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ProTruckDriver

macrumors regular
Jul 28, 2016
217
307
Virginia
The better question is why anyone would trust a third party to do operating system security than the experts who built the system?

Because I don't trust that the experts that built the system could stop everything. I like layered security because of this:

Safety is the first order, but things happen. When I got my new desktop MAC in early 2016 I wound up with Mackeeper and I have no idea how. I swear I did not download it. It took Malwarebytes to locate and remove all of the attending junk files from my system.

More than once I have gone to a site I use on a regular basis and all of the sudden a bunch of files will start downloading into my download file. These are not junk sites, but they were infected by hackers. Point - an ounce of prevention is a good thing.
 
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Bazza1

macrumors regular
May 16, 2017
221
145
Toronto, Canada
The better question is why anyone would trust a third party to do operating system security than the experts who built the system?

Because Apple only updates its OS once a year - so along with that, any protections they may have built-in - only very rarely offering an update on particularly egregious AV issues. And then, most often only after its become a known problem that hits the Media.
Meanwhile, reputable 3rd Party companies that specialize in nothing but AV keep their products up-to-date against issues that may pop up daily.

Oh, and users trying to be good 'tech citizens' and not inadvertently pass along to others something that the may have been received virtually.

That's why.
 
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Naalsi

macrumors newbie
Sep 21, 2017
12
15
MacKepper is a known malware software. The honest truth is that you don't need an anti-virus on MacOS. Gatekeeper only allows what the user installs and runs to be attached to the system files.

So if you're a pr0n viewer do yourself a favor and install a proper adblocker, if you're a torrenter make sure you download from private trackers that have been vetted by their respective communities.

I've had zero viruses and malware in my 12+ years of using MacOS. But had plenty (and I can understand the fear) on Windows that just install themselves without any user input.

Bottom line: you're in control of what you run and install on MacOS, and it does a great job (and Gatekeeper keeps improving) warning you about potential threats.

For those who think that the Mac needs antivirus, you can stop reading now.
 
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GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,448
815
For those that think that the mac doesn't need antivirus, you can stop reading now. ;)
I kept reading because I don't think that Macs don't need antivirus apps. I know they don't.

Anti virus on macs is a scam.
Just curious, Why?
First, there has never existed a true virus in the wild that can infect macOS or OS X. You can't defend against something that doesn't exist.
Second, Mac malware is completely avoidable by practicing safe computing, without using any software. If you're careful what software you install and don't install pirated software, you'll be fine.
Third, Mac malware is so relatively rare, most users will never encounter any.
Forth, if you're concerned about Windows users on a network, Mac malware doesn't run on Windows systems.
Fifth, several AV apps have proven to be attack vectors themselves, increasing the vulnerability to malware.

Antivirus was/is necessary for Windows, where true viruses do exist. The AV companies are seeking to prey on the Windows mentality as people migrate to Macs, making them think the same security procedures are required. They're not. Hence, a scam.

Like so many others, I've run without AV software on Macs for more than 12 years and never had an infection. If you want to check your system, MalwareBytes is a good choice. You can scan your system and then close the app, so it's not continuously running, draining system resources.
 

Pilot Jones

macrumors regular
Oct 2, 2020
130
179
Does anyone have any thoughts on Avast for the MacBook? Currently using the free version, doesn't seem to be giving me any issues and it does stop random malware attempts when they do crop up. Would love any feedback on how Avast ranks among free anti-viruses.
 

Tech198

macrumors P6
Mar 21, 2011
15,296
2,006
Australia, Perth
Safety is the first order, but things happen. When I got my new desktop MAC in early 2016 I wound up with Mackeeper and I have no idea how. I swear I did not download it. It took Malwarebytes to locate and remove all of the attending junk files from my system.

More than once I have gone to a site I use on a regular basis and all of the sudden a bunch of files will start downloading into my download file. These are not junk sites, but they were infected by hackers. Point - an ounce of prevention is a good thing.

Right,, but you can educate yourself as well.. The problem is, people keep breaking out of that..

If i can do it, others can.. it just take discipline.

Touch wood, i will say 10000% say i have never download unreliable stuff ever. Windows or Mac... btw.
 

mekump

macrumors newbie
Jun 25, 2010
28
10
Because Apple only updates its OS once a year - so along with that, any protections they may have built-in - only very rarely offering an update on particularly egregious AV issues. And then, most often only after its become a known problem that hits the Media.
Meanwhile, reputable 3rd Party companies that specialize in nothing but AV keep their products up-to-date against issues that may pop up daily.

Oh, and users trying to be good 'tech citizens' and not inadvertently pass along to others something that the may have been received virtually.

That's why.

From reading this article it looks like Apple releases updates to Xprotect and MRT more than once a year.
 

AppleSmack

macrumors regular
Jun 30, 2010
227
72
From reading this article it looks like Apple releases updates to Xprotect and MRT more than once a year.
Very helpful to see it straight from the source!
However, I notice that they qualify it as *known* malware. I think that's where an AV product has the advantage with recognising behavioural flags of unknown malware.

If you aren't going to use a third party AV, I'd say the minimum requirement would be to use a reputable adblock plugin when browsing, to reduce the risks from malicious ads.
 

hobowankenobi

macrumors 65832
Aug 27, 2015
1,502
511
on the land line mr. smith.
For those that are skeptical, I can add that yes, although much, much less common than on Windows, there is real Mac malware and adware for Macs there.

I see a very small number get captured at work (more than 2,500+ Macs), and my wife, who works in web advertising, gets adware/malware on her Mac more than any other I have ever encountered. 2-4 per year, roughly.

This is a worst-case scenario, as she has to verify ads when they are created...and a very small percentage—clearly—is intentionally and invisibly installing adware/malware on her Mac. While not common, it is very real.

So far, only Malware Bytes (free version) and some manual cleaning of browser plugins/extensions have been needed, over about a 5 year period.
 
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