Apple TV+ Offers Highest Quality 4K Streaming, Averaging Up to 29Mbps

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Apple TV+ has the highest 4K streaming quality offered by a streaming service that supports 4K, according to testing conducted by FlatpanelsHD founder Rasmus Larsen.

Larsen says that the Apple TV+ offers higher quality 4K streaming than most iTunes movies, based on averages of the variable bitrate employed by the service.


"See" had the highest bitrate of an Apple TV+ show tested, averaging a 29Mb/s video bitrate and a 41Mb/s peak.

"The Elephant Queen" averaged right around 26Mb/s for video bitrate, and other content, such as "Snoopy in Space" also performed well.

According to Larsen, the Apple TV+ offers 1.5 to 2x the video bitrate of a typical HD Blu-ray disc and around half of a typical UHD Blu-ray disc.

Comparatively, Netflix's 4K bitrate appears to max out at right around 16Mb/s, though Netflix requires a 25Mb/s connection to stream 4K content.

Article Link: Apple TV+ Offers Highest Quality 4K Streaming, Averaging Up to 29Mbps
 
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bladerunner2000

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Jun 12, 2015
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Bitrate means nothing. It's the compression settings that matter more. If anyone's used handbrake with some advanced settings, you'll know that bitrate only matters so much. I can compress a full length 2hr 1080p movie down to about 3.5gb in file size with almost no noticeable difference in picture quality unless you pixel peek overlaying the original and compressed still frames. Granted, the 3.5gb file size is typically with movies where there isn't a lot of noise/grain.

Furthermore, bitrate is absolutely a moot point when the content sucks. Given Apple's inability to produce a solid product even in their own tech market... I have ZERO confidence in Apple knowing how to make a movie or TV series.
 

Mr. Turtle

macrumors newbie
Jun 8, 2016
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Is this really perceptible in a common man's living room or is this just a spec brag that is real only on paper??
this depends on your setup really. If you have a low end tv you may not notice it but with a high end setup you definitely do. It’s just the same with audio. Is Dolby atmos really noticeable? Yes, depending on your setup. And that’s how it should be. If you only have an old iPad to watch shows on or an old external display, you should still be able to watch them, but if you spend money on nice hardware, the content shouldn’t artificially degrade it by just being bad quality.
 

nutmac

macrumors 601
Mar 30, 2004
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Correct link

While higher quality is welcomed, it's probably not great for those with capped Internet service, such as my Comcast's lousy 1TB limit.

30 Mbps translate to 13.5 GB/hour, or 75 hours.

Having said that, I am not sure these numbers are correct. Downloaded episode of For All Mankind (about an hour each) is averaging less than 3 GB for me, with 'Download HDR Video" setting turned on.

Still looks pretty great though.
 

Mr. Turtle

macrumors newbie
Jun 8, 2016
9
104
Bitrate means nothing. It's the compression settings that matter more. If anyone's used handbrake with some advanced settings, you'll know that bitrate only matters so much. I can compress a full length 2hr 1080p movie down to about 3.5gb in file size with almost no noticeable difference in picture quality unless you pixel peek overlaying the original and compressed still frames. Granted, the 3.5gb file size is typically with movies where there isn't a lot of noise/grain.

Furthermore, bitrate is absolutely a moot point when the content sucks. Given Apple's inability to produce a solid product even in their own tech market... I have ZERO confidence in Apple knowing how to make a movie or TV series.

regarding your first point... that is technically wrong. The compression determines the Bitrate and less compressed, higher quality content, (in general) has a higher Bitrate. Of course the Compression type is also a variable, but it’s way less important then the compression “strength”.

furthermore, you really have no idea what you’re talking about and at this point your just trolling so I’m not going to waste my time any further.
 

Blue Hawk

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Dec 18, 2017
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Does someone know the quality of the Full HD shows of Apple TV+ and iTunes Store? To me the quality is a lot better than from Amazon and Netflix. Netflix really sucks at 1080p.
 

Mr. Turtle

macrumors newbie
Jun 8, 2016
9
104
Correct link

While higher quality is welcomed, it's probably not great for those with capped Internet service, such as my Comcast's lousy 1TB limit.

30 Mbps translate to 13.5 GB/hour, or 75 hours.

Having said that, I am not sure these numbers are correct. Downloaded episode of For All Mankind (about an hour each) is averaging less than 3 GB for me, with 'Download HDR Video" setting turned on.

Still looks pretty great though.
itunes movies don’t download in 4K, only stream. I imagine this to be true for Apple TV+ too, since I haven’t read the opposite anywhere. Therefore, of course downloaded content will be smaller.
 
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reallynotnick

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Oct 21, 2005
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what is the audio bitrate though
The linked post says the audio is 384kb/s AC3, which seems really odd when competitors like Netflix are doing 640kb/s DD+ for 5.1 and 768kb/s DD+ for Atmos. He did say he wasn't hooked up to an Atmos system so it's going to be different with that as that requires DD+.
 

Iconoclysm

macrumors 68020
May 13, 2010
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Given Apple's inability to produce a solid product even in their own tech market... I have ZERO confidence in Apple knowing how to make a movie or TV series.
This makes everything else you said mean absolutely nothing. Not that you were even correct in your assumptions around bitrate based on experience with handbrake... I mean, you're completely clueless about it in fact. It's no wonder you make such ridiculous statements about Apple and technology in general - just stop embarrassing yourself. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bit_rate
 

twolf2919

macrumors regular
Aug 26, 2014
158
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Bitrate means nothing. It's the compression settings that matter more. If anyone's used handbrake with some advanced settings, you'll know that bitrate only matters so much. I can compress a full length 2hr 1080p movie down to about 3.5gb in file size with almost no noticeable difference in picture quality unless you pixel peek overlaying the original and compressed still frames. Granted, the 3.5gb file size is typically with movies where there isn't a lot of noise/grain.

Furthermore, bitrate is absolutely a moot point when the content sucks. Given Apple's inability to produce a solid product even in their own tech market... I have ZERO confidence in Apple knowing how to make a movie or TV series.
Make up your mind - in the first sentence, bitrate "means nothing". In the second sentence bitrate "only matters so much". Since we don't know what compression settings the different streaming companies use, one must assume they're similar. In which case, bitrate means a lot more.

Lastly, while your last comment is correct, it's also completely meaningless, since everybody has a different notion of what "sucks" and some folks even adjust their definition of "sucks" based on what the content costs them. I'm a much harsher critic of a movie I just paid $15 to see vs. content that cost me nothing.
 

azentropy

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Jul 19, 2002
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Is this really perceptible in a common man's living room or is this just a spec brag that is real only on paper??
Depends on the setup and the person. I have a 65" 4K TV and typically sit about 12 feet away. I'm in my late 40's and with my eyes I can't really distinguish the difference between 1080p and 4K anymore. So all it would do for me is eat my data cap. CNET used to have a great visual for showing the size and distance most people with 20/20 could distinguish the difference, however I wasn't able to find it anymore.
 

az431

Suspended
Sep 13, 2008
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Portland, OR
Bitrate means nothing. It's the compression settings that matter more. If anyone's used handbrake with some advanced settings, you'll know that bitrate only matters so much. I can compress a full length 2hr 1080p movie down to about 3.5gb in file size with almost no noticeable difference in picture quality unless you pixel peek overlaying the original and compressed still frames. Granted, the 3.5gb file size is typically with movies where there isn't a lot of noise/grain.

Furthermore, bitrate is absolutely a moot point when the content sucks. Given Apple's inability to produce a solid product even in their own tech market... I have ZERO confidence in Apple knowing how to make a movie or TV series.
Well reasoned points with the exception of the unnecessary and illogical rant at the end. Producing TV shows and software engineering have little in common.
 
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djcerla

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Apr 23, 2015
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Given Apple's inability to produce a solid product even in their own tech market... I have ZERO confidence in Apple knowing how to make (insert category)
I Keep reading this since my first Internet connection in 1998. Like a constant, whining note. Which proves itself wrong,year after year, while the company makes metric tons of money selling solid products.
 

bladerunner2000

macrumors 68020
Jun 12, 2015
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This makes everything else you said mean absolutely nothing. Not that you were even correct in your assumptions around bitrate based on experience with handbrake... I mean, you're completely clueless about it in fact. It's no wonder you make such ridiculous statements about Apple and technology in general - just stop embarrassing yourself. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bit_rate
It's painful reading your response. Listen bud, high bitrate is largely useless. 30mb/s... wow! Yeah, high quality, sure! But you could get the same IQ with a better a better compression and reduce the file size, stream size and allow your viewers to watch with slower internet connections or those with bandwidth caps. OR even better picture quality with adjusted settings for the right content. But hey, who cares about that, right? As long as Apple's got MUH HIGH BITRATE, it means they win!

This is the same ridiculous argument u kids are making like those that think megapixel counts matter with camera sensors.

Like I said; bitrate is useless. Go high enough on a bitrate and you'll get high quality... but there's a point of diminishing returns as I've stated earlier. You only think slapping a high bitrate and nothing else seems to do the trick.

Guess you've never taken a look at something like this:

 

MrGuder

macrumors 68030
Nov 30, 2012
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I got a refurb apple 4k tv works great on my 720p tv. But I’m waiting for black fri deals to buy a 4K tv.