Apple Pay in the UK

Mr.C

macrumors 601
Apr 3, 2011
4,500
598
London, UK.
TfL has been phasing out (or discouraging, at least) Oyster for a while, in favour of payment with contactless bank cards or Apple Pay.

Problems with Oyster (from TfL’s perspective) include the high cost of administering the system, crowds and queues at stations with people topping up cards, and big liabilities on their balance sheet for balances on old, inactive cards (which never expire!).

The only good reason to have an Oyster card now days is if you have a monthly or annual pass, are a child, or qualify for certain discounts that aren’t available on contactless.

For these cases, it would certainly be nice to have a digital Oyster card, but it’s only a small percentage of TfL customers that fit into these categories.
Thanks. That’s interesting and I guess makes sense. I do have a monthly pass so I use an Oyster card. And I know some people claiming unemployment benefit can get 50% off travel and need an Oyster card. Still it would be nice if I could have a virtual electronic Oyster card in my Apple wallet.
 

nicho

macrumors 68030
Feb 15, 2008
2,862
1,364
The only good reason to have an Oyster card now days is if you have a monthly or annual pass, are a child, or qualify for certain discounts that aren’t available on contactless.
Aside from the child ones, you'd think the others would be achievable through smarter capping. Monthly and annual capping. Same for other discounts.
 

Paul_W

macrumors member
Jun 8, 2016
72
34
Rutland, UK
B&Q have finally enabled contactless (at least in Melton Mowbray anyway). I don’t know if they’re supporting limitless Apple Pay as I was only buy a paint test pot
 
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Furzul

macrumors 6502a
Jan 13, 2013
587
259
Derbyshire, England
Just tried to pay for a Apple Watch 4 (on the online Apple store) for the wife using Apple Pay (£319). It said the transaction was declined, then I paid with the same CC without Apple Pay and it sailed through. This was on my Lloyd’s CC, does anybody know what limit Lloyd’s puts on Apple Pay?
 

Bazooka-joe

macrumors 68040
Mar 12, 2012
3,097
1,386
Swindon, England
Just tried to pay for a Apple Watch 4 (on the online Apple store) for the wife using Apple Pay (£319). It said the transaction was declined, then I paid with the same CC without Apple Pay and it sailed through. This was on my Lloyd’s CC, does anybody know what limit Lloyd’s puts on Apple Pay?
I had the same issue when I ordered my AirPod Pros and had to go down the Visa card route. That was Lloyds as well. I need to pop in to Lloyds tomorrow so I will ask them if there is a limit
 

Furzul

macrumors 6502a
Jan 13, 2013
587
259
Derbyshire, England
I had the same issue when I ordered my AirPod Pros and had to go down the Visa card route. That was Lloyds as well. I need to pop in to Lloyds tomorrow so I will ask them if there is a limit
Just been on the phone to them. They think there is a limit on Apple pay, but not sure how much. I tried to explain that Apple Pay is more secure than putting my CC details in on the internet, but to be honest I can get more sense talking to my spaniel.
 

Mr.C

macrumors 601
Apr 3, 2011
4,500
598
London, UK.
Apple it self has no limit on it’s online store or retail stores so it’s strange a bank would put a limit on transactions with Apple. 🤔
 

iGeek2019

macrumors regular
Jul 26, 2019
117
108
United Kingdom
On Lloyds' website for Apple Pay it says the following:

To protect you from fraud, we may restrict the value or number of payments you can make using Apple Pay, so please make sure you carry your debit and credit cards with you just in case. Some retailers will also limit individual payments to £30.

As posted before from next year I *think* retailers have to offer contactless payments as part of some form of mandate from MasterCard?
 

Furzul

macrumors 6502a
Jan 13, 2013
587
259
Derbyshire, England
When I phoned Lloyd’s last night to inquire about this, the chap I talked to did say that a debit card was limitless, but a CC had a limit on it, although he did not sound to sure. Could it be something to do with what Lloyd’s would have to pay out on a debit vs a CC in the case of fraud?
 

Bazooka-joe

macrumors 68040
Mar 12, 2012
3,097
1,386
Swindon, England
When I phoned Lloyd’s last night to inquire about this, the chap I talked to did say that a debit card was limitless, but a CC had a limit on it, although he did not sound to sure. Could it be something to do with what Lloyd’s would have to pay out on a debit vs a CC in the case of fraud?
Apple Pay linked to a lloyds debit card is not limitless for me as I couldn't pay for Airpods Pro through the Apple store. I hope to sort that out with lloyds on saturday
 

Bazooka-joe

macrumors 68040
Mar 12, 2012
3,097
1,386
Swindon, England
I'm sure I remember a report saying Lloyds restricted ApplePay to £100.
I can't find that but on Lloyds site, they say
"To protect you from fraud, we may restrict the value or number of payments you can make using Apple Pay, so please make sure you carry your debit and credit cards with you just in case. Some retailers will also limit individual payments to £30."

It may be possible to change the spending limit through a personal request. I will speak to them on Saturday and see what they say
 

KaPOWitsCHRIS

macrumors 6502
Apr 8, 2010
484
89
Coventry, UK
I find it silly that Lloyds would restrict it, Apple Pay is the most secure payment method there is if I am not mistaken. It can't be skimmed like using a physical card, you need your fingerprint or face to be able to use it, opposed to someone to guessing a PIN or just having the physical card in their possession - makes no sense why they'd do that, to me at least.
 
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akash.nu

macrumors 604
May 26, 2016
7,897
8,838
I find it silly that Lloyds would restrict it, Apple Pay is the most secure payment method there is if I am not mistaken. It can't be skimmed like using a physical card, you need your fingerprint or face to be able to use it, opposed to someone to guessing a PIN or just having the physical card in their possession - makes no sense why they'd do that, to me at least.
Because it’s a black box and not a proprietary technology. This means to test and confirm it’s fit for purpose. Until then I guess they have to restrict to mitigate the risk.