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Apple's agreement with U.S. states looking to add digital ID cards such as driver's licenses to the Wallet app includes strict terms and charges footed to the taxpayer, according to fintech consultant Jason Mikula and CNBC.

apple-wallet-drivers-license-feature.jpg

The ability to add a driver's license or ID to the Wallet app is a new feature in iOS 15. Customers will be able to tap the plus icon at the top of the Wallet app to add their ID, and then simply tap their iPhone or Apple Watch on an identity reader at a TSA checkpoint, without taking out their physical card.

Confidential documents seen by Mikula and CNBC purportedly reveal that Apple is imposing stringent terms and conditions on U.S. states looking to implement the new feature. The costs of meeting these requirements, such as hiring staff, project management, marketing, and funding, will be charged to the taxpayer with no financial support from Apple.

The company requires states to independently maintain the systems used to issue and service credentials, hire project managers to respond to Apple's inquiries, verify IDs, perform quality testing to ensure that digital IDs meet Apple's requirements, "prominently" market the feature, "proactively" offer digital IDs whenever a citizen gets a new or replacement card, and encourage state and federal government agencies to widely adopt digital IDs.

Apple has "sole discretion" for a number of the program's key aspects, including what devices will be compatible with digital IDs, how states report on the performance of the feature, and its launch date. Apple is also insisting upon the ability to review and approve all state marketing for the feature.

These terms were apparently included in a seven-page memorandum of agreement that was signed by Georgia, Arizona, Kentucky, and Oklahoma. According to CNBC, the agreement "mostly portrays Apple as having a high degree of control over the government agencies responsible for issuing identification cards."

Georgia and Arizona are set to be the first states to offer citizens the opportunity to add their driver's license to the Wallet app, but have yet to launch the program. CNBC noted that while it reviewed the contracts for these states, it has not seen the exact agreements for Connecticut, Iowa, Maryland, and Utah, the four other states that have signed up for Apple's digital ID program.

Article Link: Apple Imposing Strict Terms on U.S. States for Digital IDs in Wallet App
 
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fwmireault

macrumors 68000
Jul 4, 2019
1,505
6,551
Montreal, Canada
It’s way more in apple’s benefit than the states to expand IDs to the Wallet app. I’m surprised Apple doesn’t offer a bigger logistical and financial support in the deployment of this feature as I think the adoption rate will be very low.

I would love this to be coming to Canada, but not holding my breath
 

msackey

macrumors 6502a
Oct 8, 2020
910
812
Ok, I don't know the full details of this program, but from just reading the article this is not good. This is like turning upside down where a private company is imposing restrictions. It should be the government (representing the general public) that imposes standards.

I think what this means is that the US federal and state governments need to come up with a digital wallet standard.
 

Freida

macrumors 68040
Oct 22, 2010
3,765
5,363
We still don't have Apple Card so this is years away. And here in QC I probably won't come till 2042 as QC is about 20 years behind with everything.

It’s way more in apple’s benefit than the states to expand IDs to the Wallet app. I’m surprised Apple doesn’t offer a bigger logistical and financial support in the deployment of this feature as I think the adoption rate will be very low.

I would love this to be coming to Canada, but not holding my breath
 

mikesilv

macrumors member
Dec 27, 2006
41
109
Seattle
Which is why they can, and likely will, only sign up a handful of mostly red laissez faire ‘government is the enemy’ fetishist states.

Others aren’t going to play ball with constituents’ data and their power of licensure on Apple’s terms.

I want this feature. But I’d be mad if my state knuckled under to these silly terms.
 

jicon

macrumors 6502a
Nov 29, 2004
685
495
Toronto, ON
It’s way more in apple’s benefit than the states to expand IDs to the Wallet app. I’m surprised Apple doesn’t offer a bigger logistical and financial support in the deployment of this feature as I think the adoption rate will be very low.

I would love this to be coming to Canada, but not holding my breath
I had read Ontario has a plan to offer an opt in to digitize ids, allegedly late 2021. https://www.ontario.ca/page/digital-id-ontario Will that one day offer drivers licenses as an option? Likely one day.
 

JimmyHook

macrumors 6502a
Apr 7, 2015
802
1,565
Digital IDs will be cross-platform eventually. No sense in Apple investing too much in it. Besides, I’d rather have the state decide how IDs are verified than a private company. It seems that Apple is saying they’ll make the wallet, and the states must do the rest. Makes sense since states control ID issuance and acceptance anyway
 

LeadingHeat

macrumors 6502a
Oct 3, 2015
996
2,460
A little conflicted really. On one hand, I love that the data is being securely handled and scrutinized this intensely, because it’s literally my identity. On the other hand, I don’t love that Apple’s making it this hard to get one for the state because I’d really love to actually use one in my state.

That being said, this is definitely a he said she said argument because we haven’t heard Apple officially come out and say anything.

I also wonder if Apple is having to put forth these measures to ensure the data IS secure and private, because our government wouldn’t care about having such strict high standards on privacy…
 

JonaM

macrumors member
Sep 26, 2017
95
107
I'm confused as to why Apple would be expected to foot the bill for any entity ( state or otherwise) to utilise functionality in an Apple product. The fact Apple have strict guidelines sounds eminently sensible otherwise no-one would accept or trust the digital IDs.
And the oversight on marketing sounds like a sensible idea to avoid anyone advertising in a way that would damage the digital ID concept for all states.
 

ghostface147

macrumors 68040
May 28, 2008
3,917
4,556
It has benefits I guess, but it'd be a inconvenience if I have to give my phone through the Walgreens pharmacy drive thru to get some of the medications my family takes. I'd keep both a physical and digital copy.
 
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Stevenyo

macrumors member
Oct 2, 2020
72
161


Apple's agreement with U.S. states looking to add digital ID cards such as driver's licenses to the Wallet app includes strict terms and charges footed to the taxpayer, according to fintech consultant Jason Mikula and CNBC.

apple-wallet-drivers-license-feature.jpg

The ability to add a driver's license or ID to the Wallet app is a new feature in iOS 15. Customers will be able to tap the plus icon at the top of the Wallet app to add their ID, and then simply tap their iPhone or Apple Watch on an identity reader at a TSA checkpoint, without taking out their physical card.

Confidential documents seen by Mikula and CNBC purportedly reveal that Apple is imposing stringent terms and conditions on U.S. states looking to implement the new feature. The costs of meeting these requirements, such as hiring staff, project management, marketing, and funding, will be charged to the taxpayer with no financial support from Apple.

The company requires states to independently maintain the systems used to issue and service credentials, hire project managers to respond to Apple's inquiries, verify IDs, perform quality testing to ensure that digital IDs meet Apple's requirements, "prominently" market the feature, "proactively" offer digital IDs whenever a citizen gets a new or replacement card, and encourage state and federal government agencies to widely adopt digital IDs.

Apple has "sole discretion" for a number of the program's key aspects, including what devices will be compatible with digital IDs, how states report on the performance of the feature, and its launch date. Apple is also insisting upon the ability to review and approve all state marketing for the feature.

These terms were apparently included in a seven-page memorandum of agreement that was signed by Georgia, Arizona, Kentucky, and Oklahoma. According to CNBC, the agreement "mostly portrays Apple as having a high degree of control over the government agencies responsible for issuing identification cards."

Georgia and Arizona are set to be the first states to offer citizens the opportunity to add their driver's license to the Wallet app, but have yet to launch the program. CNBC noted that while it reviewed the contracts for these states, it has not seen the exact agreements for Connecticut, Iowa, Maryland, and Utah, the four other states that have signed up for Apple's digital ID program.

Article Link: Apple Imposing Strict Terms on U.S. States for Digital IDs in Wallet App
I’d so add my ID to my phone if this comes to my state, might finally be able to ditch the wallet! Ugh, am I part of the problem?

Anyway, does anyone see any other developed nation agreeing to take on Apple’s costs to add this feature that benefits apple? Serious question
 
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citysnaps

macrumors G3
Oct 10, 2011
9,863
20,412
I'm confused as to why Apple would be expected to foot the bill for any entity ( state or otherwise) to utilise functionality in an Apple product. The fact Apple have strict guidelines sounds eminently sensible otherwise no-one would accept or trust the digital IDs.
And the oversight on marketing sounds like a sensible idea to avoid anyone advertising in a way that would damage the digital ID concept for all states.

Spot on. But that kind of thoughtful reasoning will not get people frothed up and outraged with Apple.
 
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