AIFF Format not supported on iPods?

Discussion in 'iPod' started by -BigMac-, May 9, 2011.

  1. -BigMac- macrumors 6502a

    -BigMac-

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2011
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #1
    Hi guys,
    half my itunes library is in AIFF format (i like good quality).
    It is: 44.100khz at 2822kbps AIFF audio file. Sample size is 32bit.
    Why is it not working?

    Thanks a lot
     
  2. theLimit macrumors 6502a

    theLimit

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2007
    Location:
    up tha holler, acrost tha crick
    #2
    I believe iPods can only play up to CD quality. Try lowering your files down to CD quality, 16-bit 1411kbps aiff files.
     
  3. lostless macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    #3
    Why do you have 32bit files???? Unless your editing audio (32 bit allows more wiggle room for effects and such), most sources are only 16bit. CDs are only 16bit.
     
  4. gnasher729 macrumors P6

    gnasher729

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    #4
    And Apple Lossless saves almost half the space again.
     
  5. -BigMac- thread starter macrumors 6502a

    -BigMac-

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2011
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #5
    A noobish error. It was the first time i had to convert a file like a flac :)

    Done :) I lowered it to 16 bit and voila :) Thanks a lot :)

    Doesn't Apple Lossless compress the file? I heard it is a sort of compression, like a zip. Can you please clarify if it is or isnt? It would otherwise be a better option :) Thanks :)
     
  6. AdrianK macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2011
    #6
    Apple Lossless uses compression, like a zip. It's similar to FLAC.

    AIFF is not "Apple Lossless" (though it is lossless), but it does not use compression. It's similar to WAV.
     
  7. gnasher729 macrumors P6

    gnasher729

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    #7
    It is lossless compression. In other words, when you play it back, it is bit for bit identical to the original. No difference in sound whatsoever. Apple Lossless usually uses 700 to 800 KBit / sec, instead of AIFF's 1411 KBit / sec.
     

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