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dk001

macrumors demi-god
Oct 3, 2014
10,465
14,755
Sage, Lightning, and Mountains
I think you're confusing two separate situations.

It is completely your choice to give up your privacy voluntarily to these companies for services rendered. You're an adult, you can enter into a legally binding contract and do whatever you want with your information including put it on a billboard for all to see or bury it in your yard in a lockbox, and then put a patio over it, or any use between those two extremes. ...

There is a difference between voluntary and a hidden ability that allows hidden information gathering / sharing that is unknown to the user.
 
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Sill

macrumors 6502a
Nov 14, 2014
879
563
The NYTimes? ( I have a subscription via work ). o_O
Have to do a bit more digging if I feel like it.
But the NYT - I always always always treat any article they publish like it is a modified half truth with an agenda unless I can prove to myself it isn't.

So very, very, very true. I gave them a bit more latitude on this one because it must have really pained them to admit what that article said.
 
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ivoruest

macrumors 6502
Jul 12, 2010
398
28
Guatemala
LOL! The one place you can be sure that you're not being watched is with TouchID! No apps have access to the fingerprints stored on your iPhone. Read up on Secure Enclave.

I don't believe everything that I read. But who cares anyway. We're all being watched all of the time... jajaja sorry, I guess I'm getting too controversial. jajaja
 
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cwt1nospam

macrumors 6502a
Oct 6, 2006
564
129
I don't believe everything that I read. But who cares anyway. We're all being watched all of the time...
Maybe, ... if you believe any of the things you read ... you can post a link showing that some app (or other method) can gain direct access to the fingerprints stored on an iPhone. Or maybe you can show how to do it? That would make you famous!
 

MacBH928

macrumors G3
May 17, 2008
8,238
3,673
They can't monitor 300m Americans or the world population. Thats insane. If they have info on a terrorist they should get a "search warrant" to spy on him, not look into people's private lives.
 
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freediverx

macrumors 65816
Feb 19, 2006
1,009
1,022
I don't understand the issue.
Tim Cook has publicly said Apple don't collect any info, it's simply not there to collect. They could not collect it even if they wanted to, due to the way they have designed their system.
So it's a non issue, the government cannot get access to anything stored or said on Apple mobile devices can they?

If what Tim has publicly stated is indeed true.
Or are we now saying that what Tim said to us buying public is actually not true, and if requested Apple can/will supply the data?

What you type, Say, Store on your iPhone is either Private and unobtainable as Tim has stated, or it's not.
You can't have it both ways.


Apple handles a variety of user data. Different types of data are stored and protected in different ways, at times for reasons beyond Apple's control. Some of that data (for example email) has very little protection because the underlying technology is inherently not secure. To demand that Apple make email secure would be like demanding that the Post Office figure out how to make post cards secure. It's impossible because it was never designed to be secure. There's not much Apple can do about that other than encourage its users to use better and more secure technologies instead.

If I understand correctly, anything stored in the cloud using your Apple ID login could be accessed by Apple (iCloud Photo Library, for example?). So Apple could be ordered by a court to make this data available to law enforcement on a case by case basis. But Apple, unlike some other companies, will not provide access to this type of data just for the asking, without a court order.

Then there's data that may be stored only on your device, like an iPhone (for example photos, if you have cloud photo services disabled, and also Messages data). Apple have made secure encryption standard on iOS devices for quite some time now and, depending on your settings and the quality of your password, it may be impossible for even Apple to access this data - which was Apple's intention. The DOJ wants Apple to eliminate this option and to ensure everything stored on its devices is accessible to law enforcement, which Apple is unwilling to do for what should be obvious reasons.
 

dk001

macrumors demi-god
Oct 3, 2014
10,465
14,755
Sage, Lightning, and Mountains
Apple handles a variety of user data. Different types of data are stored and protected in different ways, at times for reasons beyond Apple's control. Some of that data (for example email) has very little protection because the underlying technology is inherently not secure. To demand that Apple make email secure would be like demanding that the Post Office figure out how to make post cards secure. It's impossible because it was never designed to be secure. There's not much Apple can do about that other than encourage its users to use better and more secure technologies instead.

If I understand correctly, anything stored in the cloud using your Apple ID login could be accessed by Apple (iCloud Photo Library, for example?). So Apple could be ordered by a court to make this data available to law enforcement on a case by case basis. But Apple, unlike some other companies, will not provide access to this type of data just for the asking, without a court order.

Then there's data that may be stored only on your device, like an iPhone (for example photos, if you have cloud photo services disabled, and also Messages data). Apple have made secure encryption standard on iOS devices for quite some time now and, depending on your settings and the quality of your password, it may be impossible for even Apple to access this data - which was Apple's intention. The DOJ wants Apple to eliminate this option and to ensure everything stored on its devices is accessible to law enforcement, which Apple is unwilling to do for what should be obvious reasons.

Far too often I have done a restore or set up as new then link my iCLoud to my device and get a surprise or two.
Emails, photos and/or contacts that I deleted are now back.
Emails, photos, and/or contacts I expected back are now AWOL.
GameCenter items that appear or vanish.

There is too much that occurs to say Apple doesn't have nor has access to user data.
 
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