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Apple's Canada division and Geekbench maker John Poole today testified before a House of Commons committee on industry, science, and technology in Canada to address the power management features Apple introduced in older iPhones in iOS 10.2.1, reports iMore.

Poole was on hand because back in late December, he used his Geekbench platform to confirm the link between degraded iPhone batteries in older iPhones and processor slowdowns, which Apple had not, at the time, clearly explained.

iphone-6s-battery.jpg

Apple Canada was there to answer questions and share facts about why Apple implemented the feature in the first place, a topic that's been previously covered in support documents and a letter to customers.

As part of Apple's testimony, Jacqueline Famulak, Apple Canada's Manager of Legal and Government Affairs, provided a lengthy statement that largely repeats prior statements Apple has offered in the United States.

Famulak reiterated that Apple would "never intentionally" shorten the life of an Apple product to drive customer upgrades, and she explained that Apple added power management features in iOS 10.2.1 to allow customers to continue to use iPhones with aging batteries. A portion of the statement shared by iMore:
First, Apple would never intentionally do anything to shorten the life of any Apple product or degrade the user experience in order to drive customer upgrades. Apple's entire philosophy and ethic is built around the goal of delivering cutting-edge devices that our customers love. Our motivation is always the user.

Second, Apple's actions related to performance of iPhones with older batteries were designed specifically to prevent some older models from unexpectedly shutting down under certain circumstances. And we communicated this publicly. Let me explain.

In order for a phone to function properly, the electronics must be able to draw power from the battery instantaneously. But, as lithium-ion batteries age, their ability to hold a charge diminishes, and their ability to provide power to the device decreases. Very cold temperatures can also negatively affect a battery's performance. A battery with a low state of charge may also cause the device to behave differently. These things are characteristics of battery chemistry that are common to lithium-ion batteries used in all smartphones, not just Apple's.

If power demands cannot be met, the iPhone is designed to shut down automatically in order to protect the device's electronics from low voltage.

We do not want our customers to experience interruptions in the use of their iPhones, whether that is making an emergency phone call, taking a picture, sharing a post, or watching the final minutes of a movie. To address the issue of unexpected shutdowns, we developed software that dynamically manages power usage when, and only when, an iPhone is facing the risk of an unexpected shutdown. This power management software helps keep iPhones on when they otherwise might turn off - it does this by balancing the demand for power with the available supply of power.

The sole purpose of the software update in this case was to help customers to continue to use older iPhones with aging batteries without shutdowns - not to drive them to buy newer devices.

Third, Apple regularly provides software updates for iPhone and our other devices. These software updates can include everything from new features, to bug fixes, to security updates. Whenever we issue a software update, we include a ReadMe note which has a description of the contents of the update for the customer to review prior to the software installation. In the case of iOS 10.2.1, we stated that it "improves power management during peak workloads to avoid unexpected shutdowns on iPhone."
Famulak went on to explain that Apple is offering $35 battery replacements in Canada, down from $99 ($29 in the U.S., down from $79) and that iOS 11.3, coming this spring, will offer customers more information about the health of their iPhone's battery and allow the power management features to be turned off.

The House of Commons is aiming to make sure Canadian consumers are being treated fairly by Apple, and it's possible that the Competition Bureau in Canada, also at today's committee meeting, will launch an investigation. Apple will also be facing government inquiries in other countries, including the United States.

The full text of the statement Apple provided to the House of Commons committee can be read over at iMore.

Article Link: Apple Testifies on iPhone Throttling Before Canadian Parliamentary Committee
 

meaning-matters

macrumors 6502a
Dec 13, 2013
529
2,236
"Apple would never intentionally do anything ... to drive customer upgrades."

What about the missing capacity option in iPhones???

Precisely the option that's best for most users is missing, driving people into upgrades either at purchase, or some time later.

For example now it's 64GB (too little) or 256GB (too much and very expensive), for many years.

I hate this, because I want to love and believe Apple.
 
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csurfr

macrumors 68020
Dec 7, 2016
2,310
1,748
Seattle, WA
I don't think Apple meant any harm. However, the way they handled the whole situation left a lot to be desired by a lot of people. Apple, through it's actions, has painted a bullseye on itself.

I see the fallout from this getting worse for Apple. Good public relations will only go so far.

I didn't realize it was in the ReadMe for 10.2.1. . . I guess I've grown accustomed to not glancing at them.

Would you like some popcorn? This thread is certainly going to get interesting.
 

Apple_Robert

Contributor
Sep 21, 2012
34,964
50,968
In the middle of several books.
I didn't realize it was in the ReadMe for 10.2.1. . . I guess I've grown accustomed to not glancing at them.

Would you like some popcorn? This thread is certainly going to get interesting.
I don't plan on camping out in the thread. lol. This subject has been hashed out numerous times on here already.

I might go play in traffic where there is always something new to look out for.
 
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Cndnmax

macrumors member
Oct 12, 2011
91
98
I think people are confusing the general drop in performance because of the latest ios11 update and the power management slow down. Everything has slowed down including a very annoying lag in messaging with the recent update. This is the problem, not the power management because that only kicks in when ur battery is down to like 15%. You can easily see this effect by FaceTiming someone and letting the battery drain. Once the power management slows down the phone you will notice ur video become very choppy and slow.
I don’t care about the power management slow down, fix the iOS update slow down.
 

BootsWalking

macrumors 68020
Feb 1, 2014
2,273
14,213
The sole purpose of the software update in this case was to help customers to continue to use older iPhones with aging batteries without shutdowns - not to drive them to buy newer devices.

Apple is still tiptoeing around the fact this problem is likely a design defect specific to iPhone 6/6+ and should have necessitated a recall of those models, and that the software change was their attempt to avoid that costly outcome. They keep using the "older phones" euphemism to conceal that fact.
 

cmwade77

macrumors 65816
Nov 18, 2008
1,071
1,200
Kind of odd how quickly this happened up here in Canada.
Not really, the U.S. legal system is painfully slow compared to most other countries, so we get used to these things dragging on forever. I wouldn't be at all surprised to see a verdict on this by the end of the month in Canada.

The issue that I think Apple is going to have is that there are people who took their phones in and were told that they need to buy new ones because the batteries weren't bad enough to replace, but had they replaced the battery it would have fixed the problem. This screams that Apple did this intentionally or that those working at Apple were trying to get more sales, either way it is going to be a problem for Apple, as many people replaced their phones when they didn't really need to or want to do so.
 

cmwade77

macrumors 65816
Nov 18, 2008
1,071
1,200
The sole purpose of the software update in this case was to help customers to continue to use older iPhones with aging batteries without shutdowns - not to drive them to buy newer devices.

Apple is still tiptoeing around the fact this problem is likely a design defect specific to iPhone 6/6+ and should have necessitated a recall of those models, and that the software change was their attempt to avoid that costly outcome. They keep using the "older phones" euphemism to conceal that fact.
Yeah, because if that was an issue, why would older Android phones that are out there not have this same problem?
 
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Brandhouse

macrumors 6502a
Aug 6, 2014
550
882
Apple's Canada division and Geekbench maker John Poole today testified before a House of Commons committee on industry, science, and technology in Canada to address the power management features Apple introduced in older iPhones in iOS 10.2.1, reports iMore.

What the hell has this got to do with any level of government in any country? It has nothing to do with anti-competiveness, nothing to do with a monopoly, nothing to do with foreign ownership laws or any other matter related legislation that a government as a norm falls under their power.
 
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JesperA

macrumors 6502a
Feb 10, 2012
691
1,079
Sweden
I have lived with a <80% iPhone 6 for about half a year now until i replaced the battery yesterday, i never realized how slow my phone was thanks to the safeguard implemented by Apple.

But seriously, my phone is 4 years old now and lithium batteries wear out, cant expect them to last forever, no-one should, my old battery had almost 1500 cycles during these 4 years and yesterday i extended my phones life for 2 years atleast (although i will upgrade to the next X in the fall) for 29 dollar, the cost of 3-4 pizzas so i really dont get what all the fuzz is about, battery replacement was cheap before too and Apple gave the phones extended lives through software to safeguard the phones from crashing/turning off thanks to low voltage with the old and crappy batteries.

Dont know why some people are upset by all this
 

Norbs12

Suspended
Apr 24, 2015
282
789
Mountain View, CA
"Apple would never intentionally do anything ... to drive customer upgrades."

What about the missing capacity option in iPhones???

Precisely the option that's best for most users is missing, driving people into upgrades either at purchase, or some time later.

For example now it's 64GB (too little) or 256GB (too much and very expensive), for many years.

I hate this, because I want to love and believe Apple.
That's on subject.
/s
 
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deanthedev

Suspended
Sep 29, 2017
1,287
2,406
Vancouver
The issue that I think Apple is going to have is that there are people who took their phones in and were told that they need to buy new ones because the batteries weren't bad enough to replace, but had they replaced the battery it would have fixed the problem. This screams that Apple did this intentionally or that those working at Apple were trying to get more sales, either way it is going to be a problem for Apple, as many people replaced their phones when they didn't really need to or want to do so.

You have no idea how many people upgraded their phones because of a bad battery. Nobody except Apple knows this. The lawyers filing all these lawsuits also lack this information. They're hoping and praying they find a smoking gun later on.

I'm sure there are people who upgraded when a battery would have fixed their old iPhone. But in order for this to be some kind of "conspiracy" by Apple to force people to upgrade (and generate additional sales) this number is going to have to be pretty significant. As in they had a huge rush of people come in and upgrade. If the numbers of upgrades are similar to previous years, then the cases will go nowhere.
 
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jmh600cbr

macrumors 65816
Feb 14, 2012
1,039
2,506
This is the same gorvernment that allows the telecom companies to secteteky drive prices up, disregard contracts and control consumption through and oligopoly. They are just jumping on the Apple train
 

Cloudkicker

macrumors 6502
Nov 29, 2016
403
411
London, Canada/Los Angeles, CA
Kind of odd how quickly this happened up here in Canada.

I want to see Canada ban colours of TidePods & force them to be made grey (gray with an 'e'). #TidePodsArentFood

If our neigbours to the south are expecting change from their gov on iPhones, just remember: The USA STILL hasn't banned those rolling death traps known as baby walkers!
 

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TheHammer

macrumors member
Feb 11, 2017
57
81
"Apple would never intentionally do anything ... to drive customer upgrades."

What about the missing capacity option in iPhones???

Precisely the option that's best for most users is missing, driving people into upgrades either at purchase, or some time later.

For example now it's 64GB (too little) or 256GB (too much and very expensive), for many years.

I hate this, because I want to love and believe Apple.


64gb has been perfect for me, Where I live in AU we have great 4G mobile coverage with great speeds. Everything is on iCloud and or streams from Apple Music. Its far from too small. If however, you don't have cheap, reliable 4G then they provide an alternative and its 256gb. Its not too much when you consider 4k at 60FPS is around 400mb for 60 seconds of video.

What do you want? Apple to Make a 32, 64, 128, 256? Why not a 512 and 1Tb?

The best for "most users" is not even a thing as everyone is different, these are two option that cover as many as possible. And as for "too expensive" any can say that about any product of apple. Its expected
 
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78Bandit

macrumors 6502a
Jun 13, 2009
688
1,252
I have lived with a <80% iPhone 6 for about half a year now until i replaced the battery yesterday, i never realized how slow my phone was thanks to the safeguard implemented by Apple.

But seriously, my phone is 4 years old now and lithium batteries wear out, cant expect them to last forever, no-one should, my old battery had almost 1500 cycles during these 4 years and yesterday i extended my phones life for 2 years atleast (although i will upgrade to the next X in the fall) for 29 dollar, the cost of 3-4 pizzas so i really dont get what all the fuzz is about, battery replacement was cheap before too and Apple gave the phones extended lives through software to safeguard the phones from crashing/turning off thanks to low voltage with the old and crappy batteries.

Dont know why some people are upset by all this

Because the random shutdowns were happening to phones less than two years old with less than 500 cycles on them and the batteries were testing fine at Apple's Genius bar. This became a public issue recently after Apple was forced to acknowledge the voltage clipping issue, but they had known they had a problem for quite a while now. They even had time to program specific test routines into the 10.2 iOS release trying to figure out what was going on.

Also, Apple acknowledged they implemented the throttling algorithm on the iPhone 7 with the release of iOS 11. The iPhone 7 wasn't even a year old at that point yet Apple is concerned about it randomly shutting down too.

The issue isn't four-year-old phones; it is the phones still under warranty or Apple Care that are well within the device's stated useful life and should be expected to function at 100%.
 

Tech198

Cancelled
Mar 21, 2011
15,915
2,151
"Second, Apple's actions related to performance of iPhones with older batteries were designed specifically to prevent some older models from unexpectedly shutting down under certain circumstances. And we communicated this publicly. Let me explain."

That, they do.. If your computer slowed down to keep an old batteries performance, suddenly we'd see a range PC laptop lawsuits on the horizon as well.
 
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CatalinApple

Contributor
Oct 28, 2016
276
288
Our motivation is always the user.
Dear Apple, your motivation isn't the user anymore, but the pile of cash you have. If you were motivated by the user, you wouldn't ask $\€\£1000 for your product. I have a feeling their profit margin is very high.

Anyway, it's not just Apple but every big company/corporation out there. They are all the same GREEDY!
 
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