Apple Adding iPhone 5 and Additional Macs to Pilot Program Allowing Repairs of Select 'Vintage' Products

Discussion in 'MacRumors.com News Discussion' started by MacRumors, Nov 1, 2018.

  1. MacRumors macrumors bot

    MacRumors

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    Normally, an Apple product becomes vintage once five years have passed since it was last manufactured, meaning that Apple Stores and Apple Authorized Service Providers (AASPs) will no longer repair or service the product.

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    In late January, however, Apple launched a pilot program that permits Apple Stores and AASPs to continue servicing select vintage products, subject to parts availability. The program started in the United States and Turkey with the Mid 2011 iMac and expanded worldwide with the 2012 MacBook Air in August.

    Now, Apple is further expanding the program to include the iPhone 5, which became vintage on Wednesday. In an internal document, Apple says Apple Stores and AASPs worldwide are authorized to continue servicing the CDMA variant of the device through October 31, 2020, and the GSM variant through December 30, 2020.

    Apple's internal document, obtained by MacRumors from multiple sources, also outlines other soon-to-be vintage iPhones and Macs that will also be added to the pilot program at various dates throughout the remainder of this year:

    Effective November 30, 2018:iPhone 4S
    MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2012)
    Effective December 30, 2018:MacBook Pro (13-inch, Retina, Late 2012)
    MacBook Pro (13-inch, Retina, Early 2013)
    MacBook Pro (15-inch, Retina, Mid 2012)
    MacBook Pro (15-inch, Retina, Early 2013)
    Mac Pro (Mid 2012)If parts are unavailable for a specific repair for these vintage products, Apple Stores and AASPs are instructed to decline service. This is a pilot program to begin with, so it is subject to change or end at any time.

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    The exact reason for the pilot program is unclear, beyond Apple apparently having a surplus of service parts for these specific vintage products. Apple's internal document states that inventory of service parts will not be replenished, so repairs under the pilot program are certainly not guaranteed.

    Article Link: Apple Adding iPhone 5 and Additional Macs to Pilot Program Allowing Repairs of Select 'Vintage' Products
     
  2. logics8 macrumors member

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    #2
    Must be all the people "Trading in" Their computers for $50 credit?
     
  3. keysofanxiety, Nov 1, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2018

    keysofanxiety macrumors G3

    keysofanxiety

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    Oh no, my trusty 15” 2012 finally becomes obsolete at the end of this year. Wow, it’s been that long. It’s like waking up one day and realising you’ve been with the same woman for 14 years. :(

    She’s been a good workhorse and I’d hate it when she finally dies. The laptop that is, not the wife.
     
  4. radio893fm macrumors regular

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    #4
    I can't go pass the "vintage" word. I keep thinking about Mac IIs, Commodore 64s and Vic 20s, etc.
     
  5. macduke macrumors G3

    macduke

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    I gave my mid-2012 rMBP to my grandpa recently. The only thing wrong with it is the display is a little wobbly and probably needs tightening up. It was never the same after I sent it in to Apple for them to swap that LG display that had image retention issues with the Samsung panel that didn't. But it got a little more wobbly over the years. Wonder if that's a cheap fix at the store before it goes vintage or if I can quickly do it myself?
     
  6. now i see it macrumors 68030

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    #6
    This is a good scheme by  to sell excess inventory of old parts they'd normally toss in the trash
     
  7. keysofanxiety macrumors G3

    keysofanxiety

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    #7
    In my experience, the Apple Store will tighten the display for free, even if you’re not in warranty.

    I guess it depends how busy they are and how chirpy you are, though.
     
  8. kemal macrumors 65816

    kemal

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    #8
    It is certainly better than sending the spare parts to the grinder.
     
  9. Apache1 macrumors member

    Apache1

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    #9
    At 20 years you realize what a sacrifice is was for her to stay with you for so long that you were the lucky one. And for my 2012 MBP I decided to have Apple replace the battery instead of buying the new one. So far I have bought one new power cord and one battery service and its running great. I really like the new Macbook Air though, should be just enough power for some light CAD type stuff.
     
  10. jonnysods macrumors 603

    jonnysods

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    This is pretty impressive. There's no reason to still repair these. I think that's awesome.
     
  11. macduke macrumors G3

    macduke

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    Good to know. Maybe the next time I'm buying something I'll just go to the store and that might help increase my odds too. Unfortunately the store is ~120 miles to the east and west so it's not always convenient to pop in.
     
  12. charlituna macrumors G3

    charlituna

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    There’s rarely spare parts to send. During the 1 year period where they have to have parts for Turkey cause laws and the 2 years they have to have parts for California cause laws (which by the by have been that way for like 10 years so 2011 and this program have nothing to do with those areas) they have vastly slowed down production of parts or even just substitute other parts. Hard drives in particular are an item that will often get a substitute. Let’s say you bought the 2011 with a 250GB drive and they discontinued that drive with the next model, making the base 320GB. If you brought in a 2011 bought in one of those areas for service (which also has to be in that same area) and it needed a new hard drive they would simply use the 320GB for the same repair cost. Similar things have happened with folks in California bringing in a 6 year old iPhone 4 and getting a 4s as the replacement.
     
  13. ThunderSkunk macrumors 68030

    ThunderSkunk

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    Since they’ve failed to produce an updated model of 17” MacBook Pro, they could extend repairs to the existing ones out there (prone to overheating as they are) as a show of meeting those customers halfway, rather than just writing off those users altogether and sending them off to HP and Acer.
     
  14. barkomatic macrumors 68040

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    #14
    Hmmmm. $129 for an out of warranty screen repair on an iPhone 5. I have a vintage condition 5 (except for the purple hue screen) and it might be fun to restore it with OEM parts and service while I can.
     
  15. justperry macrumors G3

    justperry

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    My mid 2012 MBP 13" is still good until 2021, it's the one without the retina display, was on sale till Oct. 2016.
    Kinda odd that a lesser Mac will be supported longer.
     
  16. ghostface147 macrumors 68030

    ghostface147

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    #16
    My 2011 17" MB Pro went for $300 when I was considering trading it in for a 2018 MB Pro. Got a little higher somewhere else. So as we all know, they retain their value well.
     
  17. PSCConMP macrumors newbie

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    #17
    The MacPro (late 2103) that is currently sold will be old enough to be considered vintage in about one year!
     
  18. TVreporter macrumors regular

    TVreporter

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    #18
    I got a 2011 iMac with a dead graphics card - wasn’t aware of the repair program until after the fact. Never received any notification from Apple about it.
     
  19. sigsegv macrumors member

    sigsegv

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    I wonder if this has anything to do with the bad rap Apple is getting from the “right to repair” crowd. One of the RTR arguments is that Apple won’t fix them (which is ok), but Apple also makes life difficult for non-authorized repairers in obtaining non-official parts, component diagrams, etc.

    And on that front I tend to agree. Seems that Apple likes that products become obsolete and unrepairable as that drives sales of newer items.
     
  20. az431 macrumors 6502a

    az431

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    Figures someone would dig deep to find something wrong with this.
     
  21. keysofanxiety macrumors G3

    keysofanxiety

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    #21
    Yeah, just the way it is though. If they kept selling the 15” cMBP a little longer, that would have been the same.

    Tbh I was happy to see the 13” go. As a laptop it was great but in the service industry for a DSA reseller, students would gravitate to the model which was £100 or so cheaper and then complain to me when it was running slowly - as they just understood price point, rather than HDD vs SSD, and how painfully unoptimised OS X was for HDDs.

    “It’s a Mac, it shouldn’t take 1 minute to boot, it’s your fault! You’ve done something to it.” Urgh. They saw more storage, less price, and went for that.

    It was such a pain in my butt I wrote a buyer’s guide on the website to explain why the 13” Retina was so much better for everything they needed to do, to hopefully ensure nobody bought one again, unless they buy an SSD and we fit it.

    One of the toilet brush students bought the 13” AND bought an Apple BTO SSD upgrade. I was mortified because not only did they pay double the price than we quoted for the SSD (Apple knew what they’re doing with upgrades, we didn’t apparently), but it ended up more expensive than the 13” Retina with the same storage, better battery life, better screen, thinner, lighter... AND still cheaper if you threw in an Apple USB ODD.

    Sorry, unrelated. Just got some PTSD. I love the laptop but hate what it caused me. So pleased I’ve been free of that job for nearly 2 years.
     
  22. Scooz macrumors regular

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  23. Never mind macrumors 6502

    Never mind

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    I wonder if Louis Rossmann is listening ?
     
  24. sigsegv macrumors member

    sigsegv

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    No doubt he is.

    My own experience (and I’ve owned more Apple products that I can remember; since the Apple II and original Mac) is that Apple has become way more rigid and mercenary in their repairs. I hate the Genius Bar.

    I recall taking a PowerBook back to Apple for keyboard repair way back when, and they walked me out the back while they robbed parts from a donor machine and put them in mine - I was in and out in less than 15 minutes.

    Yes, Apple actually used to do that.
     
  25. keysofanxiety macrumors G3

    keysofanxiety

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    Louis Rossmann is an self-inflated pompous goon who lambasts Apple for all these practices, whilst simultaneously ignoring that every other OEM he defends does exactly the same thing.

    If you’re catering for consumer repairs, or even professional repairs, there isn’t a company out there that would carry out on-the-spot component level solder (sorry, SODDER) repairs.

    I used to love his channel as it was interesting, really impressive, and sure, he had a whinge about Apple. Now all his videos are nothing but anti-Apple clickbait to rile up the natives and get more money.
     

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