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Sasparilla

macrumors 68000
Jul 6, 2012
1,967
3,386
Anybody know why Apple stopped making the Windows version of Safari? What could motivate Apple to bring Safari back to Windows?

It was the 32 bit version of Safari which Apple had abandoned on the Mac platform many years before and it always had performance issues (I used it long after they stopped supporting it) - so it had little to no marketshare.

So they would have to start new with a 64 bit version (alot of work) and I'm guessing they just didn't want to - although if they brought out a version with serious performance in Windows they might do okay marketshare wise. JMHO...
 

atikalz

macrumors regular
Mar 22, 2016
233
306
Maybe they think about implementing such future features like favicons in the tabs... Safari sucks on usability so much.
 

asiga

macrumors 65816
Nov 4, 2012
1,048
1,364
Safari has been becoming exponentially fatter this last decade. Now they realized that Safari, while getting more and more explorer-ish and firefoxy on each new release, was not trashed enough if compared with OS Xiosh, so they had the idea of making it purple and let imagination flow to make it even fatter so that the update takes a couple hours to install.

Years ago, there was something called Mac.
 

PizzaBoxStyle

macrumors 6502
Dec 11, 2014
321
412
Apple HQ Cupterino Spaceship
Anybody know why Apple stopped making the Windows version of Safari? What could motivate Apple to bring Safari back to Windows?

it was horrible and no one used it. Combine that with total dominance by the other players (IE mainly at that point but secondarily Mozilla) and it just didn't make sense to compete there anymore.

When Safari for Windows launched, browsers on Windows were a mess. The choices were Internet Explorer and Firefox, neither of which were compliant with web standards to the extent WebKit was. Safari offered Windows users a browser that was more compliant with web standards.

Today, there are many more browsers for windows, and several of them use WebKit. There is really no point anymore. Plus, with the iCloud for Windows, you can sync your bookmarks and passwords regardless of which browser you use.

I think I remember reading somewhere that it had to do mostly with marketing. Apple/Steve Jobs didn't want to dump the resources needed into competing with Chrome's marketing.

Other people picked up the ball, and made browsers for Windows (and Linux) that are based on or derived from (Apple created, but now open source) WebKit. No need for Apple to duplicate that effort, especially for someone else's OS platform.

Not to mention Safari for Windows was outdated within a month of release. It was kind of garbage.

At the time of launch in 2007 there were no fast, standard compliant, dominate browsers on Windows. In 2008 Chrome launched that used WebKit at the time and quickly became dominate. They discontinued Safari in 2010 I think because Chrome out stripped it and it needed a lot of work, Chrome had far surpassed Safari in speed, features and stability and it wasn't core to what Apple did.

With Chrome of WebKit there might be some reason to get back into it but doubt it. It was great to begin with given the original offering but by 2010 compared to the others it was pretty crap.



Well, I found it. I found the story about why Safari on Windows was abandoned:

At a design review of a new Safari feature, the subject of the Windows version came up. Steve wanted to know what we could do to make it better and more competitive.

By this time I felt pretty relaxed being around Steve. So relaxed that I decided — what the hell — I’ll just be blunt.

Besides getting more folks at Apple to support development of Windows components the application depended on, I told him this wasn’t an engineering problem — I really needed advertising. And that Safari for Windows couldn’t compete with Chrome when Google put a download button for it on their home page and spent big on television, print and Web views.

Scott Forstall, also in the room, backed me up on this. Another reason Scott made a great boss.

Darin Adler, now running Safari and WebKit for me, had the presence of mind to add that the need for promotion wasn’t just a Windows Safari problem — Mac Safari would benefit from it too.

We were all huddled in the little design review room, some of us in chairs. I sat directly across and just a few feet from Steve.

He seemed to be thinking about the problem and the proposal for some time. He was actually considering this. And that was heartening. After all, Steve was famous for changing his mind.

But, in the end, he said no.


That excerpt came from Don Melton on his website. Very interesting post, highly recommend checking it out.

https://donmelton.com/2014/04/10/memories-of-steve/
 
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BeefCake 15

macrumors 68020
May 15, 2015
2,040
3,121
Anybody know why Apple stopped making the Windows version of Safari? What could motivate Apple to bring Safari back to Windows?

I'm not sure how you concluded that Apple is bringing Safari back to Windows? Am I missing something in the story. If somebody can break this announcement down with what it potentially means.
 

JoshuaTurner

macrumors newbie
Oct 18, 2012
20
2
Won't change much. Compared to Chrome, the feature set is terrible. I'm not talking about "Extensions" other user facing features.
As a frontend developer, I see every day quirks and stuff that Safari doesn't support and chrome does.

As a backend and frontend developer I am exposed to more frameworks and features. You are wrong. Still I'd like to know why you think the way you do, please do tell specifics.
 

C DM

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Oct 17, 2011
51,392
19,460
I'm not sure how you concluded that Apple is bringing Safari back to Windows? Am I missing something in the story. If somebody can break this announcement down with what it potentially means.
Doesn't seem the questions that were posed implied that anything like that was mentioned or implied by the story--just questions related to the topic that someone had.
 

oneMadRssn

macrumors 603
Sep 8, 2011
6,019
14,118
Well, I found it. I found the story about why Safari on Windows was abandoned:




That excerpt came from Don Melton on his website. Very interesting post, highly recommend checking it out.

https://donmelton.com/2014/04/10/memories-of-steve/

Very cool story, enjoyed reading it. However, doesn't really answer the "why." Because Steve said no is not really a satisfactory answer, ya know? Why did Steve say no to advertising it more? I think it's because there was no benefit to it, Apple would derive no advantage even if it did succeed in an advertising campaign, when Google and a few others were doing a fine job at that time making WebKit browsers for Windows.
 
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PizzaBoxStyle

macrumors 6502
Dec 11, 2014
321
412
Apple HQ Cupterino Spaceship
Very cool story, enjoyed reading it. However, doesn't really answer the "why." Because Steve said no is not really a satisfactory answer, ya know? Why did Steve say no to advertising it more? I think it's because there was no benefit to it, Apple would derive no advantage even if it did succeed in an advertising campaign, when Google and a few others were doing a fine job at that time making WebKit browsers for Windows.

He probably didn't want to give those Windows users another reason to hang on to their sad 5-year old Windows laptops. /s ;)
 
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mfvisuals

macrumors regular
Sep 9, 2009
193
71
SacTown, CA
I'm not sure how you concluded that Apple is bringing Safari back to Windows? Am I missing something in the story. If somebody can break this announcement down with what it potentially means.

I think you have experienced a reading comprehension failure. That poster never said he though Safari was coming back to Windows.
 

mscuthbert

macrumors newbie
Aug 1, 2014
27
94
Cambridge, Mass.
For developers, this 98% on the ES6 compatibility table is very welcome (up from 53% on Safari 9.1)
 

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nvmls

Suspended
Mar 31, 2011
1,941
5,219
Safari is lacking a bit on the devs end imo, inspector, while improved and also now featuring a responsive design preview, feels a bit laggy & unpolished, clicking on classes or IDs to copy them could be improved, increasing element dimensions/border/numbers with up and down keyboard arrows (after clicking on value) could be a good addition too and when you press the enter key while adding CSS properties to a class/id/element through the inspector the cursor sometimes break the property line into two words or jumps back up to the line where another property is, so I find this interesting and will give it a try.

If you have several pinned tabs and several conventional tabs open at the same time, managing them horizontally to the sides is lacking optimization (chrome or firefox handle this much better, they could use some ideas from here).

On a side note, I really don't get why they won't use favicons as pinned tab icons, as it is, favicons in the URL bar, are not even visible, unless you click on the URL bar while on active site.

The advantages of favicon to the actual pinned icons are immense:
-multicolor support.
-big help to visualize several tabs open (currently it's just text).
-no need to clear pinned icon cache folder consistently (which isn't very handy) for safari to show changes.
-no need to include another line of code (link rel="mask-icon").
-multi-platform support.
 
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Glassed Silver

macrumors 68020
Mar 10, 2007
2,096
2,567
Kassel, Germany
I strongly suspect any actual useful feedback coming from actual developers is going to be drowned out by the cacophony coming from the hipsters / fanboys / other people with too much free time on their hands.
Apple barely listens to feedback to begin with, it won't make a difference.

Glassed Silver:mac
 

Zirel

Suspended
Jul 24, 2015
2,196
3,008
Maybe they think about implementing such future features like favicons in the tabs... Safari sucks on usability so much.

Sorry, but that's your opinion, in my opinion that looks like a mess on Chrome.
 

atikalz

macrumors regular
Mar 22, 2016
233
306
Only Apple knows, why they don't follow usability and even common sense in design.
Absolutely no go without favicons.


Safari is lacking a bit on the devs end imo, inspector, while improved and also now featuring a responsive design preview, feels a bit laggy & unpolished, clicking on classes or IDs to copy them could be improved, increasing element dimensions/border/numbers with up and down keyboard arrows (after clicking on value) could be a good addition too and when you press the enter key while adding CSS properties to a class/id/element through the inspector the cursor sometimes break the property line into two words or jumps back up to the line where another property is, so I find this interesting and will give it a try.

If you have several pinned tabs and several conventional tabs open at the same time, managing them horizontally to the sides is lacking optimization (chrome or firefox handle this much better, they could use some ideas from here).

On a side note, I really don't get why they won't use favicons as pinned tab icons, as it is, favicons in the URL bar, are not even visible, unless you click on the URL bar while on active site.

The advantages of favicon to the actual pinned icons are immense:
-multicolor support.
-big help to visualize several tabs open (currently it's just text).
-no need to clear pinned icon cache folder consistently (which isn't very handy) for safari to show changes.
-no need to include another line of code (link rel="mask-icon").
-multi-platform support.
 
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