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Back in June at WWDC, Apple announced several changes to its handling of App Store review, noting that it would in most cases no longer hold up bug fix updates over violations of App Store guidelines, and that it would allow developers to challenge existing guidelines.

app-store-on-ios-13.jpg

In a note to developers today, Apple confirmed that those two changes have been implemented, encouraging developers to suggest changes to guidelines and Apple's development platforms.
For apps that are already on the App Store, bug fixes will no longer be delayed over guideline violations except for those related to legal issues. You'll instead be able to address guideline violations in your next submission. And now, in addition to appealing decisions about whether an app violates guidelines, you can suggest changes to the guidelines. We also encourage you to submit your App Store and Apple development platform suggestions so we can continue to improve experiences for the developer community.
Apple has been involved in a number of notable App Store controversies in recent months, from the Hey email app rejection to the battle with Epic Games, while regulators have also been taking a look at Apple's policies regarding App Store commissions and exclusive control over app distribution.

Article Link: Apple Confirms New App Store Policies on Bug Fix Updates and Challenging Guidelines Are Live
 
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FaustsHausUK

macrumors 6502
Mar 11, 2010
453
900
Chicago, IL
Better late than never. They should also be more transparent about their cuts and fees so armchair pundits aren't speculating - if their 30% provides value, it should be easy to demonstrate.

I wonder if they will start to ask their users for input on key topics, too. Their total headlock on game streaming services is going to cause more and more tension as the next gen services come online.
 
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ruka.snow

macrumors 68000
Jun 6, 2017
1,639
4,360
Scotland
Apple should update the policy that requires developers to explain EXACTLY which bugs were fixed. They shouldn't be able to get away with "bug fixes and improvements" as the only reasoning for update.

Oh don't say that... how will Microsoft get their almost weekly MS Outlook update out if they have to actually write what they changed?
 

Beeplance

macrumors 68000
Jul 29, 2012
1,564
500
Apple should update the policy that requires developers to explain EXACTLY which bugs were fixed. They shouldn't be able to get away with "bug fixes and improvements" as the only reasoning for update.

Agree. Every update of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram etc all "bug fixes and improvements" that says absolutely nothing I need to know. If you don't tell me what you fix, ain't no reason for me to update a perfectly working app.

Apps like Reddit, Apollo, Telegram, and others actually put in the effort to state all their fixes and new features in their changelog. I appreciate those developers who are transparent about their fixes and actually highlight what's patched to users.
 

recoil80

macrumors 68040
Jul 16, 2014
3,111
2,753
Apple should update the policy that requires developers to explain EXACTLY which bugs were fixed. They shouldn't be able to get away with "bug fixes and improvements" as the only reasoning for update.

Explain to who, the final users?
Why would they care about technical details?
If all I did was bugfix, that's what I write in the changelog. If it is something a user could notice, I may want to point it out, especially if it was something I got a review about, but if I solved a weird crash that happened to a small amount of users, why should I explain it?
 

VolceOntra

macrumors 6502
Apr 25, 2007
320
82
Explain to who, the final users?
Why would they care about technical details?
If all I did was bugfix, that's what I write in the changelog. If it is something a user could notice, I may want to point it out, especially if it was something I got a review about, but if I solved a weird crash that happened to a small amount of users, why should I explain it?

Because when that happens on weekly basis and then all the users are required to download the app again, it gets pretty annoying. More so, if the user is experiencing some of the bugs - it gives a false sense of hope that the bug fixes will address what they are experiencing.

I don't think the list needs to be comprehensive or overly technical, but communicating to your end users is always a good thing.
 
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sfwalter

macrumors 68020
Jan 6, 2004
2,085
1,609
Dallas Texas
Literally just had an app update that was intended to fix some UI bugs rejected for features they already approved in previous versions.

That is the frustrating part. When you have different reviewers reviewing different versions of an app. It's like calling up customer service for your utility provider. You have to keep calling until you get a correct answer.

Apple needs to revamp its app reviewer training process. They also need to stop reviewing mundane issues such as color choices or other design-related.
 
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Darrell

macrumors newbie
Jul 19, 2002
2
1
Delta Airlines
Apple should update the policy that requires developers to explain EXACTLY which bugs were fixed. They shouldn't be able to get away with "bug fixes and improvements" as the only reasoning for update.
This is difficult to implement. Not every shop has a dedicated QA Team or separate team to build test harness. Sometimes bugs seem to be addressed only to find there is an edge case where bug appears. You report it as fixed and it’s not under all situations. If you have a responsive app or one with different UI and UX for every device you could easily miss something. So what you end up with is angry users. As a user and developer. I know this sounds like a weak response as someone could say, list them anyway but in doing so there is a liability associated with it. This has never been due to laziness on any team I’ve been associated with.

If big listings become a requirement you put Apple in the position of QA. If they don’t test everything throughly then become part of the problem. Apps get rejected, no way for developers to get appropriate feedback, release cycles grow, it just gets worse not better. Talk to your app developer if you have feedback. They should listen. Most do. you will find they appreciate your help and can get it fixed and pushed out quicker.
 
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Darrell

macrumors newbie
Jul 19, 2002
2
1
Delta Airlines
Because when that happens on weekly basis and then all the users are required to download the app again, it gets pretty annoying. More so, if the user is experiencing some of the bugs - it gives a false sense of hope that the bug fixes will address what they are talking about.

I don't think the list needs to be comprehensive or overly technical, but communicating to your end users is always a good thing.
Features get pushed to, not just bug fixes. Depending on the app, there are many factors that play into development cycles. User feedback, competitive reasons, opportunity, staffing, calendering etc. Getting builds to the store isn’t a single step. All of these areas are part of the decision-making in getting those builds out. Teams work hard to close out bug inventory and merge this into new code. It’s a balance not an Excuse. Remember ships that don’t produce what you as a consumer want or expect won’t survive. You control their market share through downloads not Apple. If bugs aren’t listed but revs are happening at a regular rate be happy you’re getting some innovation too.
 

VolceOntra

macrumors 6502
Apr 25, 2007
320
82
Features get pushed to, not just bug fixes. Depending on the app, there are many factors that play into development cycles. User feedback, competitive reasons, opportunity, staffing, calendering etc. Getting builds to the store isn’t a single step. All of these areas are part of the decision-making in getting those builds out. Teams work hard to close out bug inventory and merge this into new code. It’s a balance not an Excuse. Remember ships that don’t produce what you as a consumer want or expect won’t survive. You control their market share through downloads not Apple. If bugs aren’t listed but revs are happening at a regular rate be happy you’re getting some innovation too.

I've been a Software Engineer for about a decade. I understand the development cycle. Yet, I still value communication to end users. You can both say "WE LAUNCHED FEATURE XYZ!!!" and "We fixed a crash that could occur on workflow XYZ". Like I said, it doesn't have to be exhaustive, but if it's a bug affecting a lot of users, it might be worth point out. To a large portion of customers, I'm guessing saying a generic "We fixed bugs" seem lazy, and it looks like some users on this forum agree.
 

recoil80

macrumors 68040
Jul 16, 2014
3,111
2,753
Because when that happens on weekly basis and then all the users are required to download the app again, it gets pretty annoying. More so, if the user is experiencing some of the bugs - it gives a false sense of hope that the bug fixes will address what they are experiencing.

I don't think the list needs to be comprehensive or overly technical, but communicating to your end users is always a good thing.

Big names like Facebook have weekly releases and I guess most of the times you see the usual "bugfix etc." changelog. To be honest, I turned on automatic updates and I don't really care about what's new. I expect the app to show me a screen if something really important changed when I run it for the first time after the update.
I don't usually decide what to put on the changelog of the stuff I publish on the store, is the client, and they usually ask me to put the "bugfix" message unless there is something worth mentioning, like a new feature.
 
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iOS Geek

macrumors 6502a
Nov 7, 2017
979
1,951
I want them to force developers to use more specific language than "bug fixes and improvements" for 200 updates in a row
Yep...looking at you, Facebook. Especially when compared to other apps, Facebooks updates are pretty sizable...
 

FaustsHausUK

macrumors 6502
Mar 11, 2010
453
900
Chicago, IL
I've been a Software Engineer for about a decade. I understand the development cycle. Yet, I still value communication to end users. You can both say "WE LAUNCHED FEATURE XYZ!!!" and "We fixed a crash that could occur on workflow XYZ". Like I said, it doesn't have to be exhaustive, but if it's a bug affecting a lot of users, it might be worth point out. To a large portion of customers, I'm guessing saying a generic "We fixed bugs" seem lazy, and it looks like some users on this forum agree.

Agreed. If a user is experiencing a specific issue, having it listed (or not) in the release notes is informative and can determine a course of action.
 

PSeg90

macrumors regular
Jul 30, 2020
122
168
St Petersburg, FL
Explain to who, the final users?
Why would they care about technical details?
If all I did was bugfix, that's what I write in the changelog. If it is something a user could notice, I may want to point it out, especially if it was something I got a review about, but if I solved a weird crash that happened to a small amount of users, why should I explain it?
It's as simple as saying "Fixed __ bug that caused app to crash when using >iOS13"
 
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bobmans

macrumors 6502a
Feb 7, 2020
512
1,328
Better late than never. They should also be more transparent about their cuts and fees so armchair pundits aren't speculating - if their 30% provides value, it should be easy to demonstrate.
How so? It's transparant for the developer, which is literally all that's needed.
Are you implying the end user should know what % goes to the developer and what % goes to Apple?

I don't know what % goes to who from anything I buy because it's literally not my business. Imagine going to a store and asking who gets what % off your bill lmao.
 
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