Apple Pay for Transit: Now Accepted in Singapore, NYC Testing Soon, Chicago and Portland to Integrate Fare Cards

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Apple Pay is launching or gaining expanded functionality at transit systems in additional cities throughout 2019, starting with Singapore today followed by Chicago, Portland, and New York City later this year.


Apple Pay is now accepted on all forms of public transit that accept Mastercard credit and debit cards in Singapore, including buses and trains, enabling convenient tap-to-pay functionality with an iPhone or Apple Watch. Singapore's transit agency expects to add support for Visa cards in the second half of 2019.

New York City will pilot Apple Pay on a couple of lines this spring and then roll out the functionality to additional lines throughout the rest of the year, according to TechCrunch's Matthew Panzarino. The MTA appears to already be in the process of installing contactless card readers at turnstiles, with a test phase "coming soon."

Woop woop Apple Pay coming soon to the subway #NYC #mta #SubWayLive #ApplePay #Metro pic.twitter.com/w2NjJN8Di5 - Pratik Patel (@Pratpatell) April 3, 2019

Chicago's and Portland's transit systems already accept Apple Pay, but CTA and TriMet riders will be able to add their preloaded Ventra and Hop fare cards to the Wallet app later this year and take advantage of pre-tax commuter benefits, according to the Chicago Tribune and the Willamette Week.

The payment process is similar to using Apple Pay in stores. Depending on the iPhone, that means double-pressing the home button or side button, authenticating with Touch ID or Face ID, and holding the iPhone near the card reader. Apple Watch payments are also activated by double-pressing the side button.

The blog Ata Distance suggests that Ventra and Hop cards will support Express Transit, meaning that riders won't need to authenticate with Face ID, Touch ID, or a passcode, and won't need to wake or unlock their device, to pay. Express Transit is currently limited to transit systems in China and Japan.

Singapore and New York City would join a handful of cities with transit systems that already support Apple Pay, including Chicago and Portland as mentioned, Beijing, Shanghai, London, Tokyo, Moscow, and Vancouver, Canada.

(Thanks, Chris!)

Article Link: Apple Pay for Transit: Now Accepted in Singapore, NYC Testing Soon, Chicago and Portland to Integrate Fare Cards
 

Amadeo

macrumors member
Jul 11, 2008
98
56
I did notice that they installed the new terminals at the 7 train Grand Central entrance over by 3rd Ave. If it doesn't support my unlimited card, though, I'll have to wait on usage :(
 
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agsystems

macrumors 65816
Aug 1, 2013
1,022
901
"Apple Pay is launching or gaining expanded functionality New York City later this year."
about time - welcome to the 20/21th century - NY Subways are a mess and this could make your way around the city better
 

zorinlynx

macrumors 603
May 31, 2007
6,022
8,487
Florida, USA
"that means double-pressing the home button or side button, authenticating with Touch ID or Face ID, and holding the iPhone near the card reader."

This takes too long. I know it seems fast, but I've been in NYC and ridden the subway quite a few times and it's a constant flow of people through the turnstiles, each person swiping their card through as they're walking.

If there's any kind of delay, like having to satisfy FaceID or wait for TouchID, it's going to slow things down and people will get pissed. Nevermind that TouchID doesn't work with gloves on and NYC has winter, and FaceID doesn't always read correctly.

If I were a New Yorker I wouldn't bother with using my phone and just get the Contactless MetroCard equivalent they're no doubt going to offer.
 

spoa94

macrumors 6502a
Oct 12, 2011
764
318
New Orleans, LA
I would hope you wouldn't need to authenticate to get it to work. Would be alot easier if you just hold phone to reader, phone realizes it's a subway terminal and loads that specific card, and boom you're in. I could see alot of people fumbling around getting the right pass up on their phones, standing there authenticating with FaceID, then scanning, and causing a backup. IMO the ticket wouldn't really need to be secured behind FaceID and should pop up automatically when presented at a subway terminal.
 

zorinlynx

macrumors 603
May 31, 2007
6,022
8,487
Florida, USA
I would hope you wouldn't need to authenticate to get it to work. Would be alot easier if you just hold phone to reader, phone realizes it's a subway terminal and loads that specific card, and boom you're in. I could see alot of people fumbling around getting the right pass up on their phones, standing there authenticating with FaceID, then scanning, and causing a backup. IMO the ticket wouldn't really need to be secured behind FaceID and should pop up automatically when presented at a subway terminal.
Exactly! I've seen the frustration that happens when a Metrocard won't read, both for that person and the people behind them who sometimes end up having to use another turnstile. Public transit is about keeping people moving and moving quickly. Even the small delay of having to authenticate will cause snarl-ups.
 

recoil80

macrumors 68030
Jul 16, 2014
2,938
2,546
Portland has a great system. No cards. Just use your credit card and it stops charging you once you reach the threshold for a full day pass.
Same in Milan. You can use the iPhone or Watch, it charges the single fare up to 3 times and then you have the full day pass so you're not charged anymore. You always have to use the device to exit a station, I think you're charged when you enter and it only checks if you card was associated to a payment when you exit, at no extra cost.

I have the annual season ticket and it would be great to use my devices to open the turnstiles. It would either require a special card in my wallet associated with the ticket, or they could charge me the full price of the season ticket once and don't charge me for the next 365 days. Otherwise they could allow third party apps to have a wider access to NFC so the app could take care of it. Now it is possible to read NFC data, but you can't open a turnstile without sending some data to it. That would be really great as I hate reaching out for my pocket to get the card every time I use public transport.
 
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RobNYC

macrumors 6502a
May 28, 2008
522
81
New York, NY
"that means double-pressing the home button or side button, authenticating with Touch ID or Face ID, and holding the iPhone near the card reader."

This takes too long. I know it seems fast, but I've been in NYC and ridden the subway quite a few times and it's a constant flow of people through the turnstiles, each person swiping their card through as they're walking.

If there's any kind of delay, like having to satisfy FaceID or wait for TouchID, it's going to slow things down and people will get pissed. Nevermind that TouchID doesn't work with gloves on and NYC has winter, and FaceID doesn't always read correctly.

If I were a New Yorker I wouldn't bother with using my phone and just get the Contactless MetroCard equivalent they're no doubt going to offer.
As Apple Pay works now, this would be slower than swiping your card though.
 
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caoimhin

macrumors member
May 11, 2006
67
42
Dublin
"that means double-pressing the home button or side button, authenticating with Touch ID or Face ID, and holding the iPhone near the card reader."

This takes too long. I know it seems fast, but I've been in NYC and ridden the subway quite a few times and it's a constant flow of people through the turnstiles, each person swiping their card through as they're walking.

If there's any kind of delay, like having to satisfy FaceID or wait for TouchID, it's going to slow things down and people will get pissed. Nevermind that TouchID doesn't work with gloves on and NYC has winter, and FaceID doesn't always read correctly.

If I were a New Yorker I wouldn't bother with using my phone and just get the Contactless MetroCard equivalent they're no doubt going to offer.
Maybe using your tap to pay card would be more convenient, but the authentication process is really not as big a problem as you suggest. Numerous metro systems around the world (some in very cold climates) already accept Apple Pay without any noticeable disruption.
 

ImpulseDOM

macrumors newbie
Apr 4, 2019
8
41
Ive been a long time lerker here at Macrumors but never joined in. Signed up to ask this question;

Everytime there is a news article about Apple Pay expanding in the USA i dont understand whats happening. Here in the UK, everywhere accepts it and it seemed to happen overnight. I can literately use Apple Pay for any purchase at any store. The only thing that took a while was the abolishing of the £30 limit Why is the USA slow? Am I missing something?
 
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Crowbot

macrumors 6502
May 29, 2018
472
1,233
NYC
"that means double-pressing the home button or side button, authenticating with Touch ID or Face ID, and holding the iPhone near the card reader."

This takes too long. I know it seems fast, but I've been in NYC and ridden the subway quite a few times and it's a constant flow of people through the turnstiles, each person swiping their card through as they're walking.

If there's any kind of delay, like having to satisfy FaceID or wait for TouchID, it's going to slow things down and people will get pissed. Nevermind that TouchID doesn't work with gloves on and NYC has winter, and FaceID doesn't always read correctly.

If I were a New Yorker I wouldn't bother with using my phone and just get the Contactless MetroCard equivalent they're no doubt going to offer.

I look forward to using my Watch instead of having to dig out my MetroCard (NYC). NFC is one of the big benefits of the Watch. A good number of people still don't know how to swipe their cards efficiently and people using it for the first time (tourists) sometimes need instruction from riders. Convenient, but it won't make a big difference.
 

bluespark

macrumors 68000
Jul 11, 2009
1,950
2,135
Chicago
To be clear, ApplePay has worked at all CTA (Chicago transit) locations since the day it was introduced. It even works on all city busses. The difference with this is that the funds can come out of your Ventra (pre-paid, pre-tax) allotment instead of your default payment method.
 

2ilent8cho

macrumors 6502
Mar 9, 2016
357
1,007
"that means double-pressing the home button or side button, authenticating with Touch ID or Face ID, and holding the iPhone near the card reader."

This takes too long. I know it seems fast, but I've been in NYC and ridden the subway quite a few times and it's a constant flow of people through the turnstiles, each person swiping their card through as they're walking.

If there's any kind of delay, like having to satisfy FaceID or wait for TouchID, it's going to slow things down and people will get pissed. Nevermind that TouchID doesn't work with gloves on and NYC has winter, and FaceID doesn't always read correctly.

If I were a New Yorker I wouldn't bother with using my phone and just get the Contactless MetroCard equivalent they're no doubt going to offer.
No it does not take too long, the UK has had this in London for years now and i use my Apple Watch everytime i go to use the Underground/Subway there, you just double tap the watch button a few seconds before getting to the turnstile and put it again the reader and you are in.
 

AdonisSMU

macrumors 604
Oct 23, 2010
6,602
2,172
"that means double-pressing the home button or side button, authenticating with Touch ID or Face ID, and holding the iPhone near the card reader."

This takes too long. I know it seems fast, but I've been in NYC and ridden the subway quite a few times and it's a constant flow of people through the turnstiles, each person swiping their card through as they're walking.

If there's any kind of delay, like having to satisfy FaceID or wait for TouchID, it's going to slow things down and people will get pissed. Nevermind that TouchID doesn't work with gloves on and NYC has winter, and FaceID doesn't always read correctly.

If I were a New Yorker I wouldn't bother with using my phone and just get the Contactless MetroCard equivalent they're no doubt going to offer.
You could prepare it as you are walking up like before you get there. Then just hold it up there.
 

AndyDiamond

macrumors 6502
Jul 12, 2004
364
320
The Black Lodge
saw a test one at Atlantic Barclays - cool.

So can you load up a MTA Metro Card and add that to your Apple Wallet?
Or is this simply a one time ride thing that comes out of your regular credit/debit card?
 

Crowbot

macrumors 6502
May 29, 2018
472
1,233
NYC
Ive been a long time lerker here at Macrumors but never joined in. Signed up to ask this question;

Everytime there is a news article about Apple Pay expanding in the USA i dont understand whats happening. Here in the UK, everywhere accepts it and it seemed to happen overnight. I can literately use Apple Pay for any purchase at any store. The only thing that took a while was the abolishing of the £30 limit Why is the USA slow? Am I missing something?

Welcome!

The USA can sometimes seem to be behind when it comes to embracing new tech. National standards are hard to develop and enforce, maybe because the individual states have to go along. On this subject, NYC was very late in introducing card entry. We used tokens until they were finally phased out on '03. I'm still faxing to and from my insurance company and most of my doctor's offices. It is frustrating.
 

citysnaps

macrumors 603
Oct 10, 2011
5,990
9,734
San Francisco
"that means double-pressing the home button or side button, authenticating with Touch ID or Face ID, and holding the iPhone near the card reader."

This takes too long. I know it seems fast, but I've been in NYC and ridden the subway quite a few times and it's a constant flow of people through the turnstiles, each person swiping their card through as they're walking.

If there's any kind of delay, like having to satisfy FaceID or wait for TouchID, it's going to slow things down and people will get pissed. Nevermind that TouchID doesn't work with gloves on and NYC has winter, and FaceID doesn't always read correctly.

If I were a New Yorker I wouldn't bother with using my phone and just get the Contactless MetroCard equivalent they're no doubt going to offer.
I suspect that will be considerably streamlined for transit charges.
 
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recoil80

macrumors 68030
Jul 16, 2014
2,938
2,546
No it does not take too long, the UK has had this in London for years now and i use my Apple Watch everytime i go to use the Underground/Subway there, you just double tap the watch button a few seconds before getting to the turnstile and put it again the reader and you are in.
The Watch is super convenient as you don't have to reach for your phone or the wallet to get the card. I only use Apple pay on the iPhone if I'm on an app, I think I never tried to pay at a POS with my iPhone as the Watch is way better.

Can you use your season ticket on the Watch in London?
 
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alexandr

macrumors 65832
Nov 11, 2005
1,504
1,939
11201-121099
"that means double-pressing the home button or side button, authenticating with Touch ID or Face ID, and holding the iPhone near the card reader."

This takes too long. I know it seems fast, but I've been in NYC and ridden the subway quite a few times and it's a constant flow of people through the turnstiles, each person swiping their card through as they're walking.

If there's any kind of delay, like having to satisfy FaceID or wait for TouchID, it's going to slow things down and people will get pissed. Nevermind that TouchID doesn't work with gloves on and NYC has winter, and FaceID doesn't always read correctly.

If I were a New Yorker I wouldn't bother with using my phone and just get the Contactless MetroCard equivalent they're no doubt going to offer.
you're overthinking it - almost every day there is some dumbass blocking a turnstile while trying to locate his/her metrocard. they will just be replaced by the dumbasses who fail to unlock their phone prior to reaching the turnstile.
 

xMagnusx

macrumors newbie
Aug 1, 2010
7
9
"that means double-pressing the home button or side button, authenticating with Touch ID or Face ID, and holding the iPhone near the card reader."

This takes too long. I know it seems fast, but I've been in NYC and ridden the subway quite a few times and it's a constant flow of people through the turnstiles, each person swiping their card through as they're walking.

If there's any kind of delay, like having to satisfy FaceID or wait for TouchID, it's going to slow things down and people will get pissed. Nevermind that TouchID doesn't work with gloves on and NYC has winter, and FaceID doesn't always read correctly.

If I were a New Yorker I wouldn't bother with using my phone and just get the Contactless MetroCard equivalent they're no doubt going to offer.
This reminds me of a guy today who rushed to the start of the queue only to realise his card is in the wallet and the wallet inside his bag.
 

AndyDiamond

macrumors 6502
Jul 12, 2004
364
320
The Black Lodge
Welcome!

The USA can sometimes seem to be behind when it comes to embracing new tech. National standards are hard to develop and enforce, maybe because the individual states have to go along. On this subject, NYC was very late in introducing card entry. We used tokens until they were finally phased out on '03. I'm still faxing to and from my insurance company and most of my doctor's offices. It is frustrating.

goodamn it - yes! WHY is a fax machine still in use in 2019!
 
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