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Apple is speeding up development of a smart ring that can be worn on the finger to track users' health biometrics, claims a new report coming out of Korea.

samsung-galaxy-ring.jpg
Teaser image of Samsung Galaxy Ring shown at Galaxy Unpacked in January

Apple has toyed with the idea of a ring wearable for several years, as indicated by several patents, but with Samsung preparing to bring its own product to market, the time could be ripe for Apple to follow it with something that embodies CEO Tim Cook's mantra, "be best, not first."

According to the Electronic Times, Apple has been paying close attention to the market for signs that a smart ring would be a popular, less intrusive alternative to a watch, that can be worn for longer and is easier to sleep with.

Apple is said to be seriously weighing up the idea as a viable expansion of its wearables lineup, and has been increasingly applying for patents related to an NFC-enabled finger-worn device as it coordinates the timing of the release.

"It seems likely that commercialization is imminent," said an industry insider quoted in the machine-translated report.

The rumor comes as Samsung prepares to unveil a Galaxy Ring at its second Galaxy Unpacked 2024 event, which is likely to take place in the second half of July. The Korean firm teased the product's existence at the end of its first Unpacked event in January, and it is now expected to enter mass production in the second half of the year.

Besides its rumored ability to measure blood flow, the Galaxy Ring is also expected to feature ECG monitoring, sleep tracking, and functionalities for controlling other devices and making wireless payments remotely. The device is expected to come in several sizes.

The emerging smart ring category is currently led by Oura Ring, first released by Finnish health technology company Oura back in 2015. The device collects activity, heart rate, respiratory rate, and sleep data, and transmits it via Bluetooth to the Oura app. Now in its third-generation, the device can also measure body temperature and menstrual cycle, and the battery is said to last for a week on a single charge.

In March 2022, Oura announced that it had sold more than one million rings, but its latest incarnation has come in for criticism after the company introduced a $5.99 monthly subscription fee that put certain aspects of user data behind a paywall.

Would you be interested in an "Apple Ring" as an alternative to Apple Watch? Let us know in the comments.

Article Link: 'Apple Ring' Allegedly in Development to Rival Samsung Galaxy Ring
 
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Pezimak

macrumors 68030
May 1, 2021
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I find these rings pointless, cost as much as a smart watch, try to sell them on the premises of luxury metals, yet with a minuscule battery that will die after 2 or 3 years, but I guess you can wear it as a piece of jewellery then. Still not impressed if Apple just copies the market here.
 

arkitect

macrumors 604
Sep 5, 2005
7,067
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Bath, United Kingdom
Would love such a ring. I prefer wearing classic watches
Absolutely!
I'd definitely wear an Apple ring and ditch my Apple watch Ultra2 to go back to vintage watches.

I have a Ultrahuman Air... works well, but would love to eliminate the app and have the ring data in the fitness & health app. Also... payments would be the killer app
👍 Agree.
 

TJ82

macrumors 65816
Mar 8, 2012
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For a lot of users who prefer Garmin as a 'proper' sports watch a ring makes a lot of sense to wear alongside it for sleep and general health tracking (as long as that data is also available to Garmin Connect).

Garmin's analytics are superior (due to the Firstbeat acquisition) but very few people actually like to sleep with a bulky Garmin watch which means that the analytics are incomplete - this makes things like training readiness scores a lot of nonsense as the data just isn't there.

Whoop and Oura are just too pricey for most though the form factors for 24/7 wear are the best around.

Apple could also integrate some ecosystem functionality which would totally kill Oura as an option for Apple users.

Personally think an Apple ring is a buy as long as the data can be used by Garmin too, though I'd prefer a band like Whoop, though even smaller again.

Garmin should really sell a band or ring alongside their Fenix and Forerunner watches to capture sleep data.
 

ProfessionalFan

macrumors 603
Sep 29, 2016
5,829
14,784
Nah... Hate rings. Uncomfortable and annoying. Plus My grandad had his finger ripped off when a ring was caught in a workshop tool. 🤮
Wow that is a horrible freak accident. Thankfully rare I am sure. I don’t usually wear rings because i am afraid of my fingers being swollen for whatever reason and it getting stuck. I would be tempted by this ring though.
 

Marbles1

macrumors 6502a
Nov 27, 2011
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I have a Ultrahuman Air... works well, but would love to eliminate the app and have the ring data in the fitness & health app. Also... payments would be the killer app

Completely agree re: killer app.

A ring is something you just wear all the time and don't think about. It's just ideal for payments and for unlocking your phone, or laptop. Far superior to a watch.

And then you've got all the health tracking stuff for sleep, steps etc.
 
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Makosuke

macrumors 604
Aug 15, 2001
6,662
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The Cool Part of CA, USA
Conceptually monitoring rings are neat, and I can certainly understand the appeal, but this is one I’ll sit out in favor of the watch.

Leaving aside watch display functions you can’t fit on a ring no matter how far the technology advances, I just don’t like wearing rings. I don’t even like wearing my wedding ring.

Sleep tracking is the one thing I could theoretically be convinced to wear something like this for, but I also don’t have any real interest in sleep tracking, so…
 
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