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macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
55,004
17,380



234902-idvd_icon.jpg


Apple today released iDVD 7.1.1, bringing a minor update to the component of Apple's iLife suite dedicated to burning DVDs.
This update improves overall stability and ensures compatibility when sending slideshows from iPhoto '11 to iDVD.

This update is recommended for all users of iDVD 7.
The update weighs in at 34.53 MB and requires Mac OS X 10.6.6 or later.

iDVD has not seen a substantial update since the release of iDVD 7 as part of the iLife '08 suite released in August 2007, and its potential demise has been the subject of a number of rumors. The application continues to be offered, however, as part of the iLife '11 suite launched late last year.

Article Link: Apple Releases iDVD 7.1.1
 

pondosinatra

macrumors 6502
Jun 9, 2009
425
37
Calgary, Canada
Who needs DVD's when you can just buy your movies off iTunes....when your AppleTV craps out or your Mac crashes you can just buy them again. When your friend wants to borrow a movie you can tell them to just buy it off iTunes.

Who needs rackmount servers when you can just turn a Mac pro on it's side? For that matter who needs OS X Server when you can just use Windows 2008?

For that matter who needs Macs when you have the iPad? Who needs to do desktop publishing or video editing when you can play angry birds on your iPhone?
 

notjustjay

macrumors 603
Sep 19, 2003
6,055
162
Canada, eh?
Who needs DVD's when you can just buy your movies off iTunes....when your AppleTV craps out or your Mac crashes you can just buy them again. When your friend wants to borrow a movie you can tell them to just buy it off iTunes.

Yeah, I'm a little disappointed by how quickly Apple seems to be dismissing DVD media creation. The ability to quickly make a slick-looking DVD with iDVD was one of the key features that brought me to switch to a Mac in the first place back in 2003. In that time, people have come to think that I am a tech wizard because I can make nice slideshows and video DVDs using the iLife tools. I'd hate to see iDVD get discontinued.

Despite the proliferation of HD media and online streaming, the best way to quickly send videos or slide shows to people is still to burn them a DVD. Not everyone has a Blu-Ray player yet (nor, of course, is this supported on the Mac).
 

foiden

macrumors 6502a
Dec 13, 2008
809
13
Yep. It's all about sharing DVD features with family. More people have DVD players than people even have computers. To play it on the big screen, many folks in the family only have DVDs as the option. And since a big use of iLife is sharing family experiences, I can't see them removing that feature for a while. That is, until all the households have devices like Apple TV which can quickly and freely watch online content like Youtube, etc.
 

JoshBoy

macrumors 6502
Oct 12, 2008
480
334
Sydney, Australia
Sorry people but physical media is dying or dead. I was one of those people complaining about no support here or there but then I started to think about it, I jumped in my car and looked at my empty cd stacker - there is other optins people, better, faster cheaper options. All my DVD's (over 1000 of them) take up room, I wish they were all digital. The only media i buy now in physical form in bluray, besides that its digital all the way!!!

For those that are really complaining go get Adobe Encore
 

Erwin-Br

macrumors 6502a
Feb 6, 2008
595
20
The Netherlands
Yeah, who needs physical CD's, DVD's and books? All they do is take up space.

In a few years we can all live in empty rooms the size of shoeboxes because all we'll need is an iPad to listen to music, watch movies and read books. Our walls will be empty. No book cases. No video/audio cabinet. Imagine how much room we'll save! :D
 

Digitalclips

macrumors 65816
Mar 16, 2006
1,468
31
Sarasota, Florida
Yeah, I'm a little disappointed by how quickly Apple seems to be dismissing DVD media creation. The ability to quickly make a slick-looking DVD with iDVD was one of the key features that brought me to switch to a Mac in the first place back in 2003. In that time, people have come to think that I am a tech wizard because I can make nice slideshows and video DVDs using the iLife tools. I'd hate to see iDVD get discontinued.

Despite the proliferation of HD media and online streaming, the best way to quickly send videos or slide shows to people is still to burn them a DVD. Not everyone has a Blu-Ray player yet (nor, of course, is this supported on the Mac).

Was this an accidental post from 2001? Ever heard of YouTube?
 

notjustjay

macrumors 603
Sep 19, 2003
6,055
162
Canada, eh?
Was this an accidental post from 2001? Ever heard of YouTube?

I have some stuff on my YouTube channel, but sometimes you want to share things with people that you don't care to put online for potentially the whole world to see. There's also the issue of permanence and content ownership: YouTube can decide to pull your video anytime if they decide it violates guidelines, if it uses music they don't want you using, or for any other reason including server failure or data loss. People can't watch your video if they have slow (or no) internet connection.

What about people who do this stuff for a living? If I'm a videographer and I've just shot you a beautiful video of your wedding, do you want me to stick it on YouTube so you can share it with your friends? Classy.

Also, I'd like to see you try to explain to my mother how to get a YouTube video playing from her computer to her family room TV.

Yes, I agree that we're heading towards a disc-free, all-cloud-based world, but we're not there yet!
 

theelysium

Suspended
Nov 18, 2008
562
360
Arg

Please, don't ever get rid of this app! It's one of the best DVD creators ever. Users will always have a need to put media into a physical form factor!

I don't mind them waiting to do a major update every 3 - 4 releases. All it really needs is compatibility with the newer versions of the other iLife apps and a few themes here and there. In fact if this is the last version forever I'd be totally fine with that.
 
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TheZA

macrumors regular
Sep 14, 2007
174
0
I have some stuff on my YouTube channel, but sometimes you want to share things with people that you don't care to put online for potentially the whole world to see. There's also the issue of permanence and content ownership: YouTube can decide to pull your video anytime if they decide it violates guidelines, if it uses music they don't want you using, or for any other reason including server failure or data loss. People can't watch your video if they have slow (or no) internet connection.

What about people who do this stuff for a living? If I'm a videographer and I've just shot you a beautiful video of your wedding, do you want me to stick it on YouTube so you can share it with your friends? Classy.

Also, I'd like to see you try to explain to my mother how to get a YouTube video playing from her computer to her family room TV.

Yes, I agree that we're heading towards a disc-free, all-cloud-based world, but we're not there yet!

I couldn't agree with you more. I've started producing these yearly review DVDs for the grandparents with photos and video of the kids and family members. My in-laws told me that gathering around and watching it was the highlight of their Christmas this year. I did it all with iLife - actually, mostly iMovie HD! They aren't Facebook, they probably don't know what YouTube is, and certainly connecting the computer to their TV is like way beyong them.
 

theelysium

Suspended
Nov 18, 2008
562
360
Agree

I just restored old family movies from VHS to DVD. Its for grand parents and their children generations that don't get the concept of the "cloud". I would not have been able to restore their old VHS to YouTube or Mobile Me. If they could figure out how to watch it they certainly would't understand how to download or share that media with others from the cloud. :confused:
 

LimeiBook86

macrumors 604
May 4, 2002
7,996
17
Go Vegan
While I'm glad Apple updated iDVD for iLife '09 users as well (finally, makes sense since there was nothing new added) I'm still upset about the bugs and glitches in iDVD though. I love using this program to make DVDs of home videos from either VHS tapes or even 8mm film. It's simple to use, it's easy to configure, and it gives a great presentation. Other programs can't compare, especially when you consider how simple it is to make a DVD from an iMovie project.

However as I've mentioned before iDVD is broken. Some older menus or themes don't let you edit simple things like text - at all! So if iMovie named my chapters 1, 2, 3, 4. I can't change them to 'Chapter 1, 'Chapter 2', 'Start', 'End', etc. A fix is to just switch to a theme and then edit the titles and switch back, but in this process you lose your preview style, your layout, your colors, and all other personal customizations you've made. You can use some QuickTime plug-ins and scripts to edit the chapters or create new titles, but still this is a large pain for something simple that should "just work".

Another thing that iMovie needs is a template feature. I've burned over a dozen VHS home videos to DVD. I like using a certain menu theme with certain colors, music and fonts, it would be great just to remove the main video file and replace it with a new one. In theory this should work (maybe), but when I delete the main movie iDVD just hangs and crashes. I'd vow to never use iDVD again, but it's hard to replace.

DVDs are still great for sending to family and friends. Not everyone's Grandma or cousins have a high-speed internet connection available to them, or know how to use a computer. DVD players have been everywhere for the past 10 years or so, computers, cars, video game systems and even TVs have them built-in. So there's still a market for burning videos onto DVD. Maybe when Apple finally adopts Blu-Ray drives in their Macs we'll have a DVD/Blu-Ray creator built into iMovie. But until then I hope iDVD is here to stay (and gets updated again)... some of us still use it quite frequently. It would be a shame to let it go to waste.

Products like Toast or Adobe Encore offer DVD creation too, but I've found their menus are either too simple and plain, or too complicated and stylized. I want to simply be able to create a DVD from iMovie without worrying about complicated details or loose ends. I hear the DVD Studio app in Final Cut is nice (and complex) too bad I can't afford to try that out, would be nice to give it a try.

I just restored old family movies from VHS to DVD. Its for grand parents and their children generations that don't get the concept of the "cloud". I would not have been able to restore their old VHS to YouTube or Mobile Me. If they could figure out how to watch it they certainly would't understand how to download or share that media with others from the cloud. :confused:

This is a good point. I've been doing the same, I've converted dozens of VHS home video tapes to DVDs and it's perfect for sharing with grandparents and others. You put the disc in and press play, it's pretty simple. MobileMe & YouTube are great options, but for someone without a computer or the internet it's not an option. A DVD is still very handy and easily played in many devices.
 
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sportsfan

macrumors regular
Nov 13, 2009
211
68
Sorry people but physical media is dying or dead. I was one of those people complaining about no support here or there but then I started to think about it, I jumped in my car and looked at my empty cd stacker - there is other optins people, better, faster cheaper options. All my DVD's (over 1000 of them) take up room, I wish they were all digital. The only media i buy now in physical form in bluray, besides that its digital all the way!!!

For those that are really complaining go get Adobe Encore

Wish I had 20+ grand to drop on DVD's....
 

notjustjay

macrumors 603
Sep 19, 2003
6,055
162
Canada, eh?
Wish I had 20+ grand to drop on DVD's....

What are you suggesting, that he's lying? Or stupid for not stealing the movies instead of buying them? Or simply rich?

One nice thing about physical media is you can buy them secondhand or on sale. You can pick them up dirt cheap at flea markets and Salvation Army stores, or someone might even give you a stack and say "here, take 'em".

You can't do that with streaming video or iTunes movies.

I don't have 1,000 DVDs but I easily have 200-300, and that's just the collection I have today -- I constantly prune the collection, giving away or selling old movies I no longer care to watch. Many of them were acquired from Blockbuster "previously viewed" or from the $5 bin at Wal-Mart.

Lately I've been buying Blu-Rays and many of those come with Digital Copies, which I've been storing on a NAS. I'll need to set up an iTunes Home Sharing server if I want to be able to play those movies around my network. I enjoy digital streaming wherever I can get it, but for now, physical media still has its purposes.
 

LimeiBook86

macrumors 604
May 4, 2002
7,996
17
Go Vegan
What are you suggesting, that he's lying? Or stupid for not stealing the movies instead of buying them? Or simply rich?

One nice thing about physical media is you can buy them secondhand or on sale. You can pick them up dirt cheap at flea markets and Salvation Army stores, or someone might even give you a stack and say "here, take 'em".

You can't do that with streaming video or iTunes movies.

I don't have 1,000 DVDs but I easily have 200-300, and that's just the collection I have today -- I constantly prune the collection, giving away or selling old movies I no longer care to watch. Many of them were acquired from Blockbuster "previously viewed" or from the $5 bin at Wal-Mart.

Lately I've been buying Blu-Rays and many of those come with Digital Copies, which I've been storing on a NAS. I'll need to set up an iTunes Home Sharing server if I want to be able to play those movies around my network. I enjoy digital streaming wherever I can get it, but for now, physical media still has its purposes.

I agree with you 100%. DVDs can be had cheaply and you can get them almost anywhere. I buy some used too, and it makes it even sweeter. I also enjoy streaming as well, but it's good to have a hard physical copy when you just want to put it in a player and watch it without worrying about a thing. Both media formats have their advantages, but I don't think DVDs are going anywhere for a while. Even though I do love my Blu-Rays very much. :D
 

Micjose

macrumors member
Sep 4, 2009
87
0
Portland, OR
Yeah, who needs physical CD's, DVD's and books? All they do is take up space.

In a few years we can all live in empty rooms the size of shoeboxes because all we'll need is an iPad to listen to music, watch movies and read books. Our walls will be empty. No book cases. No video/audio cabinet. Imagine how much room we'll save! :D

LOL, Exactly my thought...
 

bam bam

macrumors newbie
Sep 27, 2007
16
0
Chicago area
Yep. It's all about sharing DVD features with family. More people have DVD players than people even have computers. To play it on the big screen, many folks in the family only have DVDs as the option. And since a big use of iLife is sharing family experiences, I can't see them removing that feature for a while. That is, until all the households have devices like Apple TV which can quickly and freely watch online content like Youtube, etc.

Bingo!!!

I don't understand all the hate for DVDs and iDVD. It's the only way to share home movies with the grandparents and other relatives. My house if fairly cutting edge in terms of techie stuff but the rest of my extended family is not at all. "TiVo, AppleTV, YouTube - -what's that??" Yes I have to spend way more time burning DVDs, but it gives me an extra physical back up.

I have 60+ hours of family footage (spanning 7+ years of my kids) and all the DVDs fit in one shoebox. How much smaller of a footprint do you need??

I will greatly miss iDVD if/when it goes away.
 
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