Become a MacRumors Supporter for $25/year with no ads, private forums, and more!

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
54,695
16,883


Apple today reminded developers that its App Tracking Transparency rules will be enforced starting with the launch of iOS 14.5, iPadOS 14.5, and tvOS 14.5.

nba-tracking-prompt.jpg

When these updates are released, developers will need to get express permission to access the IDFA or advertising identifier on a device to track users across apps and websites for ad targeting purposes.
Make sure your apps are ready for iOS 14.5, iPadOS 14.5, and tvOS 14.5. With the upcoming public release, all apps must use the AppTrackingTransparency framework to request the user's permission to track them or to access their device's advertising identifier. Unless you receive permission from the user to enable tracking, the device's advertising identifier value will be all zeros and you may not track them.

When submitting your app for review, any other form of tracking -- for example, by name or email address -- must be declared in the product page's App Store Privacy Information section and be performed only if permission is granted through AppTrackingTransparency. You'll also need to include a purpose string in the system prompt to explain why you'd like to track the user, per App Store Review Guideline 5.1.2(i). These requirements apply to all apps starting with the public release of iOS 14.5, iPadOS 14.5, and tvOS 14.5.

As a reminder, collecting device and usage data with the intent of deriving a unique representation of a user, or fingerprinting, continues to be a violation of the Apple Developer Program License Agreement.
Apple clarifies that developers are not allowed to use specific device data with the intent of fingerprinting a user to replace the IDFA, which is something that Chinese app developers and mobile measurement companies have already been doing.

Apple earlier in March warned app developers not to use alternate methods to collect user data for tracking purposes, and last week, rejected several app updates from developers using an SDK from mobile measurement company Adjust, which used data like software version and charge level to keep track of users.

All of the framework for App Tracking Transparency is already in place and some developers have already begun asking users for IDFA access permission, but it will be a requirement for all apps that use the IDFA when iOS 14.5 and its sister updates are released.

We don't yet know when iOS 14.5 will see a release, but in an interview with Kara Swisher that came out this morning, Apple CEO Tim Cook said that iOS 14.5 will be coming in "just a few weeks."

Article Link: Apple Reminds Developers About Upcoming App Tracking Transparency Enforcement in iOS 14.5
 
  • Like
Reactions: RandomDSdevel

Rochy Bay

Suspended
Apr 5, 2016
271
118
Cupertino, CA
First question would be, how much would apple willing to apply double standard for their own apps?

Second question would be, how enforceable this requirement would be? Will big companies just slip through via some sort of special Consideration?
It depends on whether they can make money off the 30% cut or if they decide to launch a competing app of their own and destroy your business.
 

JosephAW

macrumors 601
May 14, 2012
4,237
5,124
It’s strange how they are warning developers but they are not warning the public yet about this upcoming update and which apps will cease working.

If I remember right Apple warned the public on the last iOS 10 dot update which apps need to be updated or replaced because they will no longer work in iOS 11. That leads me to believe we’ll see one more iteration of iOS 14.4.x warning the public.
 
  • Disagree
Reactions: LeadingHeat

subi257

macrumors 65816
Sep 13, 2018
1,012
997
New Jersey
Let’s see how quickly Apple flip flops on this rule if Epic wins the anti-trust trial. This is a rule that could only exist without competitors, as many developers would clearly leave the App Store on this basis alone for that sweet ad revenue.
Okay, so they leave the app store. Then where do they go, just Android? If Epic wins the suit, then does Apple just reinvent the app store to be something different? Maybe, app gets submitted for testing...but Apple does not host them anymore? I think that is a lot of room for changes and iterations it Apple loses.
 

subi257

macrumors 65816
Sep 13, 2018
1,012
997
New Jersey
The unannounced hardware is Apple’s latest attempt to destroy competitors. Tile in this case. Where is the innovation?!
That make no logical sense? so one company makes a product, now anybody else makes the same type of product it's an attempt to destroy their competitors? So GM makes a car and then Toyota makes one..that's an attempt to destroy GM? They are both cars....locator beacons, so, you make one, I make one, that's competition....with the idea of capturing all of the business or sales that I can and taking them for the competitors.
 

The_Gream

macrumors regular
Jul 16, 2020
106
197
It’s strange how they are warning developers but they are not warning the public yet about this upcoming update and which apps will cease working.

If I remember right Apple warned the public on the last iOS 10 dot update which apps need to be updated or replaced because they will no longer work in iOS 11. That leads me to believe we’ll see one more iteration of iOS 14.4.x warning the public.
There is no need to tell customers - as the Apps will not stop functioning. It’s isn’t a change from 32bit to 64bit. It is a prompt for a feature that is already in the OS, just at the time Apps don’t have to ask to track they just do.
 

dannyyankou

macrumors G4
Mar 2, 2012
10,832
21,617
Westchester, NY
Let’s see how quickly Apple flip flops on this rule if Epic wins the anti-trust trial. This is a rule that could only exist without competitors, as many developers would clearly leave the App Store on this basis alone for that sweet ad revenue.
I’d rather stay on the iPhone and have 95% of the apps vanish than sell my soul in order to use a specific app.
 

LiquidJay

macrumors member
Aug 28, 2020
53
145
First question would be, how much would apple willing to apply double standard for their own apps?

Second question would be, how enforceable this requirement would be? Will big companies just slip through via some sort of special Consideration?
Apple is very clear about their own apps. Guessing a warning first or maybe no new updates ... and then finally removal. I wouldn't wanna be on the other side of that.
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.