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Apr 12, 2001
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Apple enterprise management company Jamf today announced that the Jamf platform powers 20 million devices worldwide and serves more than 47,000 customers, which is a new milestone.

jamf.jpg

Over the course of 2020 alone, Jamf has added more than 4 million devices and 10,000 customers, and it is now powering 24 of the 25 most valuable brands (based on Forbes' list of the most valuable technology companies).
"Coming into 2015, Jamf was 13 years old and managing less than 4 million devices for approximately 5,000 customers. That year, as the enterprise saw a growing number of professionals demanding to use Apple at work, we set an aggressive goal to empower the new workforce by running on 20 million Apple devices by the end of 2020," said Dean Hager, CEO of Jamf. "Through our mission to help organizations succeed with Apple, we are proud to have achieved this milestone, and more importantly to have enabled so many organizations to help their employees, doctors, nurses, teachers and students get the most out of their technology and be their best."
Jamf runs on all 10 of the largest U.S. banks, 10 of the top 10 global universities, 16 of the top 20 best U.S. hospitals, and 7 of the top 10 Fortune 500 technology companies.

For those unfamiliar with Jamf, it is enterprise management software that businesses, schools, hospitals, and government organizations use for Apple device management purposes.

Article Link: Apple Enterprise Company Jamf Now Manages 20 Million+ Devices Worldwide
 
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chinito77

macrumors regular
Nov 2, 2015
194
260
Japan
This is a good company with very good products. I remember a very long time ago, we invited JAMF over to showcase us an early iphone MDM. The vice president at the time came over which was a rare thing to see back then. Either way, I've worked at several big agencies and those which used JAMF products were always the ones with reliable hardware.
 
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nikhsub1

macrumors 68020
Jun 19, 2007
2,179
1,292
mmmm... jessica.'s beer...
At what point does Apple decide that JAMF has become too powerful, and therefore must be cut out of the equation?
It's not that - apple doesn't have the tools to manage iOS devices the way jamf does. They could, but they don't. I have several hundred devices that I manage with jamf since 2017. Apple is really doing no favors to help the enterprise market in this regard.
 
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ELman

macrumors regular
Jul 6, 2017
158
277
We use JAMF's basic service. For $2 a month per device they are hard to beat.
 
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ArtOfWarfare

macrumors G3
Nov 26, 2007
9,132
5,107
The only Mac is my life (one provided by my employer) is using JAMF.

I think I also have it on my iPhone... I think that was a requirement to get Teams and Outlook set up there.
 
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aesc80

macrumors 6502a
Mar 24, 2015
945
2,001
huh ... didn't even know Apple owned JAMF. No wondering it's a decent upgrading service. Love that it can be reskinned too (for, you know, a service my employer can push **** onto me)
 
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ouimetnick

macrumors 68040
Aug 28, 2008
3,083
4,270
Beverly, Massachusetts
huh ... didn't even know Apple owned JAMF. No wondering it's a decent upgrading service. Love that it can be reskinned too (for, you know, a service my employer can push **** onto me)
Apple doesn’t own them. The pretty much exist because Apple has abandoned the enterprise market to focus on consumer services.
 
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star-affinity

macrumors 65816
Nov 14, 2007
1,416
680
It's not that - apple doesn't have the tools to manage iOS devices the way jamf does. They could, but they don't. I have several hundred devices that I manage with jamf since 2017. Apple is really doing no favors to help the enterprise market in this regard.
You know Apple acquired Fleetsmith some six months ago?


If one goes to their Help Center one ends up on Apple's domain:

 
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Animaniac

macrumors member
Feb 16, 2004
37
3
Cambridge, MA
These types of tools are spyware and a privacy nightmare. As folks move to single BYOD for personal and work, enterprise endpoint protections should come in standalone apps for enterprise applications, not through complete OS-wide surveillance. The above comment about wanting location tracking is worrisome, and that mindset just normalizes workplace surveillance.
 
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TriBruin

macrumors regular
Jul 28, 2008
224
481
Apple doesn’t own them. The pretty much exist because Apple has abandoned the enterprise market to focus on consumer services.
Apple actually uses Jamf as their MDM solution internally. They have used it for several years now, but only publicly admitted it a little over a year ago.

Since that time they purchased Fleetsmith. I am still not sure what Apple's play is here. I have never looked too closely at Fleetsmith, but they always seem to be focused at small and medium sized business that did not want to pay the Jamf costs (which are higher than most MDMs.) It is not like Apple needed their buy their own MDM (they literally write the spec for the MDM protocol and do have a reference MDM solution in Profile Manager.) If Apple was really looking to become an MDM provider, they have the toolset.
 
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TriBruin

macrumors regular
Jul 28, 2008
224
481
These types of tools are spyware and a privacy nightmare. As folks move to single BYOD for personal and work, enterprise endpoint protections should come in standalone apps for enterprise applications, not through complete OS-wide surveillance. The above comment about wanting location tracking is worrisome, and that mindset just normalizes workplace surveillance.

They are nothing of the sort. They are there to protect the company from users that can't be trusted. The first time a user copies a highly classified email in to their own email and forwards it to a competitor, a company will wish they had an MDM solution in place to protect corporate assets and data.

Besides, Apple is working to ensure that users are protected as well. Apple actually prohibits companies from collecting location data at the MDM levels unless the device is marked as in Lost Mode. For BYOD devices, Apple has introduced a new enrollment method that transparently segregates personal data/apps from corporate data/apps.

(For the record, like any tools, MDM can be overused or even abused. There are still CIOs/IT Managers that want to over manage devices. That is a corporate problem, not a problem with MDM.)
 
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sentiblue

macrumors regular
Aug 2, 2012
218
155
Silicon Valley
I use Macbook Pro for work for a long time and I've seen Jamf app/commands all the time... I just never realized it was a company that belongs to Apple itself.

Nvm... I misread the article... it's an Apple management system not an Apple company...
 
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jz0309

macrumors 68020
Sep 25, 2018
2,274
6,346
Temecula, CA
never heard of them. I used Microsoft's device management previously with a company I worked for - is jamf the equivalent of that?
 
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rk-apple

macrumors member
May 4, 2015
55
174
We use Jamf to manage several hundred shared student iPads in a higher education setting. Without Jamf, it would be very difficult, if not impossible, to correctly and efficiently manage that number of iPads.
 
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jinnj

macrumors 6502
Dec 9, 2011
465
346
It's not that - apple doesn't have the tools to manage iOS devices the way jamf does. They could, but they don't. I have several hundred devices that I manage with jamf since 2017. Apple is really doing no favors to help the enterprise market in this regard.
Jobs stated multiple times that they have do not want to cater to the enterprise market. They stagnate innovation. Look at Windows... 16 bit Parallel drivers in their "pure" 32-bit API .NET. Look at what happens when you make big changes (MS Vista).
 
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jinnj

macrumors 6502
Dec 9, 2011
465
346
These types of tools are spyware and a privacy nightmare. As folks move to single BYOD for personal and work, enterprise endpoint protections should come in standalone apps for enterprise applications, not through complete OS-wide surveillance. The above comment about wanting location tracking is worrisome, and that mindset just normalizes workplace surveillance.
I don't allow it on any of my personal devices. My employer has to supply me with the equipment (and cell plan) if they want to get access to it.
 
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jinnj

macrumors 6502
Dec 9, 2011
465
346
I use Macbook Pro for work for a long time and I've seen Jamf app/commands all the time... I just never realized it was a company that belongs to Apple itself.

Nvm... I misread the article... it's an Apple management system not an Apple company...
Yeah that ****** title makes it seem like JAMF is an Apple Company.
 
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Analog Kid

macrumors 603
Mar 4, 2003
5,784
4,602
The first time a user copies a highly classified email in to their own email and forwards it to a competitor, a company will wish they had an MDM solution in place to protect corporate assets and data.
This is why I favor chipping all employees. The first time a user dictates a highly classified email to a competitor, a company will wish they’d had a subdural implant solution in place to protect corporate assets and data.

Apple actually prohibits companies from collecting location data at the MDM levels unless the device is marked as in Lost Mode. For BYOD devices, Apple has introduced a new enrollment method that transparently segregates personal data/apps from corporate data/apps.

Glad to hear this. I’ve been eyeing the dual SIM solution to separate personal from business rather than two separate devices, but I’m just not comfortable giving access to my personal information. I’ll have to check if the wall here is high enough.
 
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ururk

macrumors member
Jun 29, 2007
30
10
If Apple was really looking to become an MDM provider, they have the toolset.
I use JAMF for an (admittedly) small deployment of 120 iPad "kiosks". I originally tried to use Apple's MDM server management software - but it was buggy, had to be restarted repeatedly, and just plain didn't work. I could never understand how they managed to both write the spec for something and fail miserably in the software that utilized the spec, but they did. Heck, our Apple reps hinted that we should use JAMF.

JAMF is pretty good for what I need it to do, and as Apple has updated MDM on their devices - and Apple has fixed bugs - JAMF has released new versions to either take advantage of those features or add new ones.

JAMF's management interface is so/so - and there are a few annoyances with it's interface - but I don't have any real complaints. It's is annoying enough that I used their API to script software updates and other bulk tasks so I rarely login into ther interface.

Jobs stated multiple times that they have do not want to cater to the enterprise market. They stagnate innovation. Look at Windows... 16 bit Parallel drivers in their "pure" 32-bit API .NET. Look at what happens when you make big changes (MS Vista).
I'm not sure supporting enterprise by letting them manage a device fully would lead to stagnation. For people who use iPads, erm, unorthodoxly - like kiosks, room schedulers, etc.... - there are a few missing features that would make the solution "complete" for a lot of people but would also lead to questions about privacy (this is my personal wishlist, others may have different ideas):

  • remote desktop
  • true no-touch software update
  • all system settings exposed via plist or other means

I can't say much about mac or AppleTV management, though might bring our AppleTV's if we need to deploy a dedicated conference room app to them.
 
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