Other Anyone else not like looking at their phone when out of the house?

subjonas

macrumors 68020
Original poster
Feb 10, 2014
2,290
1,970
At home is a completely different story. I’m a content-consuming fiend, so at home I’m on a screen constantly (but usually an ipad or tv). And like everyone here I’m a tech enthusiast. But when I’m out in the world, I prefer to focus on my surroundings, especially (but not only) when people are around, so I want to be on my phone as little as possible. Of course, my phone is an invaluable tool for many necessary tasks when out and about, but I want it to do these tasks as quickly and non-obtrusively as possible, so that I can keep my focus on the world around me. That’s why the SE was the most ideal phone for me. All of that function in an unassuming size (I would have paid for more function in the same size if I could).

But when I look around at the world, at the sizes of phones these days and how it seems like people are always looking at their phones by default, I feel like such an odd one out. Not judging. People have their reasons. Just sharing my position to see how many others, if any, can relate.
 
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austyn23

macrumors 6502
Nov 22, 2017
290
226
Yes, I try to use less tech in general. I stoped saying to my kid “do that again” to take him a photo.

In his birthday (2 years) I was amazed how the parents where all saying orders to their kids so they could grab videos or photos: “do it again”, “wait! Jump now!” “Give her a kiss and look to the camera”...I left my phone on the bag and just played with my kid...

A basic phone like the SE (basic I mean compared to the last ones) helps a lot; but when you take “that” photo you want a better camera (or that is what you think to justify a 1000 dls phone?).

Each their own...
 
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subjonas

macrumors 68020
Original poster
Feb 10, 2014
2,290
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Yes, I try to use less tech in general. I stoped saying to my kid “do that again” to take him a photo.

In his birthday (2 years) I was amazed how the parents where all saying orders to their kids so they could grab videos or photos: “do it again”, “wait! Jump now!” “Give her a kiss and look to the camera”...I left my phone on the bag and just played with my kid...

A basic phone like the SE (basic I mean compared to the last ones) helps a lot; but when you take “that” photo you want a better camera (or that is what you think to justify a 1000 dls phone?).

Each their own...
Good for you for having the awareness to recognize potentially unhealthy behavior in your life and having the initiative to correct it.

I don’t know if I’m trying to decreasing tech in my life in general. I think for me it’s more about recognizing where I’m using it well and where I’m misusing it. Because technology is just a tool that amplifies what I want to do, whether healthy or unhealthy. I’m at the helm, so the issues lie with me.
Being on my phone excessively in public, missing out on the world and people so that I could keep myself entertained and stimulated, was something I recognized as definitely not healthy for me, and am very glad I stopped. Though sometimes I still get drawn in.

Yes, to each their own. The SE is the best phone for me, though I wouldn’t mind paying for upgrades, especially the camera.

So far, it doesn’t seem like a lot of people find this relatable.
 

noteple

macrumors 65816
Aug 30, 2011
1,407
324
There is a market but a small one for the functionality of an 11 pro in a iPhone 4 form factor.
The battery life hit makes it unfeasible.
 

Crow_Servo

macrumors regular
Feb 17, 2018
182
138
America
I use my phone sparingly when I’m outside the house, unless I’m waiting somewhere and there’s down time. But in general I’m not obsessed with my phone.

At home, I’m on my iPad, not my phone, so really, my phone doesn’t get a whole lot of attention.
 

subjonas

macrumors 68020
Original poster
Feb 10, 2014
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There is a market but a small one for the functionality of an 11 pro in a iPhone 4 form factor.
The battery life hit makes it unfeasible.
It’s funny, I didn’t mention the iphone 4 although I do like its form factor even more than the SE. I agree, the market for small phones is small, and the market for flagship small phones is even smaller. And while there is definitely size limitations for the amount of features they can pack in there—some of the fancy portrait stuff and bokeh probably wouldn’t make it—I think a general upgrade in lenses/sensors would be reasonable. I would even be fine with a protruding camera and multiple lenses, personally. And I don’t think the newest chips are any more power hungry.
 

now i see it

macrumors 601
Jan 2, 2002
4,460
8,833
I agree it's appalling.
Go on a walk anywhere where people are mingling about and more often than not most are staring at their phones.
It happens at the beach too.
I think it has become a bit of an addiction and people don't care one bit.
Ive never consciously thought I shouldn't take my phone out of my pocket because it will interrupt the real world. I think that's a sign of fighting an addiction too. But fight on.
 

KrisYYC

macrumors member
Sep 26, 2017
68
48
At home is a completely different story. I’m a content-consuming fiend, so at home I’m on a screen constantly (but usually an ipad or tv). And like everyone here I’m a tech enthusiast. But when I’m out in the world, I prefer to focus on my surroundings, especially (but not only) when people are around, so I want to be on my phone as little as possible. Of course, my phone is an invaluable tool for many necessary tasks when out and about, but I want it to do these tasks as quickly and non-obtrusively as possible, so that I can keep my focus on the world around me. That’s why the SE was the most ideal phone for me. All of that function in an unassuming size (I would have paid for more function in the same size if I could).

But when I look around at the world, at the sizes of phones these days and how it seems like people are always looking at their phones by default, I feel like such an odd one out. Not judging. People have their reasons. Just sharing my position to see how many others, if any, can relate.
I'm the same way. I don't like being unaware of my surroundings so when I'm out of the house my phone stays in my pocket for most of the time. The one exception is when I'm grocery shopping because I use the reminders app for grocery list.

I see way too many people completely unaware of their surroundings, especially pedestrians crossing a busy road. Even if they have the right of way and are in a cross-walk they should still pay attention instead of just staring into their phone as they saunter across the road.

I just don't get the need so many people have to have a screen in front of their face all hours of the day :confused:
 

cics

macrumors regular
Dec 6, 2016
102
59
Milano
At home is a completely different story. I’m a content-consuming fiend, so at home I’m on a screen constantly (but usually an ipad or tv). And like everyone here I’m a tech enthusiast. But when I’m out in the world, I prefer to focus on my surroundings, especially (but not only) when people are around, so I want to be on my phone as little as possible. Of course, my phone is an invaluable tool for many necessary tasks when out and about, but I want it to do these tasks as quickly and non-obtrusively as possible, so that I can keep my focus on the world around me. That’s why the SE was the most ideal phone for me. All of that function in an unassuming size (I would have paid for more function in the same size if I could).

But when I look around at the world, at the sizes of phones these days and how it seems like people are always looking at their phones by default, I feel like such an odd one out. Not judging. People have their reasons. Just sharing my position to see how many others, if any, can relate.
That's the reason why I would prefer using a cellular Apple Watch as personal cellular device. It's going in that direction. Still connected, but less distractions.
 

Khedron

macrumors 68020
Sep 27, 2013
2,149
4,182
Yes, I try to use less tech in general. I stoped saying to my kid “do that again” to take him a photo.

In his birthday (2 years) I was amazed how the parents where all saying orders to their kids so they could grab videos or photos: “do it again”, “wait! Jump now!” “Give her a kiss and look to the camera”...I left my phone on the bag and just played with my kid...

A basic phone like the SE (basic I mean compared to the last ones) helps a lot; but when you take “that” photo you want a better camera (or that is what you think to justify a 1000 dls phone?).

Each their own...
Weird to think how the next generation is going to grow up with a camera pointed at them for as long as they can remember.

After that, the idea of Big Brother style constant surveillance will not only seem fine to them but be associated with the love of their parents and be welcomed.
 

Micky Do

macrumors 68000
Aug 31, 2012
1,843
1,430
An island in the Pacific Ocean
At home is a completely different story. I’m a content-consuming fiend, so at home I’m on a screen constantly (but usually an ipad or tv). And like everyone here I’m a tech enthusiast. But when I’m out in the world, I prefer to focus on my surroundings, especially (but not only) when people are around, so I want to be on my phone as little as possible. Of course, my phone is an invaluable tool for many necessary tasks when out and about, but I want it to do these tasks as quickly and non-obtrusively as possible, so that I can keep my focus on the world around me. That’s why the SE was the most ideal phone for me. All of that function in an unassuming size (I would have paid for more function in the same size if I could).

But when I look around at the world, at the sizes of phones these days and how it seems like people are always looking at their phones by default, I feel like such an odd one out. Not judging. People have their reasons. Just sharing my position to see how many others, if any, can relate.
I don't own a smartphone and seldom carry the cheap Nokia that I do own. I got it because I don't have a phone line to my apartment...... My mobile phone usually sits on top of the fridge, and $25 prepaid lasts a year or more.

I am on-line when using my Mac Mini at home; I had fibre installed to my apartment, with the blessing of my landlord.

I bought a MacBook Air last year, mainly for work. I occasionally use it for video calls at home, but have never used it for calls away from home. In general, I have the WiFi on only when I have a need to use it.

When I leave my desk I am usually off-line, and like it to be that way.
 
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Scepticalscribe

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Jul 29, 2008
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The Far Horizon
Excellent thread.

I have an iPhone SE (the nicest by far, to my mind, of the iPhone line up), and, until last year, I had an antique Nokia, which I loved.

In common with almost everyone else who has posted on this thread, I rarely look at my phone when out, it stays in my pocket, and I frequently forget to even bring it with me.

It is for phone calls, texts, WhatsApp (when I am abroad) and - useful - on occasion, for checking things such as bus and train timetables.

Other than that, I rarely use it an hardly ever look at it when outside the house.
 
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subjonas

macrumors 68020
Original poster
Feb 10, 2014
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I agree it's appalling.
Go on a walk anywhere where people are mingling about and more often than not most are staring at their phones.
It happens at the beach too.
I think it has become a bit of an addiction and people don't care one bit.
Ive never consciously thought I shouldn't take my phone out of my pocket because it will interrupt the real world. I think that's a sign of fighting an addiction too. But fight on.
I don’t want to make assumptions or project on others, but I agree everyone is always on their phone and they can’t all be doing something terribly important all the time. I have no qualms using my phone when I feel I need to, but once in awhile I catch myself doing something that doesn’t really need to be done in that moment or at all, and I put the phone back in the pocket and focus on what’s around.

That's the reason why I would prefer using a cellular Apple Watch as personal cellular device. It's going in that direction. Still connected, but less distractions.
That’s a little too extreme for me, but I respect that. I do use my phone for productivity often, so I feel I still need the phone’s screen. Maybe someday if Siri is more like Jarvis I can switch to just a wearable.

I don't own a smartphone and seldom carry the cheap Nokia that I do own. I got it because I don't have a phone line to my apartment...... My mobile phone usually sits on top of the fridge, and $25 prepaid lasts a year or more.

I am on-line when using my Mac Mini at home; I had fibre installed to my apartment, with the blessing of my landlord.

I bought a MacBook Air last year, mainly for work. I occasionally use it for video calls at home, but have never used it for calls away from home. In general, I have the WiFi on only when I have a need to use it.

When I leave my desk I am usually off-line, and like it to be that way.
Have only what you need and cut out the rest—I like it. Although I couldn’t go as extreme for my needs. But I do wish our devices weren’t so dependent on the internet. I would rather all my data be stored locally, and all selective data syncing and backup be done automatically via local wifi. But then companies would lose out on cloud/service subscriptions...

Not I. I’ll use my phone as much as I need.
Me too! It’s the using it when I don’t need that’s the issue.
 

le.bouch

macrumors regular
Aug 3, 2010
154
66
As others have noted, this is precisely why I got a cellular Apple Watch. iPhone stays in my pocket unless absolutely necessary.
 
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jimmy_uk

macrumors 6502a
Oct 19, 2015
884
791
UK
I might check my phone when in a large shop queue but only briefly. I want to be aware of my surroundings at all times.

In the UK people who use their phones when driving is on a heavy increase in my observations, and now everyone walking down the street, waiting at a bus stop, walking with their children etc are head down in their phones at all times.

I was trying to navigate a busy multi-storey car park yesterday and despite there being many pedestrian areas this one woman was on another planet on her phone walking in front of traffic. And no-one challenges it.

Similarly while in a town centre I have to be the one looking were I'm going in order to navigate around all the phone zombies. Sure they glance up occasionally but their not looking, the minds are elsewhere and their faces expressionless.
 
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DerwentG

macrumors newbie
Sep 21, 2019
7
6
I used my XS Max a lot more when I had it. After switching to a used iPhone X, my screen time dropped drastically and it became more of a communication device for me than anything else. I googled less stuff on the go, and spent more time just thinking, reflecting and watching people.
 
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sunapple

macrumors 68000
Jul 16, 2013
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In the past 7 years of owning an iPhone, I've managed to get by without a data plan (4G). I enjoy my phone at home, I enjoy watching downloaded Netflix on-the-go (train) or listening to offline Apple Music with AirPods. At work or at school, I have Wi-Fi. But when I'm out, I'm never bothered by notifications from news, WhatsApp or otherwise; it's great.

It is becoming increasingly less practical to be 'disconnected' and pricing of data plans are no longer that high (although I'm still saving a lot of money). I do however enjoy the moments of silence, every time I walk out the door.
 

wba1990

macrumors 6502
Oct 1, 2015
334
146
Birmingham, England
I might check my phone when in a large shop queue but only briefly. I want to be aware of my surroundings at all times.

In the UK people who use their phones when driving is on a heavy increase in my observations, and now everyone walking down the street, waiting at a bus stop, walking with their children etc are head down in their phones at all times.

I was trying to navigate a busy multi-storey car park yesterday and despite there being many pedestrian areas this one woman was on another planet on her phone walking in front of traffic. And no-one challenges it.

Similarly while in a town centre I have to be the one looking were I'm going in order to navigate around all the phone zombies. Sure they glance up occasionally but their not looking, the minds are elsewhere and their faces expressionless.
Nothing better than someone being on their phone, they then walk into you as not paying any attention of their surrounds and they then give you a deathly stare for walking into them!
 
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cics

macrumors regular
Dec 6, 2016
102
59
Milano
In the UK people who use their phones when driving is on a heavy increase in my observations, and now everyone walking down the street, waiting at a bus stop, walking with their children etc are head down in their phones at all times.
Same in Italy. I drive 2 hours every day to commute to my workplace, and I see tens and tens of people driving while looking down at their phones.

That’s a little too extreme for me, but I respect that. I do use my phone for productivity often, so I feel I still need the phone’s screen. Maybe someday if Siri is more like Jarvis I can switch to just a wearable.
Yep, using for productivity doesn't make sense... maybe just for phonecalls or checking calendar events. But as a personal device I think it can do a great job job: you stay connected, you communicate, and so on in a very personal and discreet way. I love it.
 

jimmy_uk

macrumors 6502a
Oct 19, 2015
884
791
UK
Same in Italy. I drive 2 hours every day to commute to my workplace, and I see tens and tens of people driving while looking down at their phones.



Yep, using for productivity doesn't make sense... maybe just for phonecalls or checking calendar events. But as a personal device I think it can do a great job job: you stay connected, you communicate, and so on in a very personal and discreet way. I love it.
What I'm seeing the most now is people who are driving that stop at traffic lights, sitting in minor traffic or even at a junction for just 2 seconds then they feel the need to look at their phones. How the hell do they think this is acceptable when they have no idea what's going on around them? They trick themselves into believing they're paying attention by looking up occasionally but you can see its just a reflex and their not actually looking. Then the lights change or the traffic moves and they sit there because they've not noticed. Idiots.
 
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CrazyForCashews

macrumors 6502a
Apr 1, 2018
511
1,057
Human beings are devolving ever since the smartphone era.

People are hunched over and looking down on their phones 24/7, it's only a matter of time until we go full ape again.
 

sjperformance

macrumors 6502a
Oct 7, 2013
581
361
Miami 305
For me its the other way around. At home I use my phone less. I depend heavily on my phone for work. I run a successful business from 3 warehouses. At home usually on iPad for viewing. Or 75'' sammy on my living room wall. Or 60'' sammy in my master room.
 

jr866gooner

macrumors 65816
Aug 24, 2013
1,441
304
Use it sparingly outside in public. I'll happily take a picture or two. Especially if my children are happy and playing but I'm more conscious of someone being able to steal my phone!!