750GB SATA or 240GB SSD?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by Keukasmallie, Jan 14, 2014.

  1. Keukasmallie macrumors regular

    Keukasmallie

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    #1
    I have an early 2011, MacBook Pro, 2.2 GHz Intel core i7, 750 GB SATA (w/ 653 GB free). I use the MBP for some correspondence and tables, email of a residential, not business, type and some Internet browsing. I am the only user of the MBP.

    I've read a lot about SSD's and the speed differences, etc. I've researched Crucial's SSD's and the installation and cloning of information, etc. However, just before I pull the trigger, I always ask myself, "Do I want to replace 759GB capacity with 240 GB capacity?"

    So, I need some advice, suggestions, slap-up-side-the-head.... Any and all thoughts considered and appreciated.
     
  2. simsaladimbamba

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    #2
    SATA is the name of an interface, short for Serial ATA or Serial Advanced Technology Attachment, and HDDs and SSDs use that interface in todays computers (with exceptions though).

    If you only use around 100 GB of your 750 GB HDD, a 250 GB SSD will do just fine, as you still have around 100+ GB free storage on an SSD if you would clone your HDD to an SSD.
    And an SSD will make your computer much snappier, it will feel like a new computer.

    You can always put the 750 GB HDD into an Optibay adapter or an external USB or Firewire enclosure to use that HDD as backup and extra storage device.

    MacBook, MacBook Pro: Replacing the Hard Disk Drive, transferring data to the new HDD

    the guide includes:
    • 0. Identify your MacBook or MacBook Pro
    • 1. Getting a new HDD
    • 2. Guides to replace the internal HDD with a newer one
    • 3. Transferring data from the old HDD to the new HDD
    • 4. Using the optical disk drive (ODD) slot for placing an SSD or HDD inside the MB/P (OPTIBAY)
     
  3. blueroom macrumors 603

    blueroom

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    #3
    A Seagate SSHD 1TB might be a nice compromise.
     
  4. costabunny macrumors 68020

    costabunny

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    #4
    If you can justify the cost, then I would suggest go for it. Get an external HDD enclosure for the 750 (those are cheap on Amazon for example) and use it for Time Machine or whatever you like.

    The SSD will make your mac feel like a new machine. App and system startup times will be dramatically reduced and overall it will seem far snappier.

    From what you say it seems space is a non-issue for you so a 240GB will do nicely.

    while the SSD/HD combo's can be useful if you need masses of space; in your case I would think thats not the best way to invest. The pure SSD solution will change your experience in a good way.
     
  5. Keukasmallie thread starter macrumors regular

    Keukasmallie

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    #5
    Thanks for the quick response and for the very informative attachment. I read the attachment quickly and will read it in depth shortly.

    At this point, I think I'll go with the 240GB SSD and use the current HHD as an external drive for storage, etc. I'm not sure I want to give up the optical reader at this point, and I can always make the HHD - OOR switch later if needed.

    Again, thanks!!

    ----------

    Each response gives me something to consider. I appreciate each of your recommendations to go for the SSD.
     
  6. costabunny macrumors 68020

    costabunny

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    #6
    You are most welcome - It's always nice when someone thanks the posters for their input. :)
     
  7. r0k macrumors 68040

    r0k

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    #7
    I have a late 2011 MBP and I'm still on the original 750 GB 7200 RPM drive. It works well. On my work-issued Windows box, I have an SSD. It makes ALL the difference on Windows. On OSX not so much. I only ever reboot for power failures and OS X updates. With Mavericks' improved speed and memory management my MBP is a pleasure to use.

    I had one of those "hybrid" SSD's in my 2008 MB. It was nice, but... Keep in mind there are wide variations in performance. Some Hybrid drives have a 5400 RPM HDD and 8 or even 16 GB of SSD. Most of them store EVERYTHING on the HDD and if it crashes, there is no getting anything useful back from the SSD as it is more of a cache than anything else. A better mixed drive approach would be Apple's fusion drive which uses an SSD and a 1 TB rotating drive.

    When I do upgrade, I'll go for an internal SSD and external FW or TB drive combination. I found that the hybrid drive, while an improvement over the 5400 rpm drive that came with my MBP, wasn't quite the full SSD experience I'm really looking for. So I wait until I can afford or can prioritize putting in a medium to large SSD.

    hope this helps...
     
  8. Keukasmallie thread starter macrumors regular

    Keukasmallie

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    #8
    rOK, yes it does help! I investigated the Seagate 1TB suggestion above, but found it isn't compatible w/ my MBP. I could use it externally, but there goes the whole laptop concept to a great extent.

    I am interested in your comments about the SSD in your home computer; since you rarely turn it off, it appears you don't benefit from one of the major speed-up advantages.

    I'm still on the 240GB SSD path and placing the "old" HHD in an external carrier for storage as needed.

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts.
     
  9. costabunny macrumors 68020

    costabunny

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    #9
    Personally I don't count boot times as a major advantage. So your mac starts up in ten seconds instead of 30? I don't see how its a big deal.

    The general extra speed for loading apps and usage of the system is a big deal.

    In my opinion i would recommend the SSD in your use scenario.
     
  10. ohbrilliance macrumors 6502a

    ohbrilliance

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    #10
    Go for the SSD. It will vastly speed up your system, and you're not losing any storage that you're actually using.
     
  11. Keukasmallie thread starter macrumors regular

    Keukasmallie

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    #11
    Pulled the trigger: Crucial M500 240GB SSD, install kit and tool kit. Should arrive next week. I plan to use Disk Utility to clone my HHD to the new SSD, install the SSD, then search for an external enclosure and cable for the HHD.

    Any enclosure/cable suggestions? Could I utilize the firewire port w/ the external drive?

    Film at Eleven!
     
  12. Fishrrman macrumors G3

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    Feb 20, 2009
    #12
    I agree with costabunny's reply #4 above.

    If your current usage patterns don't require all the space you have, the SSD will make a VERY nice improvement in performance. You WILL like it.

    As far as having "additional storage space" close by, you could put the old 750gb HDD into a 2.5" enclosure, and carry it around as well. I'd suggest something like this:
    http://www.amazon.com/Optimized-Ina...9803&sr=8-1&keywords=usb3+2.5"+enclosure+uasp
    Only $15, drive just drops in, bus-powered, easy to store and carry.

    Further suggestion:
    If you get an enclosure for the old drive, I suggest you partition the drive as such:
    - First partition - 240gb or so (equal to size of SSD)
    - Second partition - whatever is left
    Then, use CarbonCopyCloner or SuperDuper to clone the contents of the SSD to the external HDD. This will give you a second "immediately bootable" copy of your primary drive that is always accessible. Use the second partition for "scratch storage", whatever you wish to keep there.
    Hmmm... once you get the SSD installed, and the existing HDD into an external case, you may be able to use Disk Utility to simply "add" a second partition to the drive without a re-initialization -- worth trying first.

    Final suggestion:
    DON'T use Disk Utility to do the clone - use CCC instead.
    It's free to download and use for 30 days.
     
  13. kaltsasa macrumors 6502a

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    #13
    I have used a couple of these to good effect. I'm quite pleased with the price/performance/capacity. Takes a few reboots to learn but once it caches the OS and frequently used Apps it's as fast as my SSD and a heck of a lot larger.
     
  14. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

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    #14
    There is absolutely no reason not to use Disk Utility for the clone. It is the official Apple tool for this purpose and it works perfectly.
     
  15. eecyclone macrumors regular

    eecyclone

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    #15
    I'm pretty sure you'll want the external enclosure and cable in order to do the cloning. Otherwise you can only have 1 drive plugged into your computer at a time.

    With that said, I would look at newegg.com for a 2.5" hdd enclosure. They have several starting at $6 and going up from there.
    I've bought this one and it seems to work well. It was easy to install the HDD inside it.
     
  16. Keukasmallie thread starter macrumors regular

    Keukasmallie

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    #16
    Fishrrman, damn you're good! I just logged on to ask what steps I should take after I get my SSD installed and am sitting there with the HHD staring me in the face (hopefully Monday night). In reading the most recent posts to catch up, I see you are way way ahead of me.

    You beat me to my question with great suggestions. I will partition as you suggested and hope to use it as you proposed.

    I can't wait to get going. If I watch one more YouTube of a fifteen year old changing out an HHD for an SSD, I'll be able to do it in my sleep. I have discovered some great help articles from Crucial, OWC and Simsaladimbamba.

    eecyclone, thanks for the external enclosure lead. I'll check it out.

    ----------

    Ooops, I forgot about this question: Whither Trim? I read in several places that Trim is a near-necessity when using an SSD. I read the wiki description, plus a good article that gave me more info.

    What say you guys?
     
  17. satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

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    #17
  18. Keukasmallie thread starter macrumors regular

    Keukasmallie

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    #18
    And then there's this....

    The space used on my Macintosh HD is 97.33 GB; the space used by Time Machine for a complete backup is 97.33 GB. I excluded nothing from back ups, so my b/u's must include Mavericks.

    Therefore, is there any reason I can't simply Restore from Time Machine to "clone" my new SSD (after the proper partitioning, etc.)?
     
  19. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

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    #19
    That will work perfectly. Just option key boot to the TM drive and you will see the normal recovery screen. Use Disk Util from there to format the drive to Mac OS Extended then quit Disk Util and click restore. Presto. :)
     
  20. Keukasmallie thread starter macrumors regular

    Keukasmallie

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    #20
    JOY...the deed is done!

    I cloned my new Crucial M500 240GB SSD from my original 750GB HDD using Disk Utility and all went as planned (and predicted by some of you who responded above). Replacement of the HDD w/ the SSD following cloning went w/o a hitch too.

    So, now I'm awaiting my external enclosure (thanks, posters, for the guidance). When I get it, I'm considering re-partitioning the old HDD into a boot volume and a storage volume. Of course, I have no idea if this is possible, but that's my next quest.

    Thanks for all your help!!!
     
  21. simsaladimbamba

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    #21
    Not possible in the slightest. Really. Do not believe that sentence.

    It is easy as pie. Just go to Disk Utility and choose 2 partitions instead of 1 using this method and resize as you wish. But know, that that procedure will delete all data on the HDD.
     
  22. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

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    #22
    Just so I am clear. You have the old 750GB with the OS and all still on it that you removed, and you want to put that in an external enclosure. Then leave one partition with the bootable OS etc on it and add a second partition for storage?

    If that is what you want, you can shrink the first partition using disk utility following this guide, then click the plus to add your second partition to the end. This will not erase the data on the first partition that you shrunk down.
     
  23. Keukasmallie thread starter macrumors regular

    Keukasmallie

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    #23
    What I have and what I'd like to end up with

    I have my original 750GB HDD just removed from my MBP, early 2011, 15", 2.2ghz, model 8.2. Tomorrow I expect to receive an Inateck external enclosure for it + USB 3 connecting cable (I only have USB 2 in the MBP, but the cable is backward compatible.).

    I'd like to have that external drive serve two purposes: First, hold a boot/restore of Mavericks; second, general storage.

    I realize that repartitioning to two volumes will erase the external drive, so I would do a full b/u (97.33GB for me) to a 200GB volume then use the remained for general storage, e.g., pics, iTunes, etc.

    Yes, No, Maybe....?

    (Actually, I'm so happy w/ the new SSD in the MBP that I should step back for a while, but maybe I'm on a roll....)
     
  24. Keukasmallie thread starter macrumors regular

    Keukasmallie

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    #24
    Also...

    now that I've replaced the original HDD w/ an SSD, what power settings should I consider for maximum efficiency and effectiveness? I downloaded TRIM and have it turned on, but beyond that I'm not sure whether or not there are additional settings that should be changed.

    Thanks for your responses!
     
  25. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

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    #25
    Changing the partitions like you described will not erase the drive. Just follow the guide I linked in my previous post to shrink down the first partition to 200GB like you want and your working boot version of Mavericks will still be there. Then just add the second 550GB partition to the end.

    Nope... you don't need to do anything else.
     

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