinking about getting a mini in the next few months and have been reading much about SSD drives but don't like how small the capacity is
     
  2. Chad McCan macrumors newbie

    Chad McCan

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    Feb 24, 2012
    Location:
    Kansas City, MO
    #2
    Major difference. SSD is way way faster. Get it, don't look back.
     
  3. paulrbeers macrumors 68040

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    Dec 17, 2009
    #3
    Night and day. I won't do anything but SSD's in my desktops and laptops anymore. The biggest bottleneck in any computer is a mechanical hard drive. The only computer in our house that doesn't have an SSD is my server because (other than a restart), any application that runs on it opens at start up and then never gets closed down and for the most part it is just a file/media server.
     
  4. KScottMyers macrumors regular

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    Jul 17, 2009
    Location:
    Orlando, FL
    #4
    As others have said. There's no comparison between the two. The SSD is way faster in every way. Once you get use to the speed, there's no going back.

    I'm running two SSDs in Raid 0 on my mini and can't explain how happy I am with the performance. The prices are finally coming down to a reasonable place. Just do it.
     
  5. jgw1283 thread starter macrumors regular

    jgw1283

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    Aug 6, 2007
    Location:
    Tempe, AZ
    #5
    worth over $500 more? wow I'll have to check it out lol
     
  6. Lynn Belvedere macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2012
    #6
    The two are not even comparable. For everyday use, there is nothing that improves the user experience like a SSD.

    I'm never buying a computer with a HDD again. That technology is dead to me (except for external drives).
     
  7. Old Smuggler macrumors 6502a

    Old Smuggler

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    Sep 8, 2006
    #7
    ive been using ssd for 3 years for everything even my ps3
     
  8. Puevlo macrumors 6502a

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    Oct 21, 2011
    #8
    SSD will increase your boot time by about 10%. Not much else.
     
  9. Macman45 macrumors demi-god

    Macman45

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    Jul 29, 2011
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    #9
    It's simple. SSD= "Solid State" IE: no moving parts, therefore to make a comparison is almost unfair. A physical HDD is mechanically based, has moving parts and is going to be a whole lot slower. Go with the SSD. I would have them in all more devices by now were it not for the fact that the larger models are still not up to scratch reliability wise IMO.

    When they are, that's all I will use.
     
  10. jayhawk11 macrumors 6502a

    jayhawk11

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2007
    #11
    Lolwut? I've never seen a hard drive based Mac boot in <20 seconds. Even a clean installed iMac seems to struggle booting in 30.

    With an SSD, mine regularly boots in 12-15. That's a hell of a lot more than a 10% increase, and it's not even counting the improved app launch times and other benefits.
     
  11. Macman45 macrumors demi-god

    Macman45

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    #12
    Point proven. My MBA boots in under 10 seconds...256GB SSD.
     
  12. BornAgainMac macrumors 603

    BornAgainMac

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2004
    Location:
    Florida Resident
    #13
    I never realized how slow 7200rpm drives are until I tried SSD. I had a server running 15000rpm drives and switched to SSD drives and my disk I/O bottlenecks at work are a fraction of what they were during heavy loads.
     
  13. DaLurker macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2006
    #14
    An SSD will make the computer noticeably faster. Some argue it is the most noticeable upgrade you can do these days on a computer for an average user.
     
  14. paulrbeers macrumors 68040

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    Dec 17, 2009
    #15
    This is so untrue. First off, it will cut your boot times in half at least. I usually see 35 second boot times drop to 15 (or better), and any time you open an application for the first time, any time you open a document, anytime you copy or move a file, etc will all be near instantaneous. On a mechanical hard drive, it can take Excel up to 5 bounces before it full opens from the Dock. With an SSD, I can have it open in half a bounce (so what from 5-10 seconds to maybe 1 second?). Most of the excel files I work with are multiple MB files that open instantaneously when using an SSD, but that is not sure with a Mechanical drive.

    Either you have used very slow SSD's, or are trying to justify to yourself and the rest of the world why you don't use them....
     
  15. scottsjack macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2010
    Location:
    Arizona
    #16
    One of the biggest considerations can be storage capacity. In my case I use my late 2009 mini primarily as a DVR for EyeTV. I would love to spend a couple of hundred dollars are so and get a great SSD. The 3GB versions aren't all that expensive anymore.

    As a DVR (and backup Mac) I want a lot of storage capacity. The slow OEM 500GB 5.2k Hitachi is getting a little on the full side. The choice of a WD 750GB 7.2k for $130.00 or a really fast Intel 600GB SSD for $1000.00 is an easy one to make for me. The WD drive was a big improvement on my MBP so I'll settle for on on the mini.

    If I could live with 250GB my mini would have an SSD.
     
  16. paulrbeers macrumors 68040

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    Dec 17, 2009
    #17
    How many shows do you capture at a time? An external Firewire 800 would be good enough for capturing multiple HD streams at any given time. There's no reason to use an internal drive unless you are capturing 4+ shows at a time (and if you are, I'm not even sure a 750GB drive would be enough).

    1080i MPEG2 ATSC signal runs about 9GB per hour which works out to 20mb/s. You theoretically could stream 40 HD streams to saturate a firewire 800 (but disk thrashing due to trying to write that many streams at once would be your un-doing). Seriously, get an external 3.5" 7200 hard drive using firewire and you won't ever have to care how big your SSD is inside your Mac Mini.

    The Math from above: 9GB * 1024 = 9216 MB * 8bits = 73728 mb / 3600 seconds = 20.48 mb/s.
     
  17. Freyqq macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2004
    #18
    hard drive max reads = ~100 MB/s
    SSD max reads = ~500 MB/s
     
  18. QuantumLo0p macrumors 6502a

    QuantumLo0p

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2006
    Location:
    U.S.A.
    #19
    I would love a 1-2TB ssd but it simply isn't going to happen in the near future. I run a Momentus XT which, for me, it a good compromise of performance and capacity. Considering the specs of the current mini and that another refresh isn't all that far off, my 2010 mini is starting to get a bit long in the tooth and a external drive won't give me huge increase of anything other than capacity.

    The choice really always comes down to speed or capacity but not both, doesn't it? There are probably some users out there who installed two of the biggest, fastest ssd's you can get your hands but the majority of ssd users seem to have capacities that are a fraction of larger mechanical drives.

    Too bad the mini can't use pci ssd's; they completely smoke conventional ssd's for performance. Somewhere in the near future we'll see elimination of separate ram and storage.
     

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