Antibiotics In Your Fast Food Meat

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Huntn, Oct 4, 2017.

  1. Huntn, Oct 4, 2017
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2017

    Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

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    #1
    Restaurant report card: What's in your fast food meat?*
    http://www.cnn.com/2017/09/27/health/fast-food-antibiotics-grades/index.html

    *Although some of these are regular restaurants.
    I attribute it to cattle raised in unhealthy stockyard conditions cause it’s cheaper. The article does not spell out if cooking meat well done resolves the issue of the antibiotics or the super bacteria effecting the consumer, because most fast food meat is well done, but I eat much of my steak rare... :(



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  2. Hater macrumors 6502a

    Hater

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    #2
    Policies and practises, how many boxes they check on a spread sheet stating a probably one-sided questionnaire sent in to them by CNN?

    Right...

    Starbucks probably got an F because they don't have any procedures on where they source their meat for their coffee or something. :rolleyes:
     
  3. AlliFlowers Contributor

    AlliFlowers

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    #3
    Yet another good reason to be a vegetarian.
     
  4. arkitect macrumors 603

    arkitect

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    #4
    Another reason not to eat "fast food". (And also not to eat your food fast.)

    I am very picky about meat. I eat it very seldom — and certainly never in the humungous slabs some people feel is their birthright.

    Organic. Failing that, at least free range.
    Luckily here we have some rules and regulations about what animals may be injected/fed.

    Still… fast food. The profits have to be made somewhere — treat the animals poorly as they slip and slide towards the kill, grind s**t into your "burger" and pay your employees a slave wage. Win-win for the capitalist system.
     
  5. Billburns macrumors 6502

    Billburns

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    #5
    This post is making me hungry for chick fil a now
     
  6. D.T. macrumors G3

    D.T.

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    #6
    Yeah, when I feel a sore throat coming on, I like to pick up a couple of Beef ~n~ Cheddars.
     
  7. RevTEG macrumors 6502a

    RevTEG

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    #7
    I still can’t think of anything from a “stockyard” that’s on Starbucks menu or was it just the OP referencing stockyards and steak as in beef.
     
  8. Phonephreak macrumors 6502a

    Phonephreak

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    #8
    The easiest way to avoid this crap is to avoid fast food. Love my chipotle.
     
  9. jbarley macrumors 68040

    jbarley

    Joined:
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    Vancouver Island
    #9
    Hater, good user name, you read something and see exactly what you want.

    Starbucks got a "D" according to the posted chart.o_O:D
    --- Post Merged, Oct 4, 2017 ---
    Yes then you only have to worry about all the pesticides used.:D
     
  10. Zenithal macrumors 604

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    #10
    Starbucks sells ham sandwiches at some locations and other stuff. But they don't make it. They contract it out.
     
  11. Huntn thread starter macrumors P6

    Huntn

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    #11
    Do they offer sandwiches?
    --- Post Merged, Oct 4, 2017 ---
    Of all the fast foods where I live, I like Popeye’s a fried chicken place that started in New Orleans, and What a Burger which started in Corpus Christi, Texas, but I have no clue where they fall on the chart. Taco Bell is a favorite which gets a B on the chart, it’s owned by Pepsi, so maybe that makes a difference.
    --- Post Merged, Oct 4, 2017 ---
    Starbucks is on the chart, I don’t know why.
    --- Post Merged, Oct 4, 2017 ---
    I love Vancouver. :) I assume you see many of the same chains we do in the States.
     
  12. Hater macrumors 6502a

    Hater

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    #12
    You're missing the point.

    The rating is on their policies and procedures around the usage of pesticides, nothing at all to do with actual levels of pesticides in their products.

    A question like "Do you have a policy on antiseptic levels within your supplied meat" - You'd "fail" on that question for not having such a policy, even if it's not applicable due to there not being any meat in coffee. It has nothing to do with actual antibodies/septics/pesticides in the food itself.
     
  13. bruinsrme macrumors 603

    bruinsrme

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    #13
    LOL, those are added all natural vitamins and minerals
    --- Post Merged, Oct 5, 2017 ---
    Yes please!!!!

    That might help lower the cost of steak, which I am all for
     
  14. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #14
    Except for pesticides and GMO
     
  15. Zenithal macrumors 604

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    #15
    And even in the case of organic produce, you're still consuming pesticides through air transfer, but most importantly, that certified organic pesticides exist. I didn't know this until 2011 and it stumped me, but it makes sense. One of the more basic compounds that works for stuff like aphids is neem oil. Which has some toxicity to children and those with compromised immune systems (elderly). Initially, I thought this was a US thing only, but all western countries follow the line, including the EU consortium.

    It's easier to assume everything you consume has been treated with pesticides than to worry over individual products. I use neem oil myself. It's great for a lot of stuff, but oh boy does it cause your skin to break out in a rash. Diluted or not.
     
  16. ThisBougieLife macrumors 68000

    ThisBougieLife

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    #16
    Good to see Chipotle scoring high; I love Chipotle :) Wonder where In-n-Out ranks. Those two are about the only fast food places I go to anymore.

    Never going to be a vegetarian, love meat too much, but I'm all for eating less red meat and less fast food.
     
  17. Volusia macrumors 6502

    Volusia

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    #17
    Chipotle has sickened thousands with salmonella from their veggies!
     
  18. Huntn thread starter macrumors P6

    Huntn

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    #18
    I wonder if that has to do with manure in the fields and not proper washing of said vegetables? Although it can from improper handling and hygiene associated with the people handling the veggies.
     
  19. Hater macrumors 6502a

    Hater

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    #19
    Fields? Manure?

    More like from sitting in a luke-warm warehouse for 6 months before use.
     
  20. Huntn thread starter macrumors P6

    Huntn

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    #20
    Vegetables and greens?
     
  21. Zenithal, Oct 8, 2017
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2017

    Zenithal macrumors 604

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    #21
    It can be done. Organic produce alongside non-organic can be picked and preserved in a non-oxygen (less than a few percent) environment for months. It's not lukewarm, though. It's cold storage. You replace the oxygen with other gases and it slows down the oxidation of the fruit or veg to practically nothing.

    The fruit you bought at Whole Foods could have been picked months or a year ago. The tech has been around for about 100 years, but only in the last 20-25 years has it become more mainstream and sophisticated. They're fairly common in most western nations, even east Europe uses them. Europe's been using them for a few decades. The US began playing catchup maybe 10-15 years ago.

    Though there is a limit of what you can store. Fresh greens like lettuce or spinach rapidly oxidate after being cut or pick due to their high water nature. However, they and most other high water content vegetables are easily grown in controlled environments, even organic. I forget the rough figures, but in Europe (EU and outside) and the US, any and all produce that's applicable can be stored for months at a time. Fruit with a non-permeable skin such as apples can be stored for months. The average hovers around 18 months. Fruit, organic or not, is coated with wax and placed in an environment with almost no oxygen and pumped with a gas that slows down decay to a thousandth of a percent each day. When bins go out for shipment, the wax or other coating is removed and then the fruit's got 3-4 weeks before it goes bad.

    Apricots, peaches, pears, etc. go under a similar process but their storage life is much shorter. The entire process is very interesting and very cool. We don't see it much here in California due to the fertile weather year round. However, I have seen special varieties of apples in select stores I know for a fact aren't in season and haven't been for months. Tastes fine. We bought some this week.

    Months ago I bought some honeycrisps from the US. Way, way out of season. Tasted as if it was picked days ago. Also why you can buy organic winter strawberry varieties right into the first few weeks of summer, when the growing season ends as the first frosts come in. Most apples in the US, Mexico and Canada come from a few select major farms, and then cold stored.

    Even with cold storage, you still face shortage issues due to demand. Berries in the US are often imported alongside domestic grown product because people love their berries. Heck, I know I do. Even fruit imports from Oceania are cold stored there, then sealed in oxygen depleted containers, brought here, unsealed and quickly shipped to stores.

    On the other hand, if you're lucky enough to live near fruit or veg farms, you can get the fresh stuff quickly. Some regions also prosper from their weather. I recall reading about an area of Hawai'i that can grow a variety of apples year round beating what that variety can do, due to the warm weather and perfect humidity year round.

    If you recall, a week ago I made a post of produce exports from the US to other countries. This is how we can ensure a steady supply of food throughout the year. In the same manner, that's why we can import produce from other countries including European ones or even Asia without it going bad. Farm picked fruit or home fruit tree picked fruit is good for a day or two before it begins to oxidize.

    I've got a lot of fruit trees and they produce too much. Any excess gets cut up and frozen for later use or cooked down into a jam and then preserved. Though there's some stuff I won't touch. Blueberries, raspberries, and similar just taste weird to me when preserved or cooked. I'll eat it, but taste wise, it's gross to me.

    Those go into black tea and mixed. I can't quite taste it then. I don't eat much fruit these days. I prefer vegetables more. However, a couple apples and other fruit a week alongside a cranberry walnut bran muffin or two keep the doctor away.
     
  22. ReynalynMO macrumors newbie

    ReynalynMO

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    #22
    This is scary.
    --- Post Merged, Oct 8, 2017 ---
    This is scary.
     
  23. Huntn thread starter macrumors P6

    Huntn

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    #23
    Welcome to the MacRumors forums! :)
     
  24. rhett7660 macrumors G5

    rhett7660

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    #24
    I would like to know where In-N-Out ranks also. I wonder since they are not "national" like a lot of the other big names on this list they didn't make the cut to be graded. I would imagine they score pretty high on their report card though.
     
  25. Zenithal macrumors 604

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    #25
    They would score high. Even a really good third-wave burger chain like Three Guys or Umami can't compete with a well made IN-N-Out burger. Three Guys quality varies so much, though. Their operations aren't as hunkered down as In-N-Out's.
     

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25 October 4, 2017