Become a MacRumors Supporter for $25/year with no ads, private forums, and more!
  • Did you order new AirTags? We've opened a dedicated AirTags forum.

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
52,437
14,142
https://www.macrumors.com/images/macrumorsthreadlogodarkd.png


103801-flying_apps.jpg


TechCrunch discusses a picture that is being pieced together from reports from App Store developers suggesting that Apple is looking to crack down on "cookie cutter" iPhone applications that offer little more than could be offered through a web app.
Between the developers I spoke to, the consensus was this: Apple doesn't appear to be opposed to 'app generators' and templates per se, but in the last month or so it has started cracking down on basic applications that are little more than RSS feeds or glorified business cards. In short, Apple doesn't want people using native applications for things that a basic web app could accomplish.
The report offers a lengthy quote from Medialets CEO Eric Litman, who notes that Apple is looking to ensure that iPhone applications offer high-quality experiences that set the iPhone apart from other devices.
Apple wants iPhone apps to be superior to Web experiences because they are extremely sticky and drive people specifically to buy the iPhone over competing smartphone platforms. Apps that are too simple or largely indistinguishable from the Web, other apps or particularly other apps on other platforms send the message to end users that the iPhone app ecosystem might not be particularly special.
In particular, Apple appears to be focusing on submissions from app-building services that utilize only basic templates to generate their products, many of which are little more than spammy regurgitations of Web content. Others involve partnerships with quality content providers but do not offer features that drive a compelling user experience.

According to the report, some app-building services like Appmakr have embraced the shift, working to incorporate more advanced tools such as in-app purchasing, push notifications, and offline access in order to offer the richer experience Apple is looking for. Appmakr hopes that its efforts will not go unnoticed by Apple, allowing it to become a "trusted" developer that could streamline the review process for its applications.

Article Link: Apple Cracking Down on "Cookie Cutter" App Store Applications?
 

atari1356

macrumors 68000
Feb 27, 2004
1,582
32
Good riddance. Will make it easier for people to find real applications and cut down on the clutter.
 
Comment

justflie

macrumors 6502a
Nov 29, 2005
888
1
Red Sox Nation
Good riddance indeed. The store is too crowded with crap. The only way I look for new apps now is the Top 25 list and recommendations from friends and trusted websites. Smack the lazy developers/spammers upside the head and keep the quality stuff easily accessible.
 
Comment

theheadguy

macrumors 65816
Apr 26, 2005
1,139
1,365
california
Notice they didn't start out with these expectations... otherwise the store wouldn't achieve the numbers that it did. Most apps are likely downloaded then deleted within minutes.
 
Comment

Chaszmyr

macrumors 601
Aug 9, 2002
4,267
85
I'm all for keeping clutter out of the App store, as long as Apple doesn't remove things that people actually want under the guise of improving user experience.
 
Comment

Winni

macrumors 68040
Oct 15, 2008
3,207
1,195
Germany.
That news is just another reason not to write software for Apple's iGadgets.

For those who haven't read it yet, I think Paul Graham's essay "Apple's mistake" is a must-read on the topic:

http://www.paulgraham.com/apple.html


Censorship and no competition are never a good thing, no matter how much you guys love Apple.
 
Comment

SolRayz

macrumors 6502a
Jul 5, 2007
686
0
Ft. Lauderdale
That news is just another reason not to write software for Apple's iGadgets.

For those who haven't read it yet, I think Paul Graham's essay "Apple's mistake" is a must-read on the topic:

http://www.paulgraham.com/apple.html

Censorship and no competition are never a good thing, no matter how much you guys love Apple.


You need apple to monitor and triage..I barely go to the appstore because browsing through all the crap is tedious.
Meaningful and useful apps seem harder and harder to find.
 
Comment

AdeFowler

macrumors 68020
Aug 27, 2004
2,288
283
England
Good news. It would have been easier for Apple to welcome this crap just so that they can say 'we've got 200k apps', but they've chosen a smarter route.
 
Comment

nick9191

macrumors 68040
Feb 17, 2008
3,355
173
Britain
That news is just another reason not to write software for Apple's iGadgets.

For those who haven't read it yet, I think Paul Graham's essay "Apple's mistake" is a must-read on the topic:

http://www.paulgraham.com/apple.html


Censorship and no competition are never a good thing, no matter how much you guys love Apple.
Right.. If I own a book shop and choose not to sell Mein Kampf, or own a video store and choose not to sell porn, that is obviously censorship..

And there is no competition at all, your right, theres only 150,000 or so apps.
 
Comment

22Hertz

macrumors regular
Oct 20, 2007
116
0
While this sounds good, it's just another form of control.
Control is a slippery slope
 
Comment

zombitronic

macrumors 65816
Feb 9, 2007
1,116
8
That news is just another reason not to write software for Apple's iGadgets.

For those who haven't read it yet, I think Paul Graham's essay "Apple's mistake" is a must-read on the topic:

http://www.paulgraham.com/apple.html


Censorship and no competition are never a good thing, no matter how much you guys love Apple.

I don't think I've ever read a positive post from you. You tend to read much further into every article to merely fulfill your raging pessimism towards everything Apple.

High standards are not such a bad thing, and Apple is not "anti-competitive" for cracking down on do-nothing apps. Your vision of your Utopian App Store is flooded with crappy software.
 
Comment

johnfrombeyond

macrumors member
Jul 30, 2009
54
92
While this sounds good, it's just another form of control.
Control is a slippery slope


Good, obviously MORE control is needed, at least in this regard.

Rarely does anything worth having get achieved witout traveling down a slippery slope to get there.

As a developer, it's pretty obvious what sort of things I should avoid investing my time in, and what products are perfectly safe from being banned. The rules are clear, I don't have much sympathy for the whiners.

In this case, less is more.
 
Comment

VenusianSky

macrumors 65816
Aug 28, 2008
1,290
47
They should review apps that don't sell a certain quantity in a certain time period. Not saying that they necessarily would be removed, but that should help filter out nonesense apps. Maybe move them to a different section called bargain apps. Sort of like the cheap CD section at a music store.
 
Comment

DanielSw

macrumors 6502
Aug 31, 2009
390
195
Clearwater, FL
That news is just another reason not to write software for Apple's iGadgets.

For those who haven't read it yet, I think Paul Graham's essay "Apple's mistake" is a must-read on the topic:

http://www.paulgraham.com/apple.html


Censorship and no competition are never a good thing, no matter how much you guys love Apple.

It's understandable that one malcontent would promote the verbal garbage of another. Your natural tendency is to ban together to better justify your existence, after all.

Your words do rather speak volumes, though. Why would a successful developer complain so? This must mean that you're either NOT successful (by your own perverse design) or that you're not a developer at all, and are merely taking advantage of the facility of these article threads to spew your nonsense.
 
Comment

twilson

macrumors 6502
Apr 11, 2005
376
13
They should review apps that don't sell a certain quantity in a certain time period. Not saying that they necessarily would be removed, but that should help filter out nonesense apps. Maybe move them to a different section called bargain apps. Sort of like the cheap CD section at a music store.

That is a definite no-no. I have two apps which don't sell tons, but trickle along at a few a day. There is no way in hell I'd want Apple to remove them. People are buying it, so it's all good for me, albheit slowly.
 
Comment
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.