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macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
59,215
23,134


Apple today released a Rapid Security Response update that is available for those running the iOS 16.2 beta, marking the launch of the second RSR update since the feature was released in iOS 16.

rapid-security-response.jpg

The Rapid Security Response Update is designed to provide iOS 16.2 beta users with bug fixes without the need to install a full update. The initial RSR release for iOS 16.2 beta users was a test with no actual bug fixes, and given the size of this update, it too is likely for testing the RSR system.

iOS Security Response 16.2 (b) is available through the standard Software Update mechanism in the Settings app, but is a quick update, requiring just a couple of minutes to download the update and then a quick restart for the install process.

Once the Rapid Security Response update is installed, iOS 16.2 users will see an updated version of iOS 16.2 (b), and tapping on the version in the About section of Settings will display information about the installed iOS version and the Rapid Security Response update. Those who want to disable Rapid Security Response updates can do so by following our how to.

Article Link: Apple Releases Another Rapid Security Response Update for iOS 16.2 Beta Users
 

Hails09

macrumors member
Apr 22, 2022
45
44
I get they need to test this but would it not have been better putting out iOS 16.2 beta first then security patch tomorrow.
 
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GSO

macrumors newbie
Jan 2, 2013
7
2


Apple today released a Rapid Security Response update that is available for those running the iOS 16.2 beta, marking the launch of the second RSR update since the feature was released in iOS 16.

rapid-security-response.jpg

The Rapid Security Response Update is designed to provide iOS 16.2 beta users with bug fixes without the need to install a full update. The initial RSR release for iOS 16.2 beta users was a test with no actual bug fixes, and given the size of this update, it too is likely for testing the RSR system.

iOS Security Response 16.2 (b) is available through the standard Software Update mechanism in the Settings app, but is a quick update, requiring just a couple of minutes to download the update and then a quick restart for the install process.

Once the Rapid Security Response update is installed, iOS 16.2 users will see an updated version of iOS 16.2 (b), and tapping on the version in the About section of Settings will display information about the installed iOS version and the Rapid Security Response update. Those who want to disable Rapid Security Response updates can do so by following our how to.

Article Link: Apple Releases Another Rapid Security Response Update for iOS 16.2 Beta Users
Be careful… it’s bricked my iPad Pro… I can’t even hard reboot…. It’s just stuck…
 

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macking104

macrumors 6502
Jan 14, 2003
338
12
California, USA


Apple today released a Rapid Security Response update that is available for those running the iOS 16.2 beta, marking the launch of the second RSR update since the feature was released in iOS 16.

rapid-security-response.jpg

The Rapid Security Response Update is designed to provide iOS 16.2 beta users with bug fixes without the need to install a full update. The initial RSR release for iOS 16.2 beta users was a test with no actual bug fixes, and given the size of this update, it too is likely for testing the RSR system.

iOS Security Response 16.2 (b) is available through the standard Software Update mechanism in the Settings app, but is a quick update, requiring just a couple of minutes to download the update and then a quick restart for the install process.

Once the Rapid Security Response update is installed, iOS 16.2 users will see an updated version of iOS 16.2 (b), and tapping on the version in the About section of Settings will display information about the installed iOS version and the Rapid Security Response update. Those who want to disable Rapid Security Response updates can do so by following our how to.

Article Link: Apple Releases Another Rapid Security Response Update for iOS 16.2 Beta Users
remember… with Android phones… some models get monthly security updates, others quartery, some 2x year, and some brands cut out security updates after a year…
 

Bawstun

macrumors 68020
Jun 25, 2009
2,276
2,807
All I care about is that the CRAZY keyboard lag since even iOS 15, seems to be gone in these last 2 betas. But it was like this previously too and in future betas returned to the same laggy piece of trash. The keyboard “character previews” or whatever are like lightning now, no lag and it can totally keep up with the pace of my typing and I am back to being at LEAST 3x faster.
 

ViDeOmAnCiNi

macrumors member
Sep 15, 2016
79
166
AZ
I wish they were more dynamic and did not require a restart. Just like MS said back in 1995 that Windows 95 would only require a reboot for two types of updates. Turns out those two scenarios were if the OS were installed and if the power was on, LOL.
 
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