Become a MacRumors Supporter for $50/year with no ads, ability to filter front page stories, and private forums.

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
63,490
30,731


A court in British Columbia, Canada today approved Apple's settlement related to the iPhone battery throttling controversy in 2018, according to CBC News.

iPhone-6s-MacRumors-YouTube.jpg

Apple agreed to pay up to $14.4 million (CAD) to settle a class action lawsuit in Canada that alleged the company secretly throttled the performance of some iPhone models. Each affected customer who submits a claim will receive a payment of between $17.50 and $150 (CAD) from Apple, with the exact payout amount to be dependent on the total number of claims submitted. More information on how to submit a claim will be shared on the settlement website, but a specific timeframe has yet to be provided.

The class includes any current or former resident of Canada (excluding Quebec) who owned and/or purchased an iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, and/or iPhone SE with iOS 10.2.1 or later installed or downloaded, and/or an iPhone 7 or iPhone 7 Plus with iOS 11.2 or later installed or downloaded, before December 21, 2017. A serial number will be required for each affected iPhone, according to CBC News.

Apple has denied the allegations described in the lawsuit, and the settlement does not represent an admission of fault. The settlement allows for Apple to avoid the additional time and costs involved with continued litigation.

Apple was sued in multiple Canadian provinces over iPhone battery throttling in 2018, including Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario, and Saskatchewan. The cases were filed shortly after Apple revealed that it had started throttling the maximum performance of some iPhone models with "chemically aged" batteries, when necessary, to prevent the devices from unexpectedly shutting down. Apple introduced this new power management system in iOS 10.2.1, but it initially failed to mention the change in that update's release notes, leading to public outcry. Apple eventually apologized about its lack of transparency, and temporarily lowered the price of iPhone battery replacements to $29 (USD) until the end of 2018.

Apple agreed to pay up to $500 million (USD) to settle a similar class action lawsuit in the U.S., and payments started going out in January there.

Article Link: Apple to Pay Canadian Customers Up to $150 Following iPhone Battery Controversy
 
Last edited:
  • Haha
Reactions: JapanApple

mike2q

macrumors regular
Mar 9, 2006
220
505
There's no guilt to admit to. Apple can't change the chemistry of batteries. They did what needed to be done to keep the phone working and stable.

They certainly choose the chemistry of their batteries but that's besides the point. They didn't need to throttle their phones for any end user benefits. If you believe they did then a bridge for sale metaphor comes to mind. Other phone manufacturers are somehow able to get by just fine without throttling so defending Apple on this one feels like defending an abusive relationship because you've had some good times together and they didn't mean to hurt you.
 

coolfactor

macrumors 604
Jul 29, 2002
7,043
9,706
Vancouver, BC
There was a LOT more to it than battery chemistry, but I've run out of steam to drag over it again so you can all ignore reality.

Apple was pushing for super-thin back then. It had a negative impact on battery life. Phones got thicker again, but now we're returning to thin again, likely because technology has improved.

I don't hold any hard feelings toward Apple trying to keep devices working well. Class-action lawsuits are rooted in selfish victim mindsets.
 

mike2q

macrumors regular
Mar 9, 2006
220
505
Apple was pushing for super-thin back then. It had a negative impact on battery life. Phones got thicker again, but now we're returning to thin again, likely because technology has improved.

I don't hold any hard feelings toward Apple trying to keep devices working well. Class-action lawsuits are rooted in selfish victim mindsets.

You don't have to have victim mentality to be victimized you know. Apple wasn't trying to keep your device working well or they wouldn't have hidden what they were doing before denying it before finally admitting it but with a shady explanation.
 

H2SO4

macrumors 603
Nov 4, 2008
5,651
6,937
Apple was pushing for super-thin back then. It had a negative impact on battery life. Phones got thicker again, but now we're returning to thin again, likely because technology has improved.

I don't hold any hard feelings toward Apple trying to keep devices working well. Class-action lawsuits are rooted in selfish victim mindsets.
Someone takes a phone in to an Apple store with a battery problem and instead of telling the customer what the problem was they told them in a lot of cases, You need a new phone.

So the question is, did Apple know what the problem was, before offering this 'fix'? Well lets's see.........
  • Apple receive millions of anonymous diagnostic reports when people sync their phones.
  • Apple have an official support forum, and although they maintain that no employees actually work there, (no doubt to be able to distance themselves from bad advice), they WILL get feedback about problems.
  • Apple have an official online support channel.
  • Apple Stores have Genius Bars that report back their findings.
  • There are countless other social media avenues that Apple will get wind of problems from, Facebook, Reddit etc.
Are you telling me that you don't believe that Apple, (collectively), lied to customers about what the problem was?
 

ort888

macrumors member
Oct 18, 2012
41
52
They certainly choose the chemistry of their batteries but that's besides the point. They didn't need to throttle their phones for any end user benefits. If you believe they did then a bridge for sale metaphor comes to mind. Other phone manufacturers are somehow able to get by just fine without throttling so defending Apple on this one feels like defending an abusive relationship because you've had some good times together and they didn't mean to hurt you.

This is such an old story that was all hashed out over and over and over again like 5 years ago. Tons of phones had this exact problem... but rather than throttling, they just let them hard shut off. They just didn't make the headlines because they weren't apple and apple gets the clicks.
 

DownUnderDan

macrumors 6502
Apr 19, 2018
339
464
Hobart Australia
This is such an old story that was all hashed out over and over and over again like 5 years ago. Tons of phones had this exact problem... but rather than throttling, they just let them hard shut off. They just didn't make the headlines because they weren't apple and apple gets the clicks.
So, your argument is they weren't any worse than the other shady industry practices of the time. Ok.
 

gnipgnop

macrumors 68020
Feb 18, 2009
2,177
2,893
Tons of phones had this exact problem...
Correction: EVERY phone with a lithium-ion battery had this problem. Phone sized lithium-ion batteries become less reliable for supplying system voltage demands in three situations:

1. Battery capacity is at 80% or lower.

2. Battery charge is at 20% or lower.

3. Battery is used in cold temperatures.

All three of those can result in a voltage demand that is too high for the battery to provide. So the phone will either shut off unexpectedly without a throttling feature or throttle.
 
  • Angry
Reactions: Victor Mortimer

BryanElliott

macrumors member
Jan 9, 2014
34
23
Los Santos
There's no guilt to admit to. Apple can't change the chemistry of batteries. They did what needed to be done to keep the phone working and stable.
I think what most people are mad about is that apple made the choice for the customer to keep the phone slow without letting the customer know WHY and if that were the case they should have given the customer the choice in making that performance/battery life decision and at the very least give us more information about our batteries instead of hiding it from us.
 

gnipgnop

macrumors 68020
Feb 18, 2009
2,177
2,893
I think what most people are mad about is that apple made the choice for the customer to keep the phone slow without letting the customer know WHY and if that were the case they should have given the customer the choice in making that performance/battery life decision and at the very least give us more information about our batteries instead of hiding it from us.
Does it really make sense to be mad that the phone throttles instead of shutting off without warning? Reason I say that is because whatever task you were doing on the phone that caused the voltage demand to be too high for the phone to provide isn't going to change just because you restarted the phone. It's just going to keep shutting off trying to do that task under the battery conditions I provided in the post above.
 

cocky jeremy

macrumors 603
Jul 12, 2008
6,115
6,362
They certainly choose the chemistry of their batteries but that's besides the point. They didn't need to throttle their phones for any end user benefits. If you believe they did then a bridge for sale metaphor comes to mind. Other phone manufacturers are somehow able to get by just fine without throttling so defending Apple on this one feels like defending an abusive relationship because you've had some good times together and they didn't mean to hurt you.
There's no abusive relationship to defend. I couldn't care less about it because I never keep my iPhone for a full year before upgrading.
 

rampancy

macrumors 6502a
Jul 22, 2002
662
896
I think the most I ever got from these lawsuits was like $50 from a Microsoft class-action suit that was filed in Canada a few years ago. I got a similar amount from a RAM price-fixing class-action suit a while back too.

I'm curious to know how much I'll get out of this. Even if it's just $10, that'll be enough to keep my Tim Horton's habit going for a few weeks.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Victor Mortimer
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.