Become a MacRumors Supporter for $25/year with no ads, private forums, and more!
  • Did you order new AirTags? We've opened a dedicated AirTags forum.

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
52,410
14,111
https://www.macrumors.com/images/macrumorsthreadlogodarkd.png

Research firm Canalys today announced the release of its latest estimates of computer sales for the fourth quarter of 2010, showing Apple jumping to third place in worldwide market share at 10.8% when tablets such as the iPad are counted as computers.


093158-canalys_4q2010_pc_share.jpg


With the iPad surging into the market, Canalys calculates Apple's unit shipment growth at 241% year-over-year to catapult the company from a 3.8% global share to its present 10.8% share that squeaks by Dell for third place behind HP and Acer.

In support of the inclusion of "pad" devices such as the iPad and Samsung's Galaxy Tab in its PC market numbers, Canalys argues that the definition of the PC has constantly been evolving and that tablet devices like the iPad do offer a true computing experience.
'Any argument that a pad is not a PC is simply out of sync,' said Chiam. 'With screen sizes of seven inches or above, ample processing power, and a growing number of applications, pads offer a computing experience comparable to netbooks. They compete for the same customers and will happily coexist. As with smart phones, some users will require a physical keyboard, while others will do without.'

'Each new product category typically causes a significant shift in market shares,' said Chiam. 'Apple is benefiting from pads, just as Acer, Samsung and Asus previously did with netbooks. The PC industry has always evolved this way, starting when Toshiba and Compaq rode high on the original notebook wave.'
Several reports showed Apple claiming third place in the global mobile computing market in earlier quarters, but the new Canalys report appears to be the first showing Apple attaining the position in the overall (notebook/desktop/server) market.

Article Link: Apple Ranks Third in Global PC Sales With iPad Included
 

talkingfuture

macrumors 65816
Dec 4, 2008
1,216
0
The back of beyond.
Thats even more impressive when you think about costs as well, many of those Dell's and HP's will have cost less than an iPad. I wonder if/when they will hit number 1?
 
Comment

iStudentUK

macrumors 65816
Mar 8, 2009
1,439
4
London
Apple is the largest when you add iPods and iPhones! Although Walmart is the largest if you include food products!

The point is you can't just add on iPad, Galaxy sales etc and get a good comparison. Tablets are not yet proper computers, some people buy them to replace a computer, but many others purchase them as an addition.

Stats abuse strikes again!
 
Comment

ArtOfWarfare

macrumors G3
Nov 26, 2007
9,123
5,091
I definitely don't count an iPad as a computer. It's a substitute for and has similar capablilities as a computer, but it isn't.

Why?

1.) You must own another computer to set it up.

and

2.) You can't write applications for it on it.

Yes, I'm thinking I'll get an iPad 2 next year for school rather than a laptop, but that's because the laptop was never the proper device for the job in the first place.
 
Comment

TimUSCA

macrumors 6502a
Mar 17, 2006
696
1,536
Aiken, SC
I'm a self-proclaimed Apple fanboy, and I don't think iPads should be included with PC sales. They're an extension to a computer - very few people use them as their only machine. And without any sort of file structure that one can navigate freely, it serves a completely different market than PCs do.

Don't get me wrong , the sales numbers are very impressive. But saying they're 3rd in global PC sales is a bit of a stretch. Sure, you could say everyone else can include tablets in their sales as well, but when Apple are the only ones who are mainstream, it's an easy statistic to blow out of proportion.
 
Comment

tatonka

macrumors 6502
Aug 25, 2009
495
40
I don't know that iPads (or any other tablet for that matter) should be included in PC sales. Why not include iPods then? I can do exactly the same things on both ..

Netbooks in the PC sale are pushing it, but at least you can operate those on their own without the need to have a second machine to set them up and update them.

T.
 
Comment

OllyW

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 11, 2005
17,113
6,499
The Black Country, England
I'm a self-proclaimed Apple fanboy, and I don't think iPads should be included with PC sales. They're an extension to a computer - very few people use them as their only machine. And without any sort of file structure that one can navigate freely, it serves a completely different market than PCs do.

Don't get me wrong , the sales numbers are very impressive. But saying they're 3rd in global PC sales is a bit of a stretch. Sure, you could say everyone else can include tablets in their sales as well, but when Apple are the only ones who are mainstream, it's an easy statistic to blow out of proportion.

I agree with you (apart from the bit about being a fanboy). :D

The iPad is an impressive device but it isn't a proper computer.
 
Comment

caseydriscoll

macrumors newbie
Nov 29, 2010
6
0
I agree with this definition

I definitely don't count an iPad as a computer. It's a substitute for and has similar capablilities as a computer, but it isn't.

Why?

1.) You must own another computer to set it up.

and

2.) You can't write applications for it on it.

Yes, I'm thinking I'll get an iPad 2 next year for school rather than a laptop, but that's because the laptop was never the proper device for the job in the first place.

The lines are definitely blurring, but I like the line this creates. We may not be too far from these capabilities, but until we have them, the iPad and Tab are not real "computers" in this sense. They should not be added to the mix.

PS2 and Wii aren't computers either.
 
Comment

Frosticus

macrumors 6502a
Oct 4, 2010
528
2
Bristol, UK
Impressive figures, although I too agree that the tablet/pad figures should not be included - it's a very different device category. It's not like the difference between a desktop and a laptop, it's much more than that.
 
Comment

NoExpectations

macrumors 6502a
Sep 23, 2008
671
2
New Definition Required

Yes, iPad should be included as a "PC".

Now, what about iPhone, iPod Touch, and other smart phones (IE..Moto Atrix that can dock into a external display)? They are all mobile "PC"s.
 
Comment

BaldiMac

macrumors 604
Jan 24, 2008
7,411
8,596
I definitely don't count an iPad as a computer. It's a substitute for and has similar capablilities as a computer, but it isn't.

Why?

1.) You must own another computer to set it up.

No, you don't have to own another computer to set it up. You just have to connect if briefly to another computer to activate it. Actually, it's similar to Windows in that way.

and

2.) You can't write applications for it on it.

:confused: Most people don't write applications on their computers.

Yes, I'm thinking I'll get an iPad 2 next year for school rather than a laptop, but that's because the laptop was never the proper device for the job in the first place.

That would imply that they are in the same market if you are choosing between the two to accomplish the same tasks. This is a market analysis, not a technical definition analysis.

iPad is not a computer.
If you add iPad why don't you add iPod Touch too?

You wouldn't include an iPod touch in a PC market analysis, because the iPod touch doesn't compete in the PC market. A significant number of people have not been shown to buy an iPod touch instead of a laptop or desktop.
 
Comment

gnasher729

Suspended
Nov 25, 2005
17,945
5,490
There are several aspects: There are bragging rights, there is reality, there is sale numbers.

For bragging rights, iPad sales obviously need to be included. On the other hand, Apple would probably prefer if nobody told Microsoft, Acer (who seems to have suffered most from iPad sales) and others what is going on. I think Apple is quite happy making loads of money while Gartner tells the world that they are not even in the top five in world-wide computer sales.

There is reality, which tells us that Apple is selling an awful lot of devices with large screens that are used for things that people used to use a traditional computer for. This is like asking if we should count Blu-ray sales under DVD sales; we shouldn't if we want to know about DVD sales, we should if we are really interested in movie sales. And these iPads are not exactly cheap; there are an awful lot of so-called computers that are actually netbooks that are a lot less useful and a lot cheaper than an iPad. And the iPads do take away PC sales, so they are in the same market. Like DVD and Blu-ray: Not the same thing, but the same market.

And then there is the question of the Microsoft OS monopoly. We can take the number of interesting computing devices, and check what percentage of those has an operating system that is not a Microsoft operating system. And I would count desktops, laptops, netbooks, and all tablets under "interesting computing devices". A year ago it was almost completely Microsoft, with a small percentage of MacOS X, a tiny percentage of Linux, and an even tinier percentage of others like Solaris. If we look a year ahead, there is still a small percentage of MacOS X, a tiny percentage of Linux, and an even tinier percentage of others like Solaris, but a quite considerable percentage of iOS and probably a reasonable amount of Android as well. I can easily see 15% percent of non-Microsoft OS on computing devices sold this year, and 25% next year, especially if you consider that many of these iPads and Android tablets will mean fewer netbook or laptop sales with Windows.


Yet more evidence that iPad sales should not be included in the comparison. It just doesn't compete significantly with desktops and laptops.

Look at Acer's sales. They sold a shedload of netbooks the year before, and then came the iPad and destroyed it.


The same could be said about netbooks.

Again, the same could have been said about netbooks.

People were complaining all the time that Apple wasn't selling a netbook. Let's try to think logically: Apple still doesn't sell a netbook. If the iPad is a computer, then this is fine, because the iPad can be viewed as an alternative to the netbook, and one that sells very well. If the iPad is _not_ a computer, then everyone should still be complaining that Apple is _still_ not selling a netbook. Has anybody heard these complaints in the last year since the iPad was released? I haven't. So it seems that the world has actually accepted that the iPad is a computer.
 
Last edited:
Comment

Popeye206

macrumors 68040
Sep 6, 2007
3,148
836
NE PA USA
Yet more evidence that iPad sales should not be included in the comparison. It just doesn't compete significantly with desktops and laptops.

I have to disagree. I'm guessing many iPad owners bought an iPad instead of a laptop or netbook. Although it's not as powerful as a stand along PC it does a lot and gives many customers all they need for a computer. So, given it's taking away PC sales, I'm sure this is why they are counting it. If anything, the analysts see that Tablets are creating a new category and have to be placed somewhere.

I do think it's questionable right now to count it as a true PC, but I'm guessing as they mature along with other tablets, it will become clear they are as much of a PC as the rest of them.
 
Comment

res1233

macrumors 65816
Dec 8, 2008
1,127
0
Brooklyn, NY
Yet more evidence that iPad sales should not be included in the comparison. It just doesn't compete significantly with desktops and laptops.

The question as to wether or not they should be included doesn't have much to do with who they compete with. For some people, the iPad fills their needs for everything they used to use a computer for. Just about the only thing that you CAN'T do, to my knowledge, is program apps for the iPad ON the iPad. There are some pretty good document creation apps for the iPad now, and if you get the keyboard dock, it's pretty easy to type on it aswell. I think it does compete with laptops to an extent, but not desktops. As jobs said, the desktop is like a truck, it will always be around. Sometimes a sedan just doesn't cut it. ;)

They shouldn't be included because most companies don't really have a similar product to the iPad. It IS a very different product from other PCs out there. The issue is, then what do these statistics companies compare it to? There isn't much available yet, and they have to do something, so this is the closest thing they have. We'll see true tablet comparisons once Android tablets start being released, as well as *cough* windows *cough* tablets.
 
Comment

BaldiMac

macrumors 604
Jan 24, 2008
7,411
8,596
I'm a self-proclaimed Apple fanboy, and I don't think iPads should be included with PC sales. They're an extension to a computer - very few people use them as their only machine. And without any sort of file structure that one can navigate freely, it serves a completely different market than PCs do.

The same could be said about netbooks. (Except for the file structure part, of course.)

Don't get me wrong , the sales numbers are very impressive. But saying they're 3rd in global PC sales is a bit of a stretch. Sure, you could say everyone else can include tablets in their sales as well, but when Apple are the only ones who are mainstream, it's an easy statistic to blow out of proportion.

Again, the same could have been said about netbooks.
 
Comment

teme

macrumors 6502
Jan 8, 2004
312
33
No, you don't have to own another computer to set it up. You just have to connect if briefly to another computer to activate it. Actually, it's similar to Windows in that way.

Please explain. You need to activate Windows using Internet, but you never need another computer to activate it. iPad can't be used until you have installed iTunes to another computer and connected iPad to that computer.
 
Comment
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.