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Apple this week announced that it has expanded its Independent Repair Provider Program to include Mac repairs. Apple has since outlined further details about the initiative in an internal document obtained by MacRumors.

mac-repair-generic.jpg

The internal document states the following:
  • Qualifying repair shops can gain access to Apple genuine parts, tools, and training starting August 17
  • The program covers all Mac models
  • The program is limited to out-of-warranty Mac repairs
  • Examples of components eligible for repair include the display, logic board, and top case, the latter of which includes the keyboard, trackpad, speakers, and battery
  • Participating repair shops must have Apple-certified technicians perform the repairs
  • Participating repair shops are not permitted to offer whole-unit replacements for Macs
  • Participating repair shops cannot ship Macs to an Apple repair center
Apple first launched the program for out-of-warranty iPhone repairs in the United States last year and expanded it to Canada and Europe last month. Apple's website has more details, but it has yet to be updated to reflect the inclusion of Mac repairs.

Update: Apple has also repriced several Mac repair parts for technicians. While some parts are now lower in price, several have increased by up to hundreds of dollars, such as 13-inch MacBook Pro displays.

Article Link: Apple Provides More Details About Independent Repair Provider Program for Macs
 
Last edited:

4jasontv

Suspended
Jul 31, 2011
4,072
4,437
With COVID Apple can’t handle all repairs so they are providing opportunities for other repair centers so Apple can help their customers today. This is going to bite Apple if the world opens up faster than expected. Repair centers might expect similar parts in the future.
 
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CWallace

macrumors G3
Aug 17, 2007
8,470
5,012
Seattle, WA
So only an authorized tech can do the repair (understandable) but they can’t service IN warranty products!?!?🤷‍♂️ Why not? What is the difference between a trained authorized technician working at a 3rd party retail and repair center vs at a place doing out of warranty only?

Hazarding a guess that it is to appease existing Authorized Service Provider Program members (who can perform in-warranty repairs) so they do not lose that business to these independent shops.
 
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Rocko99991

macrumors 65816
Jul 25, 2017
1,205
1,433
So only an authorized tech can do the repair (understandable) but they can’t service IN warranty products!?!?🤷‍♂️ Why not? What is the difference between a trained authorized technician working at a 3rd party retail and repair center vs at a place doing out of warranty only?
Because Apple doesn't want to work on your device(warranty claim) that has been worked on(repaired damage you did) by someone else.
 
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insoft.uk

macrumors member
Mar 15, 2018
94
35
Anything to prevent us from repairing our own equipment, just a ploy by Apple to look like it’s doing something all PR BS, you can’t stock parts only obtain on requirements that can take upto two weeks so they know fine well a customer is not going to goto a repair shop and wait for weeks that another shop can do in a day or two.
 
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ouimetnick

macrumors 68040
Aug 28, 2008
3,083
4,270
Beverly, Massachusetts
Because Apple doesn't want to work on your device(warranty claim) that has been worked on(repaired damage you did) by someone else.

Why would any authorized and properly trained technician want to work on any device that was improperly repaired? Maybe I’m misunderstanding your post, but if the technician is properly trained like the ones who perform warranty work, what difference does it make? All techs can make mistakes sometimes. I asked the genius that replaced my iPhone’s battery and he mentioned that occasionally they damage things. (Apple then replaces the damaged component or replaced the device)

I’m being trained on board level repair and rework, something that NO Apple technician is trained to do (by Apple) Apple doesn’t even allow techs to do board level work. The bad logic boards and other assemblies have to be mailed back. They then are sent to China to be refurbished and added back into parts inventory. I was an ACMT for 3 years and never made a mistake on a computer. I also fixed iPhones on the side and damaged a iPhone 4S during a screen repair. It happens.

What I won’t work on are devices that are missing components, missing screws, damaged cables, etc. A good technician doesn’t leave a trace when he/she is done unless they have to micky-mouse someone’s botched repair attempt.
 
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Blackstick

macrumors 6502a
Aug 11, 2014
768
3,337
Sunny South Florida
Why would any authorized and properly trained technician want to work on any device that was improperly repaired? Maybe I’m misunderstanding your post, but if the technician is properly trained like the ones who perform warranty work, what difference does it make? All techs can make mistakes sometimes. I asked the genius that replaced my iPhone’s battery and he mentioned that occasionally they damage things. (Apple then replaces the damaged component or replaced the device)

I’m being trained on board level repair and rework, something that NO Apple technician is trained to do (by Apple) Apple doesn’t even allow techs to do board level work. The bad logic boards and other assemblies have to be mailed back. They then are sent to China to be refurbished and added back into parts inventory. I was an ACMT for 3 years and never made a mistake on a computer. I also fixed iPhones on the side and damaged a iPhone 4S during a screen repair. It happens.

What I won’t work on are devices that are missing components, missing screws, damaged cables, etc. A good technician doesn’t leave a trace when he/she is done unless they have to micky-mouse someone’s botched repair attempt.

Absolutely. Mac Genius from 2007-2014... mistakes happen in the Genius Room (to some techs, very frequently), but when that product is finally marked RFP (ready for pickup), there should be no trace you ever worked on it.

We'd deny service for tampered devices on a daily basis. When I left in 2014, the latest scammer craze was iPads that wouldn't power on, turns out they were devoid of parts inside and filled with modeling cement... we had to start weighing them.
 
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dguisinger

macrumors 6502a
Jul 25, 2002
868
1,276
Why would any authorized and properly trained technician want to work on any device that was improperly repaired? Maybe I’m misunderstanding your post, but if the technician is properly trained like the ones who perform warranty work, what difference does it make? All techs can make mistakes sometimes. I asked the genius that replaced my iPhone’s battery and he mentioned that occasionally they damage things. (Apple then replaces the damaged component or replaced the device)

I’m being trained on board level repair and rework, something that NO Apple technician is trained to do (by Apple) Apple doesn’t even allow techs to do board level work. The bad logic boards and other assemblies have to be mailed back. They then are sent to China to be refurbished and added back into parts inventory. I was an ACMT for 3 years and never made a mistake on a computer. I also fixed iPhones on the side and damaged a iPhone 4S during a screen repair. It happens.

What I won’t work on are devices that are missing components, missing screws, damaged cables, etc. A good technician doesn’t leave a trace when he/she is done unless they have to micky-mouse someone’s botched repair attempt.


I wouldn't say its that, I would say its about who they are paying.

If Apple is repairing it themselves, they are paying their own employees
If someone else is doing warranty work, Apple needs to pay their business, which makes a profit, to make the repair.

It just costs Apple more

If its out of warranty, you are paying for it, so Apple doesn't care.
 
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Blackstick

macrumors 6502a
Aug 11, 2014
768
3,337
Sunny South Florida
"The program covers all Mac models"
I don't think so. :rolleyes:
Okay I need my PowerBook G4 1Ghz repaired.
Yep, Macs are vintage at 5 years and obsolete at 7 years... unless you live in California and a few other locales, it's essentially the same story - Apple no longer makes the parts or offers support, use at your own pleasure/risk.

That being said, my wife's on a 2012 MacBook Air, my mom uses a 2011 iMac... these things never die.
 
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DonutHands

macrumors 6502
Dec 20, 2011
278
231
Los Angeles
Parts available: display, logic board, and top case.
All ridiculously overpriced for an out of warranty repair and would make no sense for a consumer to go anywhere else but Apple to have these items replaced.
Any shop that employees a technician certified to do a repair like this is going to have to charge a decent amount of labor for these repairs, maybe $100 on average, while Apple will charge some amazingly low labor charge of $25-35 or often times free.
Also the independent shop will mark up the cost of the part, at minimum 10% to cover shipping and credit card fees. Apple sells the parts to their customers at nearly the same cost they sell to the independent repair shops.
 
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kengeon

macrumors newbie
Nov 21, 2019
12
21
What a disappointment. It really seems that the only way Apple will do the right thing and allow us to buy individual components for board repairs instead of pricey board replacements is to force them via legislation.
 
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ouimetnick

macrumors 68040
Aug 28, 2008
3,083
4,270
Beverly, Massachusetts
If Apple is serious (they aren’t) they would also allow people to purchase replacement components at a reasonable cost.

Before the say that Apple shouldn’t be responsible for people doing repairs incorrectly and blaming Apple for the poor quality repair, answer this: Why do automobile dealerships sell components and other parts to customers? I needed a new coolant tank for my RX-8, and my local Mazda dealership ordered it and sold it to me. I’m a hobbyist with skill. Had I not replaced it correctly, the car could have lost coolant while driving leaving me stranded on the highway (but I wouldn’t be blaming Mazda) If I was stupid and didn’t know what I was doing I could have burned myself if I opened Up the coolant when the engine was warm.

I was able to go to my local appliance shop for my old MayTag dishwasher and purchase a new control panel. I found the part diagram and part number online, called the shop, paid over the phone and picked it up a week later.

I just want to be able to purchase components at a reasonable price to fix my stuff when the need arises.
It would be nice for actual repair shops to be able to have access to board level schematics, although even Apple authorized service centers do not have this ability. I don’t see what is super confidential about a logic board schematic for a 6 year old MacBook Pro (Mid 2014)

I would at least like to see some legislation passed forcing Apple to release the same service manuals I had access to when I was a ACMT and for Apple to sell components to anyone willing to sign a waiver or at least allow me to go to an Apple Store or other authorized repair center to order replacement parts. If I know the part number I need, I should be able to order it at the Apple Store or authorized repair center, pay and pick it up in a week.
 
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citysnaps

macrumors 604
Oct 10, 2011
7,207
12,377
San Francisco
What a disappointment. It really seems that the only way Apple will do the right thing and allow us to buy individual components for board repairs instead of pricey board replacements is to force them via legislation.

That will never happen. Why would Apple want to be in the parts supply business? Theres no money or reasonable profit to be made there. And if there were, you wouldn't want to pay Apple's prices, anyway.
 
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