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pasamio

macrumors 6502
Jan 22, 2020
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My point is putty just works and doesn't cost anything. Where is putty for Mac? I guess Mac users just have money to blow.

I always viewed PuTTY being a necessary thing on Windows because that platform didn't have a modern terminal emulator until Microsoft started their Windows Terminal project. I personally never saw an issue with it on the Mac because I just fired up Terminal.app to run what ever I needed just as I would do with my Linux desktop and it's terminal emulators. Windows Console didn't cut it, even with Powershell, so it's good to see Microsoft getting back to investing in these sorts of tools. PuTTY filled a gap in missing tooling that the Mac shipped with by default.
 

kc9hzn

macrumors 68000
Jun 18, 2020
1,603
1,909
I always viewed PuTTY being a necessary thing on Windows because that platform didn't have a modern terminal emulator until Microsoft started their Windows Terminal project. I personally never saw an issue with it on the Mac because I just fired up Terminal.app to run what ever I needed just as I would do with my Linux desktop and it's terminal emulators. Windows Console didn't cut it, even with Powershell, so it's good to see Microsoft getting back to investing in these sorts of tools. PuTTY filled a gap in missing tooling that the Mac shipped with by default.
I think PuTTY supports serial connections. Not that I ever use it for that, I only use it for SSHing into Unix machines. And any proper UNIX, macOS included, has a terminal emulator with SSH included by default. I haven’t had to send packets over a serial connection in ages. Now, I don’t think macOS includes a serial terminal emulator in the default install (though the Lisa had one and the Mac had one back when that sort of thing was more necessary), and I could be wrong and Terminal.app could support it somewhere in its settings. I just don’t have a Mac in front of me to check.
 

pasamio

macrumors 6502
Jan 22, 2020
355
297
I think PuTTY supports serial connections. Not that I ever use it for that, I only use it for SSHing into Unix machines. And any proper UNIX, macOS included, has a terminal emulator with SSH included by default. I haven’t had to send packets over a serial connection in ages. Now, I don’t think macOS includes a serial terminal emulator in the default install (though the Lisa had one and the Mac had one back when that sort of thing was more necessary), and I could be wrong and Terminal.app could support it somewhere in its settings. I just don’t have a Mac in front of me to check.

You should be able to use "screen" to connect up a serial device which is shipped by default. I did a search for "screen serial port" in Google and it found this page on Mac's and serial TTY's. Google found a few more guides though it's first result was the Fedora Project's page on using screen to connect to the serial console.
 
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jinnj

macrumors 6502a
Dec 9, 2011
551
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Umm Steam has a Kext that adds support for most games. So maybe ask instead of assuming. In windows you can use drivers ("kexts") so things work regardless of support. Apple can advertise they are adding controller support all day but they are making it only work on an extremely small subset of programs.

My point is putty just works and doesn't cost anything. Where is putty for Mac? I guess Mac users just have money to blow.

Yes there is a hypervisor that I'm am relying on people to properly utilize. Docker works. Great. How about a decent hypervisor that's free to work with full Ubuntu and Windows ARM?
You can add your own custom controller drivers without resorting to kext or Apple's Game Controller framework.

Putty is just a ****** UI to the terminal ssh command. The UI goes against any guidelines for any Operating System. If you get an error when opening a connection then you need to reload the application and try again! I guess if you need a button to click instead of just typing ssh <ip or alias of server> then Putty is for you.

You are confusing the hypervisor with a virtual machine application. Apple's Hypervisor and MS' Hyper-V are OS level frameworks. What you are talking about is Windows Subsystem for Linux which is something that Windows desperately needed and MacOS already had. The majority of Linux applications can compile to run on Mac so why run Ubuntu when you can run it native. Also Windows still has issues interacting with WSL.
 

leman

macrumors Core
Oct 14, 2008
19,301
19,279
macOS continues to get dumber and more locked down and more fisher price while funny enough Windows is looking like a proper grown up desktop OS that keeps opening doors to more power tools with things like the Linux shell

At some point I just have to ignore M1 benchmarks and come to the realization that I’m spending a premium to get a locked down experience where they own everything about the software and hardware and don’t even let me repair my own hardware or plug in the peripherals I need without buying their dongles. Just terrible

What you wrote makes no sense whatsoever. MacOS is getting “dumber” because Apple replaces and improves a set of core frameworks? Sure thing...

The reality is exactly the opposite. Big Sur is a huge step towards flexibility not yet seen on macOS. CoreML, game controller suppport, ray tracing, custom kernel booting on M1... just a few things that show that Apple is as committed to user experience as ever.
 
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Stephen.R

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There is no quick open source SSH app that has a session manager. I could say the same thing about Windows and use the built in SSH client but it doesn’t scale.

My point is putty just works and doesn't cost anything. Where is putty for Mac? I guess Mac users just have money to blow.

To answer your question literally, why not just install the macOS port of Putty?https://www.ssh.com/ssh/putty/mac/#ported-putty-for-mac

If you don't want to use the macOS port, OpenSSH has support for named configurations, and macOS Terminal.app has support for saving "remote session" bookmarks (right click the Dock, New Remote Connection, hit the + icon in the server list) if you really don't want to type `ssh <config or host name>` a few times.

If you want to quickly re-open say, 10 connections to Linux servers and have them resume the previous shell session, I'd guess you need about 15 lines of AppleScript or even just regular shell, and something like screen on the remote connection.


I guess Mac users just have money to blow.

It is literally a phenomenon that Mac and iOS users typically spend more on software than Windows or Android.

Windows is looking like a proper grown up desktop OS that keeps opening doors to more power tools with things like the Linux shell

If all you want is a POSIX shell, macOS has had that for literally decades.

If you specifically want a Linux shell, macOS will run a VM, just like "WSL2" uses - except, it won't force your host OS (macOS in this case) to also run in a VM, as WSL2 does.

Before anyone misreads or misunderstands this: Yes, WSL2 uses a Hyper-V based VM to provide a Linux VM. Hyper-V works as a Type-1 hypervisor, so it runs on bare metal, and hosts multiple VMs (somewhat similar to Xen). When you use WSL2, it's running two VMs: Windows, and Linux. If you happen to want a non-HyperV based virtualisation solution (e.g. VMWare, or a Vagrant VM using Virtualbox) - tough. HyperV doesn't support "nested virtualisation" (i.e. it doesn't provide the VM's it runs access to the CPU's hardware features that support virtualisation) so you can't use both at once.


Yes there is a hypervisor that I'm am relying on people to properly utilize. Docker works. Great. How about a decent hypervisor that's free to work with full Ubuntu and Windows ARM?
UTM is a $10, one-time purchase. HyperV is part of Windows 10 Pro, which retails for $200. Sure, you may not pay that cost directly if you buy a Windows 10 PC, but it's not accurate to describe the feature as "free" when it's only included with a paid product.

If your environment is for work, I'd imagine you can expense the cost of Parallels Pro/Business and/or VMWare Fusion Pro as a company cost. If it's for personal use, you probably qualify to use the free Fusion Player license: https://my.vmware.com/web/vmware/evalcenter?p=fusion-player-personal
 

kc9hzn

macrumors 68000
Jun 18, 2020
1,603
1,909
It is literally a phenomenon that Mac and iOS users typically spend more on software than Windows or Android.
And that’s partially down to who uses what system. Most of the Android users I’ve met (and I used to be unofficial front-line technical support in a public facing capacity, so I ended up helping a lot of Android and iPhone users) aren’t really interested in doing “smartphone” things beyond having a web browser, email, messaging, maps, or downloading apps for social media services. At most, they might be playing simple tap-and-swipe games. And many Android and Windows users aren’t especially tech savvy, I’ve noticed that many of them seem somewhat afraid of downloading apps or making configuration changes to their phone in the settings app. They seem to think they’ll end up breaking their phone or something, while Mac and iOS users often seem more empowered to make various changes to their devices. It’s because technophiles wanting freedom to make config changes aren’t the primary purchasers of Windows and Android based devices, it’s technophobes who want a budget device for doing a handful of things that barely require “smarts”. I guess I’m just saying that Mac and iPhone users are individually more likely to be more tech savvy than purchasers of margin budget PCs and smartphones and are more likely to seek out software from third parties, rather than the behavior of seeking out third party software being due to deficiencies in Apple’s bundled software. (Consider the number of paid GTD-esque task managers on Mac/iOS when Apple offers the surprisingly capable Reminders app. Reminders is better than anything on the stock Windows or Android install (the closest on Windows seems to be Outlook, which requires access to MS Office and is not part of the default install and honestly doesn’t have the level of system integration Reminders has [Outlook seems to be best for things that already live in its Email/Calendar/Contacts ecosystem]), but Mac power users clamor for even more.
 

leman

macrumors Core
Oct 14, 2008
19,301
19,279
And that’s partially down to who uses what system. Most of the Android users I’ve met (and I used to be unofficial front-line technical support in a public facing capacity, so I ended up helping a lot of Android and iPhone users) aren’t really interested in doing “smartphone” things beyond having a web browser, email, messaging, maps, or downloading apps for social media services. At most, they might be playing simple tap-and-swipe games. And many Android and Windows users aren’t especially tech savvy, I’ve noticed that many of them seem somewhat afraid of downloading apps or making configuration changes to their phone in the settings app. They seem to think they’ll end up breaking their phone or something, while Mac and iOS users often seem more empowered to make various changes to their devices. It’s because technophiles wanting freedom to make config changes aren’t the primary purchasers of Windows and Android based devices, it’s technophobes who want a budget device for doing a handful of things that barely require “smarts”. I guess I’m just saying that Mac and iPhone users are individually more likely to be more tech savvy than purchasers of margin budget PCs and smartphones and are more likely to seek out software from third parties, rather than the behavior of seeking out third party software being due to deficiencies in Apple’s bundled software. (Consider the number of paid GTD-esque task managers on Mac/iOS when Apple offers the surprisingly capable Reminders app. Reminders is better than anything on the stock Windows or Android install (the closest on Windows seems to be Outlook, which requires access to MS Office and is not part of the default install and honestly doesn’t have the level of system integration Reminders has [Outlook seems to be best for things that already live in its Email/Calendar/Contacts ecosystem]), but Mac power users clamor for even more.

An interesting perspective, since the common stereotype states that it's the Apple users who are tech-illiterate and fashion driven, while tech savvy users supposedly get Windows and Android for their versatility.

Incidentally, I agree with you ;)
 

Stromos

macrumors 6502a
Jul 1, 2016
798
1,924
Woodstock, GA
To answer your question literally, why not just install the macOS port of Putty?https://www.ssh.com/ssh/putty/mac/#ported-putty-for-mac

If you don't want to use the macOS port, OpenSSH has support for named configurations, and macOS Terminal.app has support for saving "remote session" bookmarks (right click the Dock, New Remote Connection, hit the + icon in the server list) if you really don't want to type `ssh <config or host name>` a few times.

If you want to quickly re-open say, 10 connections to Linux servers and have them resume the previous shell session, I'd guess you need about 15 lines of AppleScript or even just regular shell, and something like screen on the remote connection.




It is literally a phenomenon that Mac and iOS users typically spend more on software than Windows or Android.



If all you want is a POSIX shell, macOS has had that for literally decades.

If you specifically want a Linux shell, macOS will run a VM, just like "WSL2" uses - except, it won't force your host OS (macOS in this case) to also run in a VM, as WSL2 does.

Before anyone misreads or misunderstands this: Yes, WSL2 uses a Hyper-V based VM to provide a Linux VM. Hyper-V works as a Type-1 hypervisor, so it runs on bare metal, and hosts multiple VMs (somewhat similar to Xen). When you use WSL2, it's running two VMs: Windows, and Linux. If you happen to want a non-HyperV based virtualisation solution (e.g. VMWare, or a Vagrant VM using Virtualbox) - tough. HyperV doesn't support "nested virtualisation" (i.e. it doesn't provide the VM's it runs access to the CPU's hardware features that support virtualisation) so you can't use both at once.



UTM is a $10, one-time purchase. HyperV is part of Windows 10 Pro, which retails for $200. Sure, you may not pay that cost directly if you buy a Windows 10 PC, but it's not accurate to describe the feature as "free" when it's only included with a paid product.

If your environment is for work, I'd imagine you can expense the cost of Parallels Pro/Business and/or VMWare Fusion Pro as a company cost. If it's for personal use, you probably qualify to use the free Fusion Player license: https://my.vmware.com/web/vmware/evalcenter?p=fusion-player-personal
Considering I’m running Ubuntu 20.04 with full KVM nested virtualization in WSL 2.0 you need to update your facts. No you don’t need the full HyperV role to enable WSL anymore. The biggest thing is you need to compile a Kernel with KVM.

And as for the port of Putty. Installing an entire Macports/brew blown out over complicated solution for something that’s less than 10 meg on a flash drive with portable sessions is amusing. Just admit it’s complicated for no reason.

Yes I can write scripts and everything else to manage SSH on a Mac sync the configs to iCloud etc. Once again new windows pc copy a couple files off a flash drive boom everything is there ready to ago in a GUI.

I ended up buying Shelly for 10 bucks just to not deal with it. 10 bucks and a couple hours copying all my Putty configs to it then setting up iCloud sync between devices. I already purchased a different app (Prompt 2) to do this and did all this work but that’s what you get with Apple ecosystem. At any time developer drops support and you have the privilege to start over with another developer you hope sticks with it. There’s no tried and true open source app that’s used by millions for years because Apple frowns on free. You can make it work if you jump though enough hoops. But those same hoops turn the open source community away from spending time and resources on the ports.

Another week has gone by and I check all the bookmarks. Steam has zero interest spending the time to create a controller driver for M1s. Cura acknowledges you can’t use their software on M1s and it is likely a year plus away from a working port. I close the lid on the M1 and do work my my windows machine because web surfing is what it does well.
 

Stephen.R

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Nov 2, 2018
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you need to update your facts.
It appears the update providing nested virtualisation is from the middle of last year. It's good that they finally support this.


The biggest thing is you need to compile a Kernel with KVM.

I found a post documenting the process, and for someone complaining about no free SSH bookmarks in a ready-built .exe, you seem to be glossing over a lot of work required to make this work.


Installing an entire Macports/brew blown out over complicated solution for something that’s less than 10 meg on a flash drive with portable sessions is amusing.
I agree that installing macports or home-brew just for a ****** port of a crap windows program is not worth it. But then I don't think that there's anything wrong with typing "ssh <host>" either.


There’s no tried and true open source app that’s used by millions for years because Apple frowns on free.
What, like... what's that one that all the cool Linux kids use...... oh right. OpenSSH.

Steam has zero interest spending the time to create a controller driver for M1s. Cura acknowledges you can’t use their software on M1s and it is likely a year plus away from a working port. I close the lid on the M1 and do work my my windows machine because web surfing is what it does well

TIL playing games on Steam is "work", and that because a piece of software for 3d printing doesn't work, a computer is only useful for "web surfing".


Your post jumps all over the place between justifying jumping through a ridiculous number of hoops, to complaining about third party developers and the lack of a single specific tool in a pre-packaged binary.


You should work the way you want to work. If that means using a Windows PC and a Linux VM, then do that. But don't pretend that because you prefer that setup, that it's the only one that works.
 

leman

macrumors Core
Oct 14, 2008
19,301
19,279
And as for the port of Putty. Installing an entire Macports/brew blown out over complicated solution for something that’s less than 10 meg on a flash drive with portable sessions is amusing. Just admit it’s complicated for no reason.

Yes I can write scripts and everything else to manage SSH on a Mac sync the configs to iCloud etc. Once again new windows pc copy a couple files off a flash drive boom everything is there ready to ago in a GUI.

Sorry bud, as someone who uses Unix shell and SSH on a daily basis, all this sounds to me as a rant of a person who is overly fixed on their own idiosyncratic workflow and refuses to a adapt to a new situation. If you want a SSH sessions UI, there is one built into macOS itself — it's called Terminal.

There’s no tried and true open source app that’s used by millions for years because Apple frowns on free.

Putty is a Windows app. And it only exists because Windows terminal support used to be an utter garbage. Are you really ranting that macOS does not run a Windows app natively?

As to "free" — I can compile and run more open source stuff on Mac than I can on Windows without jumping though any hoops. MacOS itself is to a large degree open source. Here, go browse macOS and iOS source code: https://opensource.apple.com

There is nothing wrong with having a strong opinion. But a strong opinion should be backed by knowledge and education. Your opinion is basically "I am used to X, but I can't use X on Mac, so Mac must be bad". It's like this famous Russian designer who was criticizing Mac could of years ago because you see, "CMD+C" is not the copy shortcut he was used to.
 
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Stromos

macrumors 6502a
Jul 1, 2016
798
1,924
Woodstock, GA
It appears the update providing nested virtualisation is from the middle of last year. It's good that they finally support this.




I found a post documenting the process, and for someone complaining about no free SSH bookmarks in a ready-built .exe, you seem to be glossing over a lot of work required to make this work.



I agree that installing macports or home-brew just for a ****** port of a crap windows program is not worth it. But then I don't think that there's anything wrong with typing "ssh <host>" either.



What, like... what's that one that all the cool Linux kids use...... oh right. OpenSSH.



TIL playing games on Steam is "work", and that because a piece of software for 3d printing doesn't work, a computer is only useful for "web surfing".


Your post jumps all over the place between justifying jumping through a ridiculous number of hoops, to complaining about third party developers and the lack of a single specific tool in a pre-packaged binary.


You should work the way you want to work. If that means using a Windows PC and a Linux VM, then do that. But don't pretend that because you prefer that setup, that it's the only one that works.

Sorry bud, as someone who uses Unix shell and SSH on a daily basis, all this sounds to me as a rant of a person who is overly fixed on their own idiosyncratic workflow and refuses to a adapt to a new situation. If you want a SSH sessions UI, there is one built into macOS itself — it's called Terminal.



Putty is a Windows app. And it only exists because Windows terminal support used to be an utter garbage. Are you really ranting that macOS does not run a Windows app natively?

As to "free" — I can compile and run more open source stuff on Mac than I can on Windows without jumping though any hoops. MacOS itself is to a large degree open source. Here, go browse macOS and iOS source code: https://opensource.apple.com

There is nothing wrong with having a strong opinion. But a strong opinion should be backed by knowledge and education. Your opinion is basically "I am used to X, but I can't use X on Mac, so Mac must be bad". It's like this famous Russian designer who was criticizing Mac could of years ago because you see, "CMD+C" is not the copy shortcut he was used to.
Never said steam was work. You know some of us do like to relax sometimes.

Cura is one of the main programs for 3D printing. There is no M1 alternative right now shy of compiling pursa slicer yourself which won't even support the printing setups I have so once again no good option.

I could do everything you're saying on my $1500 M1 Mac I bought. I could also do everything your saying on a raspberry pi or a chromebook (terminal, compiling apps, etc.)

I've been reading for years the amazement of Mac computers and how it just works.

If I'm compiling software or just doing it via command-line where is the wow factor? Where is the simplicity?

More than anything if this very article that started this argument doesn't tell you that the days of just installing macports and brew and compile what you wish have the possibility of going away or being hindered in the future you lack foresight. Mac is pushing their appstore harder and harder and when you look at what's available through that lens you see how little opensource is out there.

If I am going to do the work of compiling software to work with I am not going to do it on a $1500 laptop running Darwin. Just going to do it in real Linux.

The M1 is an amazing processor I wanted to leverage to do things I do all the time. The software is lacking or expensive. It's as simple as that.

What do I do when I get home or have some free time. Play a game? Not on the M1. Manage my home labs? Yes if I use Shelly which I purchased. Work on some 3D models which more than anything I wanted to do with this M1? No because there is no decent/compatible slicer. You poked at me complaining about this but I'm pretty sure I've heard for years this is what Macs are for!

Yes its all me and my use case. But that's all any of us are. You can be mad about it but the M1 I bought adds nothing to the table in technology in my house. I have zero reason to spend money on software that I either have for free or have better support/features on other platforms.
 

Stephen.R

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Never said steam was work. You know some of us do like to relax sometimes.
You had four sentences in a paragraph, one saying that you check on the status of stuff every week. Then one each mentioning a specific app, and then one "wrapping up" saying:

I close the lid on the M1 and do work my my windows machine because web surfing is what it does well.

This type of structure gives the impression that the last sentence applies to those that preceded it.

Cura is one of the main programs for 3D printing. There is no M1 alternative right now shy of compiling pursa slicer yourself which won't even support the printing setups I have so once again no good option.
Yep. It's a transition. This is not new territory. Most of us went through the PPC to Intel transition. A smaller number went through the 68K to PPC transition.

I've been reading for years the amazement of Mac computers and how it just works.

If I'm compiling software or just doing it via command-line where is the wow factor? Where is the simplicity?

I don't think "it just works" was ever meant to be interpreted as "every single thing just works like magic regardless of context". For the vast majority of Mac users, compiling software is not something they'll ever do, and using the command line is, while more likely than compiling software, still something most will never need to do.


the days of just installing macports and brew and compile what you wish have the possibility of going away or being hindered in the future you lack foresight
I can't comment on the future likelyhood of homebrew or macports being available, as I don't use either of them (If I need a piece of software that isn't packaged for macOS, I download the source and compile it). Having said that I'd find it extremely concerning if either one of them needed a kernel extension to operate.

Mac is pushing their appstore harder and harder and when you look at what's available through that lens you see how little opensource is out there.
Is it really so hard to understand that Apple is the company and Mac is a product name? No one says "Zinger Burger is really pushing their double cheese burger now".

The change mentioned in the article is about one very specific thing used by a small amount of software, that causes proportionally way more issues than other software.

The Mac App Store is Apple's solution for making things a lot easier for users, if they wish to use that option. It's simpler licensing, simpler payment, and simpler installation. That isn't my opinion it's just a fact. You can argue that some apps will have reduced functionality when sold via the App Store, or that some aren't available, both are true, but for the average user, it's a better customer experience, without a doubt.


But Apple have also reiterated, numerous times, that installing Apps directly isn't going away.

Most open source projects are not available via the App Store, no. That doesn't mean open source can't be available via the App Store - there are Apps in the App Store, for sale, that are also available as source for free. It also doesn't really mean much, because your assumption that Apple is restricting software to the Mac App Store is baseless.

If I am going to do the work of compiling software to work with I am not going to do it on a $1500 laptop running Darwin. Just going to do it in real Linux.
... "real Linux"? As opposed to what? "I can't believe it's not Linux"?. Please enlighten me about these fake Linuxes, so I can be on the lookout for them.

What do I do when I get home or have some free time. Play a game? Not on the M1. Manage my home labs? Yes if I use Shelly which I purchased. Work on some 3D models which more than anything I wanted to do with this M1? No because there is no decent/compatible slicer. You poked at me complaining about this but I'm pretty sure I've heard for years this is what Macs are for!
Who has been saying "for years" that Macs are "for": playing games (really?), running Putty (seriously, I still cannot believe you're complaining about 'no putty'. It's like that kid in Faulty Towers who demands salad cream because he doesn't want hand made mayonnaise), or using specific 3d printing software?

You're clearly technical enough to realise that the M1 Macs are a huge difference to the Intel Macs they replaced, but it didn't occur to you, to check if the software you want to use would be compatible with a brand new CPU architecture, in the first few months of said arch being available?


Yes its all me and my use case. But that's all any of us are.
I don't think I've ever met anyone who's so steadfastly insistent that they must use their own specific solution carried over from a completely different context, as you are.

I'm quite honestly surprised you didn't complain about the lack of Internet Explorer for macOS.


You can be mad about it but the M1 I bought
Why would I be mad? You bought something that apparently doesn't suit your needs.

I don't have an M1 Mac. I looked at what they're offering and (a) they don't support enough memory for my use-case, and (b) the IDE I use for most of my work is from a third party, and thus potentially will not be 'optimised' for Arm Macs for a little while. That's called "doing basic product research before buying".


I have zero reason to spend money on software that I either have for free or have better support/features on other platforms.
So... use them then? What do you want from us?

You chose to buy one of the launch models, of a new CPU architecture, using an OS you've apparently not used before, and you're complaining that things are different.

No **** sherlock.
 

leman

macrumors Core
Oct 14, 2008
19,301
19,279
That's just complete BS. Parallels preview runs on the M1 without virtualizing anything.

Wow, Parallels found a way to run an OS within an OS without virtualization? What is this magical new technology? I am sure that Amazon, VMWare and Linux are trembling in fear...
 

tanoanian

macrumors member
Dec 4, 2016
88
160
Uh... what? It's not useless. I use it for all sorts of things. Windows ARM, Ubuntu, etc. Not going to say it's perfect or for everyone, but not useless.
You might be the only person with access to Windows ARM on the M1 (most people don't have access) that thinks Windows ARM isn't useless.
 

thedocbwarren

macrumors 6502
Nov 10, 2017
430
378
San Francisco, CA
You might be the only person with access to Windows ARM on the M1 (most people don't have access) that thinks Windows ARM isn't useless.
Don't think that's true as I'm nothing special with either. It requires an account and a signup on both to use them. As of now there aren't full licenses for both technologies, only the preview licenses.

You can get on the technical preview of Parallels from their site. You will want the insider preview for Windows ARM as well (requires signup and a Win 10 VM/Machine to download.)

You get the licenses from Parallels for their preview and no licenses are out yet for ARM Windows (although others have used a Pro license.)
 
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