Almost wish I got the nMP Quad core...

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by snouter, Mar 30, 2014.

  1. snouter macrumors 6502a

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    May 26, 2009
    #1
    http://eshop.macsales.com/MyOWC/Upgrades.cfm?sort=pop&model=486&type=Processor

    Does not look like they are offering to do the installation yet and I have not checked if these prices are competitive, but, CPU swaps look to be part of the nMP experience.

    The E5-2667 and E5-2690 look pretty interesting, especially if you have a Quad base to start with.

    I think I'll get deeper into my AppleCare before pulling the screwdrivers out.

    A quad core 12GB (save $100 on the inevitable RAM upgrade) with D500 or D700 and one of these CPUs looks like a hot ticket.
     
  2. scottrichardson macrumors 6502

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    #2
    Yep, thaat 3.3GHz 8-core CPU looks pretty nice - higher raw speed than the 8-core CPU Apple provides.
     
  3. golf1410 macrumors 6502a

    golf1410

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    #3
    Basically, swapping the cpu means void the warranty and Apple Care.
     
  4. flowrider macrumors 601

    flowrider

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    #4
    ^^^^One of the reasons I don't buy AC. I usually void the warranty on my Mac Pros before I even turn them on:eek:

    Lou
     
  5. flat five macrumors 601

    flat five

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    newyorkcity
    #5
    basically, no it doesn't.

    you can definitely swap a cpu and the warranty/apple care stays intact.. if you break the computer while attempting the swap, that damage won't be covered.
     
  6. VirtualRain macrumors 603

    VirtualRain

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    #6
    If you need 8-12 cores, that is definitely an interesting option. However, I believe the BTO 6-core is still the best-bang-for-the-buck this generation.
     
  7. snouter thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #7
    stock 4c/12GB/D500: 3400
    stock 6c/16GB/D500: 4000 (3.5GHz, 12MB cache)
    apple 8c/12GB/D500: 5400 (3GHz, 25GHz cache)

    stock 4c/12GB/D500 + OWC 8c upgrade 5600 (3.33GHz, 25MB cache)
    stock 4c/12GB/D500 + OWC 10c upgrade 5600 (3GHz, 25MB cache)

    4c + 12c upgrade is actually 300 worse going this route.

    If you think you need 8c or 10c I think you need to consider this route over the Apple 8c.
     
  8. VirtualRain macrumors 603

    VirtualRain

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    #8
    Yeah, good analysis.
     
  9. ScottishCaptain macrumors 6502a

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    #9
    Is this just speculation, or do you have experience to back up this statement?

    Let's say you replace the CPU, and a week later the logic board decides to blow up. How can you prove that this didn't happen because you upgraded the CPU? From Apple's point of view, you've been monkeying around with stuff you're not supposed to touch (otherwise it'd be in the user manual).

    At that point, I can't imagine why Apple wouldn't say "Sorry, unsupported upgrade, you're out of luck". Do you have proof that this is not the case?

    -SC
     
  10. Riwam macrumors 6502a

    Riwam

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    Basel, Switzerland
    #10
    As long as Apple covers a nMP I would not take risks...

    ........................
    Maybe I am too scary but I would not change anything besides RAM (which is clearly user upgradable) as long as there is a warranty from Apple on the nMP.
    I see that other people have much more courage than the little I have...
    My full respect to them!
    :p
     
  11. chrisn123 macrumors member

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    Nov 26, 2011
    #11
    I'd like to see real-world comparisons to the stock parts. I'm thinking about Turbo Boost / downclocking response to parts that might have higher power/thermal demands at peak load than the stock parts.

    I have the 8C and am very pleased with the balance of single-core responsiveness and ability to sustain high clock rates at full load (e.g., video renders or handbrake).

    This is a case where normal benchmarks might not tell the whole story. If you aren't running multi-threaded CPU-bound workloads, then why pay $2K for a bit more max speed on simpler jobs?
     
  12. flat five macrumors 601

    flat five

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    #12
    read this:

    http://blog.macsales.com/18244-owc-diys-wont-void-your-macs-warranty

    i suppose you can post your logic board question at the blog.. they appear to engage the users and will probably give an answer.
     
  13. golf1410 macrumors 6502a

    golf1410

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    #13
    Unfortunately, every time we buy a mac, we always accept all the terms that Apple created. That's accept button.
     
  14. flat five macrumors 601

    flat five

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    #14
    not sure what you mean ??

    you're saying there's a button you push in which you agree to no machine upgrades/self-service without canceling apple care?

    you got a copy of this agreement?
     
  15. golf1410, Mar 31, 2014
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2014

    golf1410 macrumors 6502a

    golf1410

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    #15
    It falls into unauthorized modification category in Apple's limited warranty.

    This Warranty does not apply:
    *(g) to an Apple Product that has been modified to alter functionality or capability without the written permission of Apple;
     
  16. flat five macrumors 601

    flat five

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    #16
    <sigh>

    ok.. believe what you want to believe.

    @others who may be faced with this decision-
    research this for yourselves. don't believe me- don't believe golf.. but whatever you do- don't do your research at these forums
     
  17. Naimfan macrumors 68040

    Naimfan

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    Jan 15, 2003
    #17
    Golf is correct.

    The OWC snippet is correct as far as it goes - you can upgrade user-serviceable parts without voiding the Apple factory warranty. That's part of what the Magnuson-Moss Act means (the other is that you're not required to use only Apple sourced or approved parts).

    On the the new Mac Pro, however, the only user-serviceable part is RAM. Hence, replacement of the CPU would void the Apple warranty, as it would be considered to have been "modified" and thus excluded from coverage as specified in the section quoted by Golf.
     
  18. snouter thread starter macrumors 6502a

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  19. N19h7m4r3 macrumors 65816

    N19h7m4r3

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    #19
    Tell me about it. It was really interesting, and even I was reconsidering buying just the quad core so I could upgrade it myself.
     
  20. Cubemmal macrumors 6502a

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    Jun 13, 2013
    #20
    I'm a pretty good Mac modder, but stop at CPU's generally. I have a 2009 oMP and haven't even done it there. Why? It seems a little pointless. By the time I'm aching for a new processor I'd be better off just buying a whole new computer. Case in point, my 2009 Nahelam original wasn't holding me back, it was the overall system. So I got a 2013 nMP and have been happy. *

    RAM and Flash is a comfortable mod, and one blessed by Apple so I'm sticking with that. My hex core and D700's make a powerful package. When it's time to upgrade, in 4-5 years time, I'd rather upgrade both the CPU and the GPU's, so I'll get a new one.

    * The oMP is doing duty as a Windows gaming computer and a school computer for my kid.
     
  21. Jim-H macrumors member

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    Dec 31, 2013
    #21
    This is also how I feel about upgrades. By the time I'm ready for a CPU upgrade, just about every other component is ready too. Problem is, we should see a lot of big upgrades this year which will make the machine feel older a little quicker than normal. Oh well, that's the nature of tech.
     
  22. Cubemmal macrumors 6502a

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    #22
    True, but the bigger issue here is that Apple went out the gate with relatively old tech already. The CPU was Sandy Bridge - well that's Intel's fault, but the GPU's are somewhat older tech too. They seem to do this, which is take the older, possibly safer route with new releases.

    I think that MP 2015 release will be a substantial jump from this one, mainly in CPU and GPU.
     
  23. Riwam macrumors 6502a

    Riwam

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    Basel, Switzerland
    #23
    I agree with you

    ........................................
    I agree with your point of view.

    I suffered hell with a LaCie PCIe card which was supposed to add USB3 "high speed" connectivity to a Mid 2010 8 core MacPro, but actually made my Bluetooth mouse jump wildly and even the trackpad was a PITA.

    I also added 2 PCIe cards which were supposed to supply eSATA speed (but worked when THEY wanted!).

    At that point I followed the wise advice of my son and decided to sell my MacPro, while it still had 1/2 year Apple Care which brought me a very acceptable price.

    Therefore I have difficulty to understand people who invest a lot of money and even much more time (and risk!) changing their CPU and/or their graphic card in their classic MacPro instead of consider to buy a nMP.

    As long as the only Apple original "speedy" connectivity of any classical MacPro is the now old FW800 and the inside is SATA 2, also not at all up to date, why change "some" parts in a computer conceived and built in 2006 and only marginally updated since then?

    If the new parts would be extremely cheap and changing the CPU and GPU a child's work, then OK.
    But when I read posts of people having done it and see the money they paid (their work I cannot see but imagine it!) I truly do not understand them
    :rolleyes:
     
  24. beaker7 macrumors 6502a

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    Mar 16, 2009
    #24
    GPU swaps take around 1-2 minutes. Maybe 5 if you include driver install.

    CPU upgrades a little more. When I do them on PCs perhaps 10 minutes, 15-20 on a Mac Pro.
     
  25. flat five macrumors 601

    flat five

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    newyorkcity
    #25
    then explain this:

    i took my superdrive out of my (2010) mbp, installed an ssd in the original drive's place and put the original drive in place of the superdrive.. that's well beyond a cpu swap as far as 'modification' is concerned..

    ..and my applecare remained intact.


    i think you're (and others) making assumptions and stating them as fact.. is this a possibility?
     

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