Anyone have experience with anxiety/depression?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by kmj2318, Mar 6, 2015.

  1. kmj2318 macrumors 68000

    kmj2318

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    #1
    I've been struggling with this for my whole life and I'm getting worse as time goes by. I always thought that one day I'll "arrive" and be in a place where I'm comfortable. But time keeps moving and I feel like key points in my life are passing me by. I haven't even socialized with a single person since about August, not counting transactional exchanges that I have to have with grocery cashiers or family members.

    I'm not sure what to do, or how to fix it. Has any body else had experience with mental health issues that they might want to share? Such as what you or someone you knew had to go through or recover from. Or advice for someone struggling. Thank you.
     
  2. Meister Suspended

    Meister

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2013
    #2
    Solution:
    Anxious? --> have a beer or two
    Depressed? --> drink a strong cup of coffe

    ----------

    Not gonna happen. Life's uncomfortable. Have a cigar! ;)

    ----------

    That is what time does. it passes.

    ----------

    I know that having to deal with cashiers and family members sucks, but at least you don't seem to have to go to work. I wish I wouldn't have to talk to anyone.


    Eat and steak and have a cigar. Enjoy:)
     
  3. torana355 macrumors 68020

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    #3
    My only advise is to not touch ANY Benzodiazepine that a doctor may subscribe you. I went through 8 years of hell due to that that evil drug.
     
  4. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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    #4
    I have always arrived, I cannot remember a day in my life when I didn't feel right at home. I knew that I was accepted, my place in the sun was waiting for me. It didn't matter if it was the play group, or school or university, I just knew that this was were I was meant to be at that time.
    In my 70 years on this earth, I can only remember one time when I thought that the world was a cold and dark place, that was when my first wife died. But my children got me going again, and although there was a empty place in my heart I was a better person for have had her in my life.

    My motto is go with the flow.
     
  5. sdilley14 macrumors 65816

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    Mesa, AZ
    #5
    My only advice would be to speak with a professional to help sort out your feelings and get properly diagnosed.

    I've struggled with depression at times in my life. And I still deal with some social anxiety. I'm much better now than I used to be - but looking back, I wish I would have been more proactive and gotten professional assistance.
     
  6. Mr. McMac Suspended

    Mr. McMac

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    #6
    I take .5mg's of Xanax once in a while when I'm feeling the rare cases of extreme anxiety. That being said, I have at least 60 out of the 90 my doctor prescribed to me well over a year ago.
     
  7. A.Goldberg macrumors 68000

    A.Goldberg

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    #7
    Excellent advice. I am a pharmacist who specializes in psychiatric medicine. There is a lot of controversy over psych medicine and I can tell you much of what you hear is flakey research or myth. The majority of medications out there are very safe and typically those crazy stories have other circumstances in play. Benzodiazepines are one class of drugs where the stories you hear should be listened to. Benzos should be used as a last chance effort.

    Benzodiazepines have their use in a limited number of cases but should never be taken as a long term solution. Anxiety, in a case like yours, is not going to disappear on its own and is something you will have to deal with for the rest of your life to one extent or another. Only by modifying the way you think/process emotion will you be able to achieve long term reduction.

    Benzodiazepines will lose their efficacy if taken regularly after just a couple weeks aka tolerance. Some people say they've taken them for 5 years and haven't changed their dose. There are some rare people who don't form tolerance, but the placebo effect in medication, especially psychiatric, is incredible. These medications are also highly addictive and abusable. I have seen many people's lives destroyed by taking these medications through addiction. I've had patients who went from business executives, doctors, and lawyers to being literally broke and homeless. Other patients report just "not caring" about anything and letting their work and social lives fall apart. Many GP's will prescribe these like candy. More responsible, savvy psychiatrists limit how often they give them out. There are much safer methods available that should be utilized before using Benzos.

    Also related to Benzodiazepines are hypnotics like Ambien. Both Ambien and your other Benzos are often prescribed for sleep (Xanax, Valium, Ativan, etc). The stories about people doing crazy stuff in their sleep is also true with Ambien. If you have depression/anxiety related insomnia there are much more effective and safer options available. The stories about people doing crazy stuff in their sleep is rare, but does happen.

    The major antidepressants like used today like SSRI's, SNRI's, NDRI's, and tricyclics are all very safe for the majority of patients. If you choose to take medication a good psychiatrist will consider your needs and other conditions (if any) and find something that he thinks will work best. The first choice doesn't always work out, or the second, but you have a lot of options. Many of the drugs do take a while to take effect, but the more you stick with it the less waiting time there will be if you switch medications.

    As I mentioned in my private message to you, medication can only take you so far. They are an aid. The true work should be done with a therapist, psychologist, or psychiatrist to help figure out what is going on and to help you through your problems. I am a big fan of CBT (cognitive behavioral therapy). Medications can help reduce symptoms to help you get back on your feet. They do not solve the problem though.

    It's too often we look for the solution in a pill. The drugs may be part of the solution, but with everything in life, nothing is free and you have to put in some level of work to get a result.

    The first thing you have to do though is meet with a mental health professional and start from there. It's not an easy thing to ask for help with, it's not easy to live with it, but you can achieve recovery and it will be worth it for sure.
     
  8. Huntn, Mar 7, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 8, 2015

    Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #8
    Sounds like sound advice.
     
  9. torana355 macrumors 68020

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    Sydney, Australia
    #9
    Yeah i learnt the hard way, i was subscribed 1Mg of Xanax once a day by a doctor, at the time i was amazed how good i felt i could finally function properly. After a few years i slowly started needing more and more Xanax to feel normal until one day ( 6 years later) i hit tolerance and started suffering from withdrawal symptoms even when i took 2mg of Xanax.

    Then the horrible experience of tapering off the Xanax began, i have never felt so bad in my life, the initial anxiety that lead me to take Xanax paled in comparison to the hell i went though. It took me close to 2 years to finally start to feel normal again, much of that time i was confined to my room as i could not go out in public easily, i was extremely lucky to be able to work though that period as i could hardly drive due to extreme dizziness. Even after 2 years since my last Xanax im still not 100%. My best advise is to see a really good psychiatrist, if the first one you see doesn't help try another till you find a good one.
     
  10. A.Goldberg macrumors 68000

    A.Goldberg

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    #10
    You're story is not uncommon. Benzo's are one of the hardest substances to stay off of. You're lucky that your situation didn't lead to injury and that you were able to successfully detox. For many people addiction takes it hold and its a battle that can last a lifetime.

    This week I had a patient in his low twenties. He was on very high does of Xanax that an irresponsible doctor prescribed. He ran out, had a seizure (withdrawel symptom), knocked himself out, and landed in a fashion gave him compartment syndrome. Google (+image search) it if you don't know what it is. It can be deadly, extremely painful, and now his arm is a mangled mess. They relieve the pressure by cutting DEEP incisions all the way down the arm, and then stitching it all back together.

    I'm not sure if you're disagreeing with what I mentioned prior to that but working in psychiatry work a lot in addiction treatment. I can tell you as someone that helps clean up the mess, these drugs are dangerous and to seek other alternatives. Specific medicines are necessary where they're necessary, but this is likely a case where there are safer, more effective long term options. Benzos are prescribed because they are very effective. But in the long term they are not and the stakes are high. I hope the OP decides seek out treatment. If he/she does, they are allowed and should be active in their treatment.
     
  11. fitshaced macrumors 68000

    fitshaced

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    Jul 2, 2011
    #11
    From what I have read, depression is incidental. It probably exists because of your anxiety. That too could be incidental of something else but is also sometimes hereditary.

    My advice is to accept that you have the potential to do what you want, you have the courage to accept critisism and the desire to be happy. Medication cannot give you those things, it can only synthesise emotions and help you get through your day until the time comes when you become immune to the dosage and need to re-evaluate it.

    I read 'The Brothers K' not so long ago and one of the characters in it was a very jolly and positive guy. The narrator described him as someone who was never embarrassed by his own mistakes or anyone else's. That struck me as something I wanted to be. Why would it matter if I made a mistake? From experience, a mistake only becomes truly embarrassing when you try to cover it up. But we avoid situations where we think we're likely to make mistakes as we don't wish to 'open our mouth and remove all doubt' so to speak. By behaving that way, we will always be the fool or weakling we see ourselves as because we don't allow ourselves to experience. If we think we're expected to be more capable than we are, we are living our lives in the expectancy of others. Its then more their life than ours.
     
  12. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #12
    I was agreeing on with what I bolded. Don't know enough about the other to comment. :)
     
  13. AngerDanger macrumors 68030

    AngerDanger

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    #13
    First, I'd like to explain one potential version of depression, so that members who haven't had it can get some idea of what it's like: imagine that every little soundbite, motto, mantra, or comforting notion no longer works for you. You tell yourself things are basically going to be tolerable—hell, you might even believe it—but that idea isn't enough to help you feel less despondent.

    As for your situation, kmj, it sounds familiar. I'm of the belief that I was wrong about arrival, and that people who arrived never felt as though they needed to. This isn't to say that people who don't feel horrible are somehow living facile existences, but simply that their journeys (to use a trite metaphor) don't involve perpetual, inexplicable sadness or discomfort.

    I'd also like to share my least favorite piece of unsolicited advice: you have to do what you're passionate about. It's actually really nice sounding until you realize that it's akin to running out of gas, having somebody pull over to help, and then them saying "Yeah, you should drive to the nearest gas station". If I could either drive to a station or find passion, I bloody well would've.

    It could be easy to attempt to argue away others' depression by pointing out times during which they don't seem depressed, but it's easy to smile even when living isn't your cup of tea. It's easy to do a lot of things while miserable. I'm having trouble finding the source of the statistic, but apparently 25% of suicides are committed by people who show no warning signs.

    I have no idea how recover from any variant of depression (excluding the ones that react to medication), but I can find resonance with the songs of They Might Be Giants. Seriously. 30ccs is the recommended dose, but your results may will vary. They might just be off-putting.
     
  14. Gutwrench macrumors 65816

    Gutwrench

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  15. A.Goldberg, Mar 8, 2015
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2015

    A.Goldberg macrumors 68000

    A.Goldberg

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    #15
    No problem.

    Sorry if it seemed like I went off on you. I wasn't sure if your post (which I now see you've modified) was like **** you only her doctor can decide... which is true (and I now understand this was not your intention)

    BUT, there is a lot of irresponsible prescribing with benzos (and a lot of other drugs as you may know/see/hear). It's really a travesty for our society and that was my point.

    Though I am a "drug doctor" (or "drug dealer" in other contexts), I am one who believes less is more when it comes to medication, especially in a case like this. Eating healthy, exercising, therapy, and peer support I think is essential. Medication can help aid the process and relieve some of the symptoms. It won't solve the problem but it can help get you started.

    In a lot of cases I'm not a strong supporter of alternative medicine, it depends on the case and what the treatment is. The evidence for a lot of things just isn't there, or theoretically it's plausible but the effects are not as good. Just because something is "natural" doesn't mean it works better, is safer, or any more "natural" than taking a chemically synthesized drug. That said, I personally have found Yoga, Acupuncture, and light box therapy to be very effective, both personally speaking, statistically speaking, and based on experience from patients and other professionals.

    Now that daylight savings time is in effect (or off, whichever way it goes), the days will be longer. Hopefully that will be another small thing that might help improve how you are feeling. I am greatly affected by DST in the fall- my sleep becomes messed up for weeks, my ability wake up is vastly diminished when it's dark out, and my mood dips and consequently my chronic back pain increases. Everything goes out of whack. The spring though with more sunlight and better weather makes things much better.
     
  16. lowendlinux Contributor

    lowendlinux

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    #16
    Yes and like others said stay away from anti-depressants and booze tried them both for years neither helped.
     
  17. twietee macrumors 603

    twietee

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    #17
    Just a brief post since I haven't read / understood all of it and won't even try to explain that in depth in English but I had some problems being depressed (often completely 'out of the blue').

    Short preface: I always knew about having a 'minor' defect (it's not a sickness) with how my liver worked, it's called Morbus Meulengracht (guess Gilbert's syndrom in English). Knew that since I was a child. It just happened that it took about ~27 years until a doc told me some side effect could be depression and being phlegmatic (sp?)- since it never really did anything obvious in my life, except having yellowish eyes after drinking much too much, I never 'googled' that on my own either.

    So, in the end there isn't really anything you can do against that except living 'healthy' - as in take your meals properly, don't abuse (too many :D) drugs, sports and so on. That helped tremendously! Just the knowledge about where this came from solved this problem for me - and I wish I knew that during puberty :( :)

    Not saying this counts for all and everybody, but it seems to occur rather often (wiki says ~8%, more males).

    Just saying,
     
  18. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #18
    Seems like a lot of people try to cheer themselves up with alcohol. I think it disrupts the concerned circuits for a time. ;)
     
  19. lowendlinux Contributor

    lowendlinux

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    #19
    For me it was sleep not cheer. I still have issues sleeping but now I just stay awake rather than go through a 750 of something.
     
  20. A.Goldberg, Mar 9, 2015
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2015

    A.Goldberg macrumors 68000

    A.Goldberg

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    #20
    There is a difference between antidepressants and benzodiazepine anxiolytics. Antidepressants will help with depression (and in some cases anxiety too) and deal mostly with serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine (and really all neurotransmitters but some more than others so for the sake of classification they generalize). Benzodiazepines with treat only anxiety and deal with GABA (gamma ambunobuteric acid). This will not really depression unless the anxiety is solely caused by the anxiety, but usually solving one doesn't entirely and immediately fix the other.

    I am not a fan of the Xanax, Valiums, Ativans, etc of the world. (And in a way aren't much more than alcohol in a pill). They are addictive, have terrible withdrawal symptoms and severe withdrawal can be life threatening.


    Addiction and dependence both cause withdrawal if you abruptly stop. The difference is, dependence will just make you uncomfortable. Addiction will make you sell your soul to get more. Most drugs in one way or another cause dependence in one way or another, again meaning quick discontinuation will lead a rebound of symptoms along with other symptoms.

    Point of confusion: Many of the common benzo's end with -pam. Examples: lorazepam (Ativan), diazepam (Valium), and klonopin (clonazepam). All drugs that end in pam are not benzos, such as the commonly prescribed SSRI antidepressants citalopram (Celexa) and escitalaopram (Lexapro). The two are isomers of each other, safe to take, good antidepressants with good anxiolytic properties. They are not however benzodiazepines and do not have the problems associated.

    But, as I said before. Generally, medications are an aid, not the answer.
     
  21. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #21
    I'll argue that would be a fitful sleep.
     
  22. lowendlinux Contributor

    lowendlinux

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    #22
    It is but some is better than none. There's a long spiel about why but I went from self medicating, to doctor medicated, back to self medicated, to running my a$$ off anytime I feel it coming on. The drugs didn't work, the booze didn't work so now I in essence try to beat it out of my mind it's healthier and won't land me in the drunk tank so I call it a win.
     
  23. srltzz342 macrumors member

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    Oct 2, 2014
    #23
    Sounds like you're not gelling.

    But seriously, I would advise talking to a professional, and going out to meet some people. Reconnect with friends from college or high school. Sign up for eHarmony, or something like that. I've heard of great healthy relationships that can come from online dating.

    Just don't try online dating on Craigslist....
     
  24. obeygiant macrumors 68040

    obeygiant

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    #24
    There is a forum similar to this one that focuses on the treatment of anxiety and depression:

    http://www.crazymeds.us/CrazyTalk/

    the name is a little funny but there is some interesting information in there if you look.
     
  25. lowercaseperson macrumors 6502

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    Oct 5, 2006
    #25
    There is a fair amount of research to support the idea the regular moderate physical exercise helps in a variety of ways. I've always been a very anxious person and it only got worse when I got into medical school - I try to avoid medication if I can, so I did some research and started running. I honestly feel like it has helped me, but it took a while to make me feel better mentally and physically. I've been running steadily for about 15 months now. I actually started out REALLY REALLY slow - like 1.5 miles in 20 minutes. For comparison I run 6-10 miles a week now (I know it isn't much)...but it has helped me.

    Some people won't feel "good enough" simply by adding things like exercise and hobbies, but it is definitely a evidence based way to attack anxiety/depression on a multimodal front...which appears to be key.

    If adding regular exercise and hobbies aren't enough, find a trained medical professional. Actually, the best option might simply to find a medical professional now and talk it out with them. I guess they point I'm trying to make is: drugs can *help* but won't be 100% effective, and there are simple things you can do to help the efficacy of medication. Find a professional that will actually listen to you, not just try and push a drug. My 2 cents.
     

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