Any Latin experts here

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by The.316, Feb 10, 2017.

  1. The.316 macrumors 65816

    The.316

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2010
    Location:
    25100 GR
    #1
    Im looking for this phrase in Latin:

    Always remember, put the glass down

    I want to get it as a tattoo, but Im trying to get the correct translation.

    Now, I used google translate, and I got this:

    Recordemur semper, ut in speculo

    I also got this, when I rephrased it a bit:

    Semper, posuit in speculum est


    Which translation is the best, or is there another option? Appreciate the help!
     
  2. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #2
    I got:
    Semper mitte in vas.
    Ut semper in speculo.

    :)
     
  3. chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    #3
    Exactly what meaning of "glass" do you intend? I'm pretty sure speculum in Latin refers to a looking glass, i.e. a mirror. Look up the English word speculum and read the etymology.

    You can also reverse the translation from the Latin back into English. For example:
    Recordemur semper, ut in speculo --> Let us recollect, always, as in a mirror,
    Semper, posuit in speculum est --> Always put it in a glass​

    If by glass you mean "a drinking cup", then that's quite different from "a handheld mirror". The thing is, I can't tell which one you mean from the English phrase, as both have a discernible, though veiled, meaning.


    Semper isn't a literal translation of "always remember". Literally, it translates as "ever" or "always", without the "remember", e.g. the Latin phrases "Semper fidelis" or "Sic semper tyrannis". Used as an admonition or warning, then "memento" would probably be more suitable, e.g. "Memento mori".


    I'm not a Latin expert by any measure, so take the above with a libra of sal.
     
  4. Apple fanboy macrumors P6

    Apple fanboy

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Location:
    Behind the Lens, UK
    #4
    No idea, but what a strange thing to want tattooed.
    Is there a story to go with?
     
  5. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #5
    Yes, I was wondering about that. I assume that the OP means a "wine glass" - but, was wine served in 'glassware' in Ronan times (rather than in goblets of pewter, silver or gold)? If "glassware" for wind didn't exist, then the language might lack a word to describe it.

    Moreover, @chown33, you have made an excellent point about how the word "glass" has different meanings which are entirely dependent on context.

    A 'glass' mirror, is not the same as a pane of glass (which also would have been very rare at that time, as many windows were not glassed in).
     
  6. Mousse macrumors 68000

    Mousse

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2008
    Location:
    Flea Bottom, King's Landing
    #6
    I would think the closest Latin word for that type of glass would be "vitros" as in in vitro (in the glass). Here is a brief Latin lesson from everyone's favorite comedy troop.
     
  7. chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    #7
    Google translation suggests poculum or calyx as translations for English "goblet", among others.
    https://translate.google.com/

    Rome used glass for many things:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_glass

    There are pictures in that article of glass containers for various purposes, including a "circus beaker" which is basically a glass mug. Earthenware or pottery was probably more common than glass, though.


    I appreciate the reference, but I'm fairly sure "vitros" refers to the material, rather than the shape it's formed into, or the purpose of the vessel ("The pellet with the poison's in the vessel with the pestle, the chalice (calyx) from the castle holds the brew that is true").
     
  8. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #8
    Fascinating post.

    Yes, from what I have read, I would have assumed that glassware was a lot less used than earthenware or stoneware for such purposes.
     
  9. yaxomoxay macrumors 68000

    yaxomoxay

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2010
    Location:
    Texas
    #9
    Let me ask to a friend of mine that works in the only place where they still use Latin (a priest in Vatican City). He's usually grumpy when I ask him about Latin, but I might get this out of him.

    My only word of advice is to repel anything similar to poculum, speculum, or oculum at any cost.
    The reason? poculum, speculum, or oculum, as in the XXI century any of these words might immediately attract some attention to Italian/Spanish/Portuguese speakers as of a word that finds its etymological root in culum.
     
  10. The.316 thread starter macrumors 65816

    The.316

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2010
    Location:
    25100 GR
    #10
    Glass, as in a cup. As far as the story goes, I will let you know after I get it done.
     
  11. Roller macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2003
    #11
    Great thread. I took one year of Latin in ninth grade about 50 years ago. For some reason, the first three words—discipuli picturam spectate (students look at the picture)—stayed with me. Latin helped in my medical career—so many terms are derived from it—and with written and spoken English in general. I often cringe when I hear educated people mispronounce "et cetera" (and the rest) as "ek cetera," an error that would be prevented by knowledge of basic Latin. For those so inclined, I just came across this blog post about the influence of Latin on the English language.
     
  12. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #12
    Thoroughly enjoyed your linked blog post - thanks for sharing it.
     
  13. downtherabbithole macrumors member

    downtherabbithole

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2017
    #13
    I wish I could help, I studied latin but I've long forgotten it. Also curious to hear the story behind this.
     
  14. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas
    #14
    "Ecce, in pictura est puella nominae Flavia" - Look in the picture is a girl named Flavia.

    That's all I really remember from my two years of Latin in high school. Well, I do remember doing lots of declension charts and the best part of the whole experience, learning more Roman history.
     
  15. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #15
    Yes, agreed.

    I studied Latin for a number of years at post primary school (what Our Transatlantic Cousins describe as High School) and, as a result, developed a fascination with Roman history which I still retain to this day.
     
  16. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas
    #16
    Romulus and Remus, mythology, aqueducts, politics, establishing an empire, building roads, military tactics, barbarians, literature, architecture, theatre, gladiators and games, etc... A truly incredible time in history.
     
  17. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #17
    Have you read Mary Beard's superb "SPQR - A History of Ancient Rome"?

    It is an outstanding piece of work, and I am also rather partial to Tom Holland's excellent book "Rubicon" which looks at why the Roman Republic fell.
     
  18. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas
    #18
    I have not, I'll have to add them to my reading list. Thanks for the suggestion.
     
  19. chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    #19
    Another suggestion: the Marcus Didius Falco series of mystery novels, by Lindsey Davis.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Silver_Pigs
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lindsey_Davis

    Also the "SPQR" series of mystery novels by John Maddox Roberts:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SPQR_series

    The characters and writing styles are quite different, but the setting in ancient Rome (and contemporaneous Egypt in the "SPQR" series) is pretty interesting.

    If mystery novels aren't your thing, well, de gustibus non est disputandum.
     
  20. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #20
    Tom Holland also wrote a more recent book (Rubicon - which I think first rate - was written before he became well known; I read it shortly after it was published, and think it very readable and highly intelligent) called "Dynasty: The Rise & Fall of the House of Caesar".

    I have mixed feelings about this book; it is a lively, rollicking read, and the history is very solid. And, while I want history to be lively, accessible, and fun to read, I am not sure that I want to read the verb "****ing" (used in its literal sense as a verb, not a word casually tossed in because he couldn't think of anything else to say or write) used with abandon; used pretty sparingly, it can be extremely effective, but as a tool to inspire a sense of shock and awe, and make the book 'sexy' to a young, presumably male, readership, I must admit to reservations.

    Mary Beard manages to write thrilling history - without profanity.

    Anyway, I wrote to Tom Holland querying this - there are paragraphs in his book where this is the most frequently used verb. By way of reply, he sought to suggest that the blame be put on his editors, which - for a variety of reasons - is a reply that didn't inspire me.

    I'm a published author (history), and - in my experience - the author has a considerable say in what is published; besides, apart from an unease - a philosophical - with the concept of "throwing someone under the proverbial bus", or blaming someone for your stuff, I think, in writing, if you write it, and it appears under your name, you own it.

    It is still a very good book, - and sold very well - but, whereas I would unhesitatingly recommend "Rubicon" - which I think excellent, I am more ambivalent about "Dynasty".
     
  21. ThisBougieLife, Feb 16, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2017

    ThisBougieLife macrumors 65816

    ThisBougieLife

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2016
    Location:
    SF Bay Area, California
    #21
    ^I can also recommend SPQR. Excellent work :)

    I took four years of Latin in high school and am currently double-majoring in linguistics and classics at UC Davis, with an emphasis on Latin. I'm not an expert, but I do have a decent amount of knowledge.

    Semper recordare: poculum depone

    Literally this would be: "Remember always: set the cup down", if you want two separate clauses like that.

    Semper memento poculum deponere would be more like "always remember to put the cup down".

    Both "memento" and "recordare" are imperatives of verbs meaning "remember". As chown says, "memento" seems to be more common in warnings. "Memento" also seems to be more commonly used with infinitives.
     
  22. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #22
    Excellent post, and fascinating that you are studying classics.

    Re "memento" it also carries shades other than a simple 'warning', rather, it is more an instruction to 'remember to pay heed' or "bring to mind" something - such as, 'memento mori' for example, a symbol, or something of the sort which serves as a reminder of death.
     
  23. The.316 thread starter macrumors 65816

    The.316

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2010
    Location:
    25100 GR
    #23
    So does anyone have a definitive translation? Im going to the tattoo shop later today, and I wanted to bring him some ideas. I appreciate the help guys.

    And when I get it done, I will explain it.
     

Share This Page