Apple got it's MacBook Pro pricing wrong

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Obi Wan Kenobi, Nov 4, 2016.

  1. Obi Wan Kenobi macrumors 6502

    Obi Wan Kenobi

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    #1
    I think Apple got it's MacBook Pro pricing wrong.

    Processor capacity does not double every couple of years now. The improvements in processors we used to see are no more. The technology has matured. Intel are making their chips more efficient, and less power hungry, not more powerful. The performance improvements for users are only incremental.

    It is true that the new MacBook Pros are smaller and lighter. It is true that smaller and lighter is important in a portable computer. But they were already pretty small and they were already pretty light.

    With these new machines, Apple are not selling twice the processing power in a smaller device. It's just slightly faster than last time, and slightly smaller. It's a slightly more modern computer. Therefore, in my opinion, the price points should have been kept exactly as they were.

    Phil Schiller says they are selling very well online. I believe him. After a delayed update there is pent up demand. And Apple's launch events are brilliant. Their marketing is brilliant. But once the excitement fades, and cooler consideration is given to them, I think a lot of people are going to realise their current machines are almost as fast, as the new ones, and negligibly bigger or heavier, and they are going to ask themselves do I really want to spend so much money to buy (pretty much) what I already have?
     
  2. Queen6, Nov 4, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2016

    Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    #2
    I belive the same there is a pent up demand form the hardcore fans, and only one place to purchase; Apple`s online store. In the longterm I only see the MBP selling in lower numbers that the outgoing models; too expensive for the average consumer, too diluted for many professional users. All the "Pro" users I know who are in the market are far from impressed, with some being now more interested in Microsoft`s upcoming Surface Studio.

    All Apple has produced this time around is a nice consumer notebook, albeit very expensive with the "Pro"emphasis solidly being one of Profit...

    Q-6
     
  3. Samuelsan2001 macrumors 604

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    #3
    What the Microsoft studio computers that uses "outdated processors" (if it's true for Apple it is for Microsoft I know it's nonsense but it's everywhere!!) and last generation GPU's they also have Poor storage options and are just as expensive and are 3 months behind Apple but of course Apple has been neglecting their computer line??
     
  4. Obi Wan Kenobi thread starter macrumors 6502

    Obi Wan Kenobi

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    #4
    MacBook Pro (short for Profit). Lol. I like it.
     
  5. wbrat macrumors regular

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    Sep 18, 2014
    #5
    I was waiting for some time for the event and new MBPs as I decided to buy one (so far I had used my parents' 2007 MBP model). And after the event I bought one, but because of pricing I went for standard i5 2.7Ghz 2015 model with 256GB SSD. Especially that I found quite nice deal on that (about 1460 USD with 23% VAT tax included)
     
  6. onVacation macrumors member

    onVacation

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    #6
    The Surface Studio is a completely new release, so no "neglecting" there.

    Surface Books on the other hand have been available with Skylake CPUs right from the start, so "3 months behind Apple" isn't really on spot either.

    Yes, they are expensive, but in the end they have a touchscreen with a digitizer and can double as a tablet. That way you basically have a Macbook and an iPad Pro w/ Apple Pencil in one device (or iMac and iPad Pro, if you go for the Studio).

    Just like the rMB they're a first gen product, they have their flaws and if Microsoft gets rid of these problems with the Surface Book 2, I might get one. Although it's not for, I'm still somewhat excited to see how the Surface Studio performs and what problems is might have/not have.
     
  7. Samuelsan2001 macrumors 604

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    Oct 24, 2013
    #7
    I'm just pointing out that they have the same "issues " (no issues at all) that everyone is levelling at apples computers the iMac has had skylake since last October so what there is nothing to replace it yet!!
     
  8. Naaaaak macrumors 6502

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    Mar 26, 2010
    #8
    Their mobile lineup is a cluster****. I don't understand the differentiation between the lines.

    MacBook: Ultra-light, low-power, compact laptop.
    MacBook Air: Light, low-power, compact laptop. Except tapered, has the only non-Retina display in the whole lineup, but is faster and with more ports??
    MacBook Pro: Light, high-power, compact laptop. Adds 2" of screen on some models and a required TouchBar on some models. And new ports. But only half speed on one side of one model, and only half as many on the base model???

    So:
    The MacBook has a turd oddball-resolution display that's too small.
    The MacBook Air has a turd display that's too old.
    The MacBook Pro has a turd TouchBar you can't get rid of if you want a bigger display and turd pricing.

    One of these lines should have been killed, 13" non-oddball resolution Retina should be the "lowest" display you can get, and the TouchBar should be an optional keyboard upgrade not a required add-on that's yet to prove its value.
     
  9. jjlannoo Suspended

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    Oct 8, 2011
    #9
    Yeah I'm sure you know better lmao.
     
  10. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    #10
    Similar to the 2016 15" MBP I will see how the Studio develops with interest, however the Studio is certainly spiking interest with those that I know who can monetise this level of hardware. I think the key benefit is the hardware gets out the way with the Studio, allowing designers & digital artists to focus on their work. The Studio is a great concept how it pans out remains to be seen. Personally I can the Studio 2 being a very compelling device as Microsoft of 2016 does listen and act on its customers feedback these days.

    My own needs are very different, equally a new i7 Surface Book is now on my desk in process of being set up, replacing my 2014 13" rMBP. As much as I like Apple`s hardware it must meet my requirements, as these systems are for business purpose, needing to bring value in ever challenging & dynamic environments. This is the first MBP release I have decided to pass and look at the competition;

    The "base" non Touch Bar 13" MBP once specified as close as possible to my i7 Surface Book is $2033 with local taxes not including any of the mandatory dongles. I paid less than $2100 for my i7 Surface Book in store. One company is offering a product that will enhance my work flow potentially, bringing even more to the table. The other not so much; thin for the sake of thinner. Given the flexibility of the Surface Book, performance and pricing the new 13" MBP simply fails to impress...

    Apple has completely neglected the Mac, this is very clear you know it, I know it and is obvious to all, throwing Microsoft`s deficiencies on the table wont change the facts. With the 2016 launch being considered as lacklustre by many. I don't think the 2016 MBP`s are duds, however they are rather underwhelming, barring the initial surge IMHO I doubt they will do little to revert the current dropping trend in Mac sales. If you want to support Apple, it`s a free world equally you can only expect more of the same unless a strong message is sent by the user base.

    Q-6
     
  11. Samuelsan2001 macrumors 604

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    Oct 24, 2013
    #11
    We'all just have to agree to disagree I'm afraid nothing you have said contradicts anything I've said we just see things differentl.

    Apple innovate, oh actually don't do that I hate it. Apple use cutting edge tech, actually don't I don't want to pay for it. I have seen endless contradictory nonsense from you and everyone else for months it's funny pointless and in 6months time it'll all be forgotten when the MacBook Pro is the all round laptop to beat again.
     
  12. Impatientmac macrumors regular

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    Oct 13, 2016
    #12
    The prices were kept the same if you look at the base model compared to the 2015 model with 256GB
     
  13. Howard2k macrumors 6502a

    Howard2k

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    #13

    You don't really think that Microsoft are a charity do you?
     
  14. stockscalper, Nov 4, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2016

    stockscalper macrumors 6502a

    stockscalper

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    #14
    When I look at the base model I see a $1,200 machine, not a $1,500 one. Maybe the price hike wouldn't have been so obvious if Apple had not removed the extension cord and micro cloth from the kit and dropped in a multi port dongle. Or maybe included a nice leather sleeve like the same specced HP Spectre x360 does for $1,050. If they had added a few things instead of taking away things that used to be included maybe the price increase wouldn't sting so much. But it is what it is and for whatever reason Apple thought they could jack the price up on the new models.

    As for the processor, Intel has said for laptops they've been concentrating on making the chips more energy efficient, managing memory better and running cooler. All of these aspects are welcome in notebooks as the processors are plenty fast enough.
     
  15. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    #15
    Not for one second, little more transparent and the hardwares coming on strong, if it work s for you. 10 years ago had anyone suggested that I would buy a notebook produced my Microsoft I would have just laughed, these days one is sitting next to one of my Retina`s on the desk. So I am acutely aware that MS has it`s costs :)

    Q-6
    --- Post Merged, Nov 4, 2016 ---
    They are just computers, people pick what works best for them end of story. Apple is not doing anything magical here and strong competition is only good for the consumer. If you want one buy one, they don't met my current needs, nor do I believe the 1st Gen 15" is a safe bet, having been down that path already. Enjoy your slice of Apple tax :)

    Q-6
     
  16. tubeexperience macrumors 68040

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    Feb 17, 2016
    #16
    There is currently a pent up demand for the new MacBook Pro, but once that is exhausted, the new MacBook Pro will be a tough sell.

    Apple has already alienated the professionals by removing the ports and SDXC slot.

    That means that Apple would have to sell even more of the new MBP to consumers and consumers are much more sensitive to prices than do professionals.
    --- Post Merged, Nov 4, 2016 ---
    Err? What are some innovations Apple made to the Mac lately?

    The new MacBook Pro doesn't warrant the price hikes since technology gets cheaper over time.

    For example, I doubt that Intel hike up the price of Skylake so that it's more expensive than Haswell, assuming equivalent timeline.
     
  17. Obi Wan Kenobi thread starter macrumors 6502

    Obi Wan Kenobi

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    #17
    I know what you mean, but that ignores the fact that memory gets cheaper over time, and less expensive to manufacture. 256GB is the least storage for the new base line model. My point is that the new baseline model should have had the same price as the old one, because the machine's aren't that different.

    I think Apple have looked at their previous price marks for new MacBook Pros and followed them. The difference in 2016 is that there is no leap in processor technology to justify the price hike.
     
  18. crassapple Suspended

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    Oct 31, 2016
    #18
    Apple's rev A laptops have traditionally been priced high, then come down in the next year or so. Compared to the first generation unibody macbook and first gen retina macbook pro, the new MBP non-touch is priced similarly.

    Fewer people are buying PCs now so there is less volume sales to make up for lower prices.
     
  19. chrisrosemusic1 macrumors 6502a

    chrisrosemusic1

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    #19
    You have a similar opinion to many of my friends who are currently on the fence about buying a new Mac or a Surface Book. The problem I have with Windows machines, despite Win10 being a very lovely OS indeed is the lack of continuity with my other Apple devices including moving all my purchases between my family share and my own downloads. And also, Windows hardware is looking rather lovely now too, but their reliability stays wishy washy. Their reviews page for the Surface have some interesting, al-beit not necessarily worrying, but statements that would concern me with putting £1800 into their machine over Apples.

    Time will tell whether you or my friends make the right move ;D
     
  20. Obi Wan Kenobi thread starter macrumors 6502

    Obi Wan Kenobi

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    #20
    I agree, but this time the new spec doesn't justify the price. It's an incremental increase in speed and power, and a reduced size machine. It's good. I saw the base model MacBook Pro in an Apple store today. But it doesn't justify the price.

    Previous A rev laptops have.
     
  21. fs454 macrumors 68000

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    Los Angeles / Boston
    #21
    The issue with the Surface products is that they don't make a single quad-core model. I'd have purchased a quad-core+dGPU+32GB RAM Surface Book in seconds coming off this rMBP disaster, but Intel is to blame all across the industry.

    It sucks that the entire computing industry outside of ARM is hanging at the whim of a company who has all but halted advancement. Better yet, they've announced a bunch of "tocks" but are rolling them out slowly enough that ordinary consumers are starting to doubt OEMs for including what they think is "last gen". So not only are they introducing extremely marginal updates, they're taking literal years to roll them out.

    And no LPDDR4 support in the next two generations? Excuse me? I've got LPDDR3 in my three-year-old MBP, what has been the holdup for moving that forward?

    Truth be told, Intel could have done nothing for four years and nobody would have seen a tangible difference in mobile CPUs.
     
  22. crassapple Suspended

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    Oct 31, 2016
    #22
    Depends on who they are trying to justify the price too... Like you said, the processor performance doesn't double every couple years anymore. People are keeping their PCs much longer. For most people that bought one of Apple's computers in the last 5 years, it's going to still perform good enough to not justify an upgrade. For people on the old school unibodies (2012 and earlier), there's a huge weight savings combined with greater performance. For someone that wants to save a lot of weight it can be worth it. For me, I'm using a 2008 macbook and I can easily justify the price of the new MBP non-TB.

    For consumers that like to upgrade every couple years because they like the new shiny thing, it's unlikely to be worth it.
     
  23. Impatientmac macrumors regular

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    Oct 13, 2016
    #23
    But to your point it ignores that the old retina MacBook Pro has already gone through price cut(s) since it's release in 2012
     
  24. Obi Wan Kenobi thread starter macrumors 6502

    Obi Wan Kenobi

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    #24
    That, my friend, is exactly my point. It's not Apple's fault that the machine's haven't leapt forward in power and utility and so justify Apple's (usual Rev A) pricing. But with that limitation, the price hike is just too much.

    I think the slow down in processor improvements requires a re-think in the pricing model of new laptops. Their shelf life is going to elongate. A 7% improvement in processing justifies maintaining the old entry price, not a £350 price hike from £1,099 to £1449.

    The new shape is clever. It's impressive, but it doesn't justify a price hike. They were already light, and thin.
     
  25. norbinhouston macrumors regular

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    Houston
    #25
    What people forget is that Apple is a hardware company. Did you guys forget that we get almost all of the software for free? Mac OS, iTunes, Mail, Safari, an office suite, etc etc. Remember the days we had to pay for OS upgrades every year? Or pay for email and cloud services (I do and have a .mac email address still!)? Or iLife? You have to pay for that one way or another. I think Apple is just building those fees into new hardware pricing.
     

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