Apple Says it Has Created Over 2 Million U.S. Jobs Since iPhone Launched in 2007

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In a new article posted by The New York Times over the weekend, Apple's contributions to the United States workforce and economy are highlighted with a focus on the company's campus in Austin, Texas. Some of its 6,000 employees there (grown from 2,100 seven years ago) were interviewed, providing a glimpse into the employment lifestyle Apple offers its staff members.

The central occupation of the workers in Austin is customer tech support, but there's also employees who manage Apple's network of suppliers, run iTunes and the App Store, update Maps, and keep tabs on Apple's finances. The average income for a call center worker at the Austin campus is $30,000 a year, but following the completion of a one-year contract many become permanent employees and earn $45,000 per year, "plus generous benefits and small annual stock grants."


According to Apple, factoring in senior management staff, the average salary of its Austin staff is $77,000 a year. Although the company didn't tell The New York Times any of its future expansion plans for the U.S., it reiterated on its contributions to the country's workforce, with the iPhone as a launch pad for its employment boost.
"Apple has created over two million jobs in the United States since the introduction of the iPhone nine years ago, including explosive growth in iOS developers, thousands of new supplier and manufacturing partners, and a 400 percent increase in our employee teams," the company said in a statement. "We made the unique decision to keep and expand our contact centers for customers in the Americas in the United States, and Austin is home to many of those employees. We plan to continue to invest and grow across the U.S."
In the call center, the entry-level positions open up major possibilities for quality workers later on. One worker, Genny Lopez, began as a basic contractor answering customer calls, and is now on staff fielding and troubleshooting more difficult problems. "You don't need a crazy technical background to do this job," Lopez said. "A lot of the training is getting really good at talking to people."

In Austin, Apple is also said to encourage employees to test out other team environments, "to allow workers to try a completely different role for six months to see if it suits them and the company." The New York Times met with Brisa Carillo, who was one of the test pilots for the team-switching idea, and found out that she began work at Apple in its call center right after college, but now handles the company's international payroll while she studies for her M.B.A. to continue to move up the ranks of Apple's finance department. A formal program backing the progressive idea is on track to be instituted soon.

Image via The New York Times

Apple prides itself on providing top-notch phone service in 26 languages -- 12 are spoken at the Texas call center alone -- and the people who handle the calls are expected to follow up on any problem that cannot be quickly resolved. During the recent visit, Stephanie Dumareille, a senior adviser on iOS issues who is fluent in English and Spanish, patiently answered questions from a customer who was worried about saving her résumé online and did not know whether she was using a Windows or a Mac computer.
Much of The New York Times' article is a response to critics, including President-elect Donald Trump, who believe Apple should move its manufacturing plants into the United States to improve its contribution to jobs within the country. A report from last week claimed that Apple asked both Foxconn and Pegatron to look into making iPhones stateside, a request which Foxconn is allegedly studying closely.

Apple's investment in and nurturing of its employees makes up for its lack of product manufacturing stateside, according to Lopez, who said that at the Austin campus "the product that Apple builds here is us."

Check out the full story by The New York Times here.

Article Link: Apple Says it Has Created Over 2 Million U.S. Jobs Since iPhone Launched in 2007
 

levitynyc

macrumors 65816
Aug 19, 2006
1,100
3,235
Most of them selling crappy accessories and repair services.

Let's also not forget the developers that just rip off IPs trying to make a buck.

How about putting some of those of billions in untaxed cash back in circulation?
[doublepost=1479735069][/doublepost]Also, call center work is hell on earth.

I used to recruit for them. It's awful. People hate it and quit before lunch on their first day.
 

djcerla

macrumors 68000
Apr 23, 2015
1,829
7,653
Italy
Most of them selling crappy accessories and repair services.

Let's also not forget the developers that just rip off IPs trying to make a buck.

Also, call center work is hell on earth.

I used to recruit for them. It's awful. People hate it and quit before lunch on their first day.
Yeah. No job at all is a much better condition.

How about putting some of those of billions in untaxed cash back in circulation?
the fact that Apple is the largest tax payer in the world may be completely unrelated.
 

cdmoore74

macrumors 68020
Jun 24, 2010
2,413
711
I'm being laid off in 2 weeks and the last place I would work for is Apple. The only thing keeping Apple alive right now is the iPhone and I'm not willing to bet my future on a phone. Seeing how Apple is letting Mac's and iPad's suffer it's just a matter of time for the iPhone to fall. I just don't have faith in Apple (Tim Cook) inventing anything on the same level as Steve Jobs. Shame really but it's hard to replace someone that has vision.
 

dannyyankou

macrumors G3
Mar 2, 2012
9,433
16,364
Westchester, NY
Most of them selling crappy accessories and repair services.

Let's also not forget the developers that just rip off IPs trying to make a buck.

How about putting some of those of billions in untaxed cash back in circulation?
[doublepost=1479735069][/doublepost]Also, call center work is hell on earth.

I used to recruit for them. It's awful. People hate it and quit before lunch on their first day.
What do you want them to do, hire a bunch of rocket scientists and astro physicists?
 
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julesme

macrumors 6502
Oct 14, 2016
279
832
San Jose
Apple manufactures exactly ZERO percent of its iPhones in the United States. As a result, it has created millions of jobs in China over the last decade, helping nurture and grow a middle class of workers and managers who have profited enormously from American ideas and ingenuity while the US middle class has continued to shrink as a percentage of the whole. They should bring back some manufacturing jobs stateside (even 5 percent would be significant).
 

jerry16

macrumors regular
Sep 12, 2016
236
1,875
across the universe
Most of them selling crappy accessories and repair services.

Let's also not forget the developers that just rip off IPs trying to make a buck.

How about putting some of those of billions in untaxed cash back in circulation?
[doublepost=1479735069][/doublepost]Also, call center work is hell on earth.

I used to recruit for them. It's awful. People hate it and quit before lunch on their first day.
How many jobs have you created?
 

69Mustang

macrumors 604
Jan 7, 2014
7,461
14,021
In between a rock and a hard place
Yeah. No job at all is a much better condition.
Agreed. A job is a job is a job. It's an opportunity, and according to the article, it's a stepping stone to other possibilities. Not sure how someone could find fault with it.


the fact that Apple is the largest tax payer in the world may be completely unrelated.
Agree again. It is completed unrelated. I just wish people would stop using that "largest tax payer in the world" snipet for anything... at all. It's deflective and deceptive and a perfect example of corporate speak that makes me want to punch a kitten. No one should ever parrot this drivel as if it has any meaning beyond an attempt to side step an issue. /rant over
 

2457282

Suspended
Dec 6, 2012
3,327
3,014
The operative word is "since." How many jobs are out there right now in the US because of Apple? Certainly those employed at their offices and stores in the US amount to thousands, but I doubt there are 2 million Apple employees in the US right now. You could argue that the eco-system creates additional jobs for developers and third party accessories, but I am not sure how many are actually in the US.
 

5684697

Suspended
Sep 22, 2007
237
907
Agreed. A job is a job is a job. It's an opportunity, and according to the article, it's a stepping stone to other possibilities. Not sure how someone could find fault with it.



Agree again. It is completed unrelated. I just wish people would stop using that "largest tax payer in the world" snipet for anything... at all. It's deflective and deceptive and a perfect example of corporate speak that makes me want to punch a kitten. No one should ever parrot this drivel as if it has any meaning beyond an attempt to side step an issue. /rant over
Don't hit any kittens.
 

ThunderSkunk

macrumors 68030
Dec 31, 2007
2,997
2,575
Milwaukee Area
How many jobs have you created?
43. In reality, 0. Consumer demand has created all 43. Those jobs "I" created, serve my company and its interests, they're not charity positions we created as gifts to the world. Those positions do not negate the cost of society's services we require and utilize, which are more, lot less than the average citizen, and should not exempt us from paying for them.

If I can't run a profitable business without the government dumping our costs on the rest of the taxpayers, then I should not be in business.

Same goes for Appl, Walmart, Google, Exxon, Target, etc.
 

paul4339

macrumors 65816
Sep 14, 2009
1,404
666
Most of them selling crappy accessories and repair services.

Let's also not forget the developers that just rip off IPs trying to make a buck.

How about putting some of those of billions in untaxed cash back in circulation?
[doublepost=1479735069][/doublepost]Also, call center work is hell on earth.

I used to recruit for them. It's awful. People hate it and quit before lunch on their first day.
$30K avg in a call center isn't so bad... it's still a job. If we keep complaining about $30K call center jobs what company would want to do business in the US?

And the political noise to 'make' companies move jobs from China to the US... What kind of job are those?

.
 

now i see it

macrumors 603
Jan 2, 2002
5,544
11,316
"Created" is open to interpretation.

How about "stole" from Nokia and Blackberry.
Or if "stole" is too harsh a word, then "shifted" may more accurately describe what has happened.
 

Pootmatoot

macrumors 6502a
Nov 17, 2014
614
1,244
haha. As if Apple is teetering on bankruptcy.
It has record massive cash reserves, it's nowhere near bankruptcy.

It is very close to a likely stock crash though: it has one hell of a lot balanced on the continuing success of a single product.
 

ItsNotaTumor

macrumors regular
Sep 15, 2016
129
130
Apple manufactures exactly ZERO percent of its iPhones in the United States. As a result, it has created millions of jobs in China over the last decade, helping nurture and grow a middle class of workers and managers who have profited enormously from American ideas and ingenuity while the US middle class has continued to shrink as a percentage of the whole. They should bring back some manufacturing jobs stateside (even 5 percent would be significant).
... "millions of jobs in China" were created because of consumerism and the rise in technology use by the everyday individual. This is not exclusive to Apple. Every time Nintendo, Microsoft, Samsung, etc. release a device, it is because of China.

I have a brand name case for my iPhone that was manufactured 45 min from my house. That is some of the domestic impact Tim is speaking to.
 
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FactVsOpinion

macrumors 6502
Jul 27, 2012
307
452
It has record massive cash reserves, it's nowhere near bankruptcy.

It is very close to a likely stock crash though: it has one hell of a lot balanced on the continuing success of a single product.
About how many companies could we say the same thing, where most or all income comes from one product or service? Most.

At least the other facets of Apple could independently be Fortune 500 companies. And, even if the iPhone became less dominant, it won't simply vanish.

Let's not forget, the comment claimed that it was foolish to seek employment at Apple, due to its uncertain future. Compared to what? As if Apple stands out as a company whose failure is a near term certainty. That's ridiculous.
 

Pootmatoot

macrumors 6502a
Nov 17, 2014
614
1,244
About how many companies could we say the same thing, where most or all income comes from one product or service? Most..

On the same scale and niche as Apple? I can't think of any: look at Samsung and Amazon, both massively diversified businesses with their fingers in many pies. That's why Samsung survived the Note disaster. If that happened to Apple, the stock would tank.

Apple would be fine due to their massive cash reserves, but the pressure on the iPhone 9 would be the crunch time.

But yes, there's absolutely zero risk working for Apple. Just don't be a shareholder.
 

FactVsOpinion

macrumors 6502
Jul 27, 2012
307
452
On the same scale and niche as Apple? I can't think of any: look at Samsung and Amazon, both massively diversified businesses with their fingers in many pies. That's why Samsung survived the Note disaster. If that happened to Apple, the stock would tank.

Apple would be fine due to their massive cash reserves, but the pressure on the iPhone 9 would be the crunch time.

But yes, there's absolutely zero risk working for Apple. Just don't be a shareholder.
Glad we agree.

Google, by the way, is more like Apple and less like Amazon; in that it's revenue is almost entirely reliant on advertising. Advertising is less likely to suffer whims of fashion than a consumer product. But who knows what is in store.
 

Pootmatoot

macrumors 6502a
Nov 17, 2014
614
1,244
Glad we agree.

Google, by the way, is more like Apple and less like Amazon; in that it's revenue is almost entirely reliant on advertising. Advertising is less likely to suffer whims of fashion than a consumer product. But who knows what is in store.

I think Google is also quite fragile, but not quite so dangerously so as Apple. They have heavy investment in the secret backbones of the internet (much like Amazon does) which have a much more long-term outlook. Google could go the way of AskJeeves, but they've wisely been buying up technologies that could threaten them if they mature.

Apple on the other hand is vulnerable from multiple directions, because there are so many massive companies fighting in the same space: they can't just buy Samsung.

I worry about the Surface phone rumoured next year: yes, currently Windows phones have about 6 users, but look at how the Surface 4 has completely disrupted the Mac Air in universities amongst students. If they have some sort of combined phone/surface deal, they could do the same.
 
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