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Apple this month announced a new Launch@Apple mentorship program that's designed for first-generation college students, with the program set to launch in early 2021.

apple-launch-student-program.jpg

According to a PDF describing Launch@Apple, it is aimed at first-generation college freshmen and sophomores who are majoring in finance, mathematics, economics, business, data analytics, and accounting.

It matches college students one-on-one with Apple mentors who are able to provide resources for learning and opportunities for professional growth, with the possibility of job shadowing, paid externships, and paid internships.

Apple has not publicly announced Launch@Apple, and it's not entirely clear how the word is being spread. MyHealthyApple shared details this morning, and last week, a LinkedIn post highlighted the program. Ahead of when Launch begins in early 2021, Apple is accepting applications from students with a wide range of GPAs.

Students must be in their first or second year of college with a parent or legal guardian who has not obtained a college degree. Students must want to learn about finance in a "fast-paced, innovative environment" and must be intending to major in one of the accepted disciplines.

Apple is accepting applications through Friday, January 8, 2021, and students who want to participate must provide details on school, GPA, resume, and more, and are required to answer personal questions on life challenges, why they should be accepted, and what gives them joy. Applications must be sent to launch@apple.com.

Article Link: Apple Launches First-Generation College Student Mentorship Program
 

rtomyj

macrumors 6502a
Sep 3, 2012
810
748
Good on Apple for doing this. First generation college students often lack the resources and guidance to succeed. Hopefully this will help.
This is offensive to me as a first-gen in the country and college graduate. Every student has the same level of access to counseling and 1-1 with advisors. We aren’t stupid.

Wish I had this when I went to school but I’m doing alright without it or any gender/race based grants/scholarships. Really hope Apple doesn’t have a quota for this...
 
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applicious84

macrumors 6502
Sep 1, 2020
291
617
What if students realize how awful those majors are in the middle of schooling? Can they still get help from Apple if they instead choose to major in something helpful for the world?
 
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citysnaps

macrumors 604
Oct 10, 2011
7,937
13,844
San Francisco
This is offensive to me as a first-gen in the country and college graduate. Every student has the same level of access to counseling and 1-1 with advisors. We aren’t stupid.

Wish I had this when I went to school but I’m doing alright without it or any gender/race based grants/scholarships. Really hope Apple doesn’t have a quota for this...

How nice for you!

You may not be aware that every family's immigration story is different. And what worked for you and your circumstances may not work for others and their circumstances.

Rather than be seriously offended, try and find happiness that Apple in stepping up to help.
 
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dannyyankou

macrumors G4
Mar 2, 2012
10,677
21,216
Westchester, NY
This is offensive to me as a first-gen in the country and college graduate. Every student has the same level of access to counseling and 1-1 with advisors. We aren’t stupid.

Wish I had this when I went to school but I’m doing alright without it or any gender/race based grants/scholarships. Really hope Apple doesn’t have a quota for this...
And good on you for working hard and doing well. But my point was more that other families are privileged to have structures in place to give their kids tons of extra resources, private tutoring, etc to give their kids a head start. First generation college students usually come from poorer families and they don’t have the extra resources.
 
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peytn

macrumors newbie
Aug 10, 2016
3
13
This is offensive to me as a first-gen in the country and college graduate. Every student has the same level of access to counseling and 1-1 with advisors. We aren’t stupid.

Wish I had this when I went to school but I’m doing alright without it or any gender/race based grants/scholarships. Really hope Apple doesn’t have a quota for this...
1st gen as well here. The tough part seems to have been knowing how to put together a traditional career when your parents hadn’t. Having a mentor at a big company would probably help. Also let’s stop being offended when we disagree. Talking things over is okay.
 
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dannyyankou

macrumors G4
Mar 2, 2012
10,677
21,216
Westchester, NY
1st gen as well here. The tough part seems to have been knowing how to put together a traditional career when your parents hadn’t. Having a mentor at a big company would probably help. Also let’s stop being offended when we disagree. Talking things over is okay.
Damned if you do, damned if you don’t. Apple’s just trying to help underprivileged young adults find jobs, especially during these challenging economic times.
 
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williamyx

macrumors member
Jul 6, 2020
39
57
This'll probably be exclusive to only areas that have an existing Apple corporate presence, generally the vibe I've gotten from other corporate mentorship programs
 
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Xenden

macrumors regular
Jun 14, 2013
230
275
Rio Rancho, NM
Too bad this isn’t for everyone. My parents stopped paying attention to school after elementary school. (By that, I mean they set me up well enough that I was self-sufficient enough to know when to ask for help)

Once college started, I truly was on my own. My mom, (who is smart but feels like without a college degree she isn’t ”smart enough”) wasn’t up to helping me, and my dad (with a college degree), didn’t have contacts like some at Apple might have.

I get tired of hearing about underprivileged an at-risk young people.
 
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macduke

macrumors G4
Jun 27, 2007
11,673
16,150
Central U.S.
This would have been nice. As a first generation college student myself, I had no idea what I was doing and screwed up so many things along the way. Ultimately made it out ok but it took me extra time.

I had no idea what to do. Ended up taking the wrong classes in high school that didn't help me with getting into places. Didn't know a darn thing about scholarships and ended up with more debt. Didn't study for ACT and forgot my calculator. Spent most of my time during high school working so I could save up for my first year of college since I couldn't get anyone to co-sign loans and to buy my junker car. Had abusive parents who sabotaged me along the way. Made bad choices about the first degree I was going for because I didn't know you should research career paths and that kind of data wasn't readily available online yet. Went through years of only taking a few community college credits while trying to work to pay for everything. Had a terrible job that kept scheduling me during classes and I missed a lot, which made my grades suffer.

By the time I went away to a real university to try that, the economy was falling apart. Couldn't find any jobs for a while except for some work watching the front desk in my dorm all night because all the entry level jobs were being taken by middle-aged and older people who were being laid off. So I worked all night and then had to go straight into classes all day. Barely got any sleep while everyone else was partying, but I somehow made it onto the Dean's List. It was a big improvement over community college. Ended up switching majors partway through and had to take a lot of extra classes. Added some minors for no good reason except some so-called "counselors" talked me into it. So many bad choices and not all of them were my fault. Ended up getting married towards the end and my wife helped pay for things like food and rent so I could finish out school. Getting married also opened up a lot more grants and such since I wasn't on my parent's income for their EFC (my dad made ok money but it was a one income household and they blew every dime they got and I had to pay for everything).

Looking at my life today it's hard to believe how far I've come. I didn't grow up poor but I still had to bust my ass. In the end I think it mainly comes down to two things: work hard and be nice. But I also realize that it's going to be so much easier for my kids. First of all, we're going to pay for half their education. Still think it's important to have some skin in the game. But I'll be able to guide them every step so they know exactly what they should do. My wife has even more guidance and knowledge about things. She's also a first-generation college student but she had an aunt who was extremely educated and well off who helped guide her and helped pay for some things. So our kids will be very privileged compared to myself. I feel for all the kids out there who are so lost about college. Perhaps once the pandemic is over I should do some volunteering related to this as it really strikes a chord with me and I hadn't really thought of it until now.
 
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ThunderSkunk

macrumors 68040
Dec 31, 2007
3,159
2,886
Milwaukee Area
This is offensive to me as a first-gen in the country and college graduate. Every student has the same level of access to counseling and 1-1 with advisors. We aren’t stupid.

Wish I had this when I went to school but I’m doing alright without it or any gender/race based grants/scholarships. Really hope Apple doesn’t have a quota for this...
The traditionally dismal numbers on 1st Gen students succeeding are why 1st Gen programs exist. Glad everything came up roses for you and you have the luxury of getting all offended over... someone else providing assistance to yet someone else, which has nothing to do with you. ...assistance which you wish were there for you, but didn’t need, and now think no one else should have. Makes sense.

I think I’ll get offended because my neighbors parents helped their kid get a car for Christmas. I wish my parents bought me a car when I was 16. But I didnt need one anyway, and got my own eventually, so in conclusion, we should ban parents giving their kids presents.
 
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sideshowuniqueuser

macrumors 65816
Mar 20, 2016
1,125
889
1st gen as well here. The tough part seems to have been knowing how to put together a traditional career when your parents hadn’t. Having a mentor at a big company would probably help. Also let’s stop being offended when we disagree. Talking things over is okay.
Yes, as a 2nd gen grad, I can certainly attest to the advantages of not being 1st gen. There were many times when I was in a panic with looming exams and thought I was going to fail and wanted to drop out, but my parents talked me through it and said it's normal to think that, and just to stick with studying as best you can in the time that's left and you will think you're going to fail the exam but you always do better than you think. And they were right, and I always passed. And same for preparing for professional jobs, and dealing with work issues in professional work places and so on. Good luck to you, and lucky for your children that you've paved the way.
 
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rtomyj

macrumors 6502a
Sep 3, 2012
810
748
How nice for you!

You may not be aware that every family's immigration story is different. And what worked for you and your circumstances may not work for others and their circumstances.

Rather than be seriously offended, try and find happiness that Apple in stepping up to help.
You might also be aware that if many people figure out how to succeed it means others can too. I don’t like bigotry of low expectations
 
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rtomyj

macrumors 6502a
Sep 3, 2012
810
748
1st gen as well here. The tough part seems to have been knowing how to put together a traditional career when your parents hadn’t. Having a mentor at a big company would probably help. Also let’s stop being offended when we disagree. Talking things over is okay.
I don’t like people looking down on others because of “privilege” or other buzz words that just mean they think they are superior in one way or another. You know, bigotry of low expectations.
 
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rtomyj

macrumors 6502a
Sep 3, 2012
810
748
Yes, as a 2nd gen grad, I can certainly attest to the advantages of not being 1st gen. There were many times when I was in a panic with looming exams and thought I was going to fail and wanted to drop out, but my parents talked me through it and said it's normal to think that, and just to stick with studying as best you can in the time that's left and you will think you're going to fail the exam but you always do better than you think. And they were right, and I always passed. And same for preparing for professional jobs, and dealing with work issues in professional work places and so on. Good luck to you, and lucky for your children that you've paved the way.
Why do you need parents? Honestly my parents sucked. Divorced and poor. Very low chance of succeeding but I understood their limitations. You know what I did? Found friends that could be my “mentor”, asked questions and made plans. Basically I was as an adult.

The mentor ship is nice. I just feel like it’ll be targeted to “underprivileged” (ie minorities) people and not the once hungry/eager/etc. I like that GPA doesn’t necessarily qualify you, but being someone who almost failed HS, had no studying habits first couple years in a community college and then taking myself seriously at a university - GPA does definitely determine hunger/eagerness/etc.
 
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Pilot Jones

macrumors 6502
Oct 2, 2020
331
499
Why do you need parents? Honestly my parents sucked. Divorced and poor. Very low chance of succeeding but I understood their limitations. You know what I did? Found friends that could be my “mentor”, asked questions and made plans. Basically I was as an adult.

The mentor ship is nice. I just feel like it’ll be targeted to “underprivileged” (ie minorities) people and not the once hungry/eager/etc. I like that GPA doesn’t necessarily qualify you, but being someone who almost failed HS, had no studying habits first couple years in a community college and then taking myself seriously at a university - GPA does definitely determine hunger/eagerness/etc.

good on you mate. truly, i'm genuinely glad you made it out of a bad situation.

but everyone is not you. a lot of people don't have anyone (yes, even friends, counsellors & supportive teachers) or the resilience, guidance & fortitude to power through it. They NEED that major boost at a critical time in their lives to take them from nothing to something.

it's really quite myopic of you to argue for a universal application of your logic with such a specifically personal anecdote.

Some people have the talent but not the drive. They do not always occur together and a lot of the time, even if they had it, life has just beaten it out of them. Yes this also isn't universally true, but why be so negative at even the smallest chance to make people's lives better?
 
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Maconplasma

macrumors 68020
Sep 15, 2020
2,478
2,201
What if students realize how awful those majors are in the middle of schooling? Can they still get help from Apple if they instead choose to major in something helpful for the world?
Unless this is rhetorical you can call Apple and find out. 😉
 
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california_kid

macrumors 6502
Sep 9, 2016
288
366
San Francisco
How many of you think the first round of 1st gen students will include those from Harvard, Yale, Columbia, Stanford, etc? If so, does this diminish the program's purpose?
 
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