Become a MacRumors Supporter for $25/year with no ads, private forums, and more!

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
54,557
16,653



102547-box_flash_cs5_150x150.jpg


Earlier this month, Apple made a change in its iPhone developer agreement that appeared to directly target Adobe's plans to release a Packager for iPhone feature in its forthcoming Flash Professional CS5 application that would allow creators of Flash content to export their projects into native iPhone format. The change resulted in a fair amount of fallout in what is becoming an increasingly strained relationship between Apple and Adobe.

Adobe Flash Platform project manager Mike Chambers yesterday offered on his blog a detailed explanation of his and Adobe's view of Apple's change of heart, noting that while Packager for iPhone will continue to ship in Flash Professional CS5, Adobe is ceasing investments on the feature for the future.
While it appears that Apple may selectively enforce the terms, it is our belief that Apple will enforce those terms as they apply to content created with Flash CS5. Developers should be prepared for Apple to remove existing content and applications (100+ on the store today) created with Flash CS5 from the iTunes store.

We will still be shipping the ability to target the iPhone and iPad in Flash CS5. However, we are not currently planning any additional investments in that feature.
Chambers notes that the Packager feature complied with all of Apple's licensing terms throughout its development, with Apple making the change banning the feature just days before Adobe's official introduction of Creative Suite 5.

Furthermore, Chambers explains that the teams working on the Packager feature implemented a number of technologies that can easily be moved to other devices and platforms, setting the stage for a push into Android-based phones. A number of developers have already shifted gears to port their Flash games to Android, and Chambers himself is shifting all of his personal mobile focus to Android.

Article Link: Adobe to End Development on Flash-to-iPhone Compiler in Wake of Apple License Change
 

cvaldes

macrumors 68040
Dec 14, 2006
3,237
0
somewhere else
Die Flash, die!

(I know it will not happen overnight, but anything to rid us of the wretched pestilence known as Flash is a step toward a better universe.)
 

BillyBobBongo

macrumors 68030
Jun 21, 2007
2,530
1,129
On The Interweb Thingy!
*Grabs Popcorn*

Here we go again, I expect yet another thread full of Flash vs HTML5 arguements...with the usual suspects appearing to talk about things that have absolutely no idea about!!
 

Enuratique

macrumors 6502
Apr 28, 2008
276
0
*Grabs Popcorn*

Here we go again, I expect yet another thread full of Flash vs HTML5 arguements...with the usual suspects appearing to talk about things that have absolutely no idea about!!

LOL, totally. I'm going to get the melted butter.
 

puffnstuff

macrumors 65816
Jan 2, 2008
1,469
0
Die Flash, die!

(I know it will not happen overnight, but anything to rid us of the wretched pestilence known as Flash is a step toward a better universe.)

this has nothing to do with the flash plugin more to do with making something in flash and porting it over to objective-c so it can be put in the app store
 

Macmoney

macrumors member
Mar 11, 2009
63
9
na
Die Flash, die!

(I know it will not happen overnight, but anything to rid us of the wretched pestilence known as Flash is a step in the right direction.)


why would flash die? I'm so tired of that argument. Flash is going
to be able to export to HTML-5. Do you seriously expect a company
like Adobe to just fall over and die instead of adjust to market conditions.

I think not.
 

cvaldes

macrumors 68040
Dec 14, 2006
3,237
0
somewhere else
this has nothing to do with the flash plugin more to do with making something in flash and porting it over to objective-c so it can be put in the app store
By not allowing Flash developers to port to Objective-C for the App Store discourages Flash development in the first place.

Both lack of the mobile Flash plug-in or the inability to port from Flash for mobile devices (or at least the predominant smartphone platform) reduces the viability of Flash's future as a development environment.

Flash is in the rear view mirror now.
 

shiseiryu1

macrumors 6502a
Sep 30, 2007
534
294
It makes sense

Apple has good business reasons not to let Flash-complied apps in the store. I'm actually glad for myself because I was debating on whether to focus more on Flash or Objective-C and this made my decision a no-brainer. I am disappointed though that Apple and Adobe aren't working more closely...seems that the do have a lot of shared interests. "Can't we all just get along?"... :)
 

f00f

macrumors 65816
Feb 18, 2009
1,112
54
New Yawk
Die Flash, die!

(I know it will not happen overnight, but anything to rid us of the wretched pestilence known as Flash is a step toward a better universe.)

It may die on Mac fairly quickly -- and we'd all be fine with that -- but the non-Mac crowd (which is fairly significant eh?) will keep it alive. If we could get more people moved over to :apple: we could kill MS and Adobe. ;)
 

ChazUK

macrumors 603
Feb 3, 2008
5,390
24
Essex (UK)
I hope Android does gain out of this. People who criticise Apple's motives should note that Apple's ballpark is Apple's. Their game, their rules.

Don't like it? GTFO. :D
 

cvaldes

macrumors 68040
Dec 14, 2006
3,237
0
somewhere else
why would flash die? I'm so tired of that argument. Flash is going
to be able to export to HTML-5. Do you seriously expect a company
like Adobe to just fall over and die instead of adjust to market conditions.

I think not.
Based on Adobe's inability to provide mobile handsets with a high-quality plug-in, Flash will not be a part of the most important growth industry: mobile Internet.

That's where the development is going. If you confine yourself to the 2002 world of desktop computers and browsers, yes, Flash's dominance would not disappear, but it's a different world in 2010. The lack of Flash in the mobile arena will push it to its grave.
 

PandaOnslaught

macrumors regular
Feb 22, 2010
153
0
It may die on Mac fairly quickly -- and we'd all be fine with that -- but the non-Mac crowd (which is fairly significant eh?) will keep it alive. If we could get more people moved over to :apple: we could kill MS and Adobe. ;)

id prefer that people didn't switch over to macs, makes me feel all special inside :D:D
 

mytdave

macrumors 6502a
Oct 29, 2002
603
775
spite

In one quick move Apple cuts off its nose to spite its face.

I have no love for Flash, but Apple could have simply made no effort to support it (as they are doing by banning it from iDevices) instead of actively attacking a cross-compiling dev tool.

If devs want to compile apps with some other tool, who cares? If the native app runs fine, what does it matter? If the native app is sloppy, the marketplace will reject it.

Apple can continue to enhance the platform, release new APIs, etc. and it's up to the devs to keep up. If Flash compilers don't keep up, they'll get left behind. The apps would have to maintain parity with C language apps or customers will reject them for better wares. This is not a problem for Apple, they're just being petty.
 

donny77

macrumors member
Jun 24, 2009
83
0
Apple is not thinking about us users. They are being selfish and tyrant. Not cool... :mad:

Apple is most certainly thinking of their users. Users vote with their dollars, and users have voted for Apple devices that DO NOT support Flash. Content providers want users to get their content. Now that Apple users have chosen no flash, content providers have to decide to alienate Apple customers or move away from Flash. I would bet a lot of money the latter happens. In the end, the users cares about the content, not how it is provided.
 

ChazUK

macrumors 603
Feb 3, 2008
5,390
24
Essex (UK)
Based on Adobe's inability to provide mobile handsets with a high-quality plug-in, Flash will not be a part of the most important growth industry: mobile Internet.

What is and why do we need a "mobile internet"?

Smartphones nowadays are very capable little gadgets which can handle the non "mobile internet". I'm all for HTML5 and the development of open standards but I don't want it to be at the expense of a watered down version of what we have now.
 

retroneo

macrumors 6502a
Apr 22, 2005
723
94
this has nothing to do with the flash plugin more to do with making something in flash and porting it over to objective-c so it can be put in the app store

Flash Packager didn't convert to Objective C, it created a native ARM .ipa directly.

If Flash Packager generated an Objective C XCode project that you used XCode to compile (like Unity) than it would be okay.
 

jaw04005

macrumors 601
Aug 19, 2003
4,376
44
AR
Apple can continue to enhance the platform, release new APIs, etc. and it's up to the devs to keep up. If Flash compilers don't keep up, they'll get left behind. The apps would have to maintain parity with C language apps or customers will reject them for better wares. This is not a problem for Apple, they're just being petty.

It was a big problem for Apple with Metroworks Codewarrior and Carbon. As Mac OS X matured and Apple released new APIs, Adobe and Microsoft idly sat and watched. And when Apple decided to move to x86 processors, it blew up in their face.

Moving to Xcode is what took Adobe and Microsoft so long to get out Universal Binaries. Mac users went years without native support in critical applications like Photoshop and Word (Intel transition announced June 2005, first Intel Macs shipped January 2006, CS3 shipped April 2007, Office 2008 shipped January 2008).

Of course, Adobe said at the time Xcode wasn’t ready to handle an application as big as Photoshop. But is anything ever Adobe’s fault?

Adobe article about Codewarrior to Xcode:
http://blogs.adobe.com/scottbyer/2006/03/macintosh_and_t.html
 

donny77

macrumors member
Jun 24, 2009
83
0
What is and why do we need a "mobile internet"?

Smartphones nowadays are very capable little gadgets which can handle the non "mobile internet". I'm all for HTML5 and the development of open standards but I don't want it to be at the expense of a watered down version of what we have now.

Read his comment. NO smartphone has a full featured desktop equivalent of Flash. Flash is the watered down version of what we have now. HTML5 is fully supported.

And he never said we need to redesign the Internet for mobile devices. He said mobile devices are the growth in the Internet industry. Flash fails there.
 

iSheep

macrumors newbie
Apr 11, 2010
12
0
I use flash block on all my systems and am happy. Goodbye flash I am ready for you to be gone.

Er...the topic is about the production of Apps from within CS5 and not about Flash on your hardware. You did read the post, right?
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.