Apple wants $1250 to change the battery on a MacBook Pro

tubeexperience

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Original poster
Feb 17, 2016
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A few years ago, I got a really good deal on a Mid 2012 MacBook Pro Retina 15-inch because someone spilled Sprite on it.

The logic board was completely dead so I took out the logic board and sent it to an independent shop for component level repair.

The computer works great so I gave it to my sister.

The computer has worked fine since then.

Anyway, it has been a few years and the computer is telling her to replace the battery.

She sent it to Apple, but Apple wants to charge her $1250.
 
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rigormortis

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Jun 11, 2009
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its $199 or less plus tax

https://support.apple.com/mac-notebooks/repair/service/pricing

if they want $1250 , then you must have a broken lcd panel or a bad logic board or something else must be seriously wrong with it

you fried the logic board. thats why it costs so much

back up the computer to time machine . buy a new one, restore from its time machine, recycle computer is probably the best option
 
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Queen6

macrumors G3
Easy answer the liquid intrusion detectors are likely triggered, so Apple will want to replace the majority of the boards. My own feelings in such cases are that Apple should just change the battery at the normal rate, asking the owner to sign a disclosure to protect Apple, additionally offering to bring the unit back up to Apple`s own spec at the offered flat rate of $1250.

At $1250, it`s not a bad price (by Apple`s standards) to bring a non functional 15" Retina back to full working order, equally in this case it makes little sense as the notebook barring the battery has no issue. Unfortunately more & more, it`s take it or leave it, in Apple`s ecosystem.

Best advise source a decent independent specialist to replace the battery, equally that will be more than the stock price from Apple, however nowhere close to the current asking price of $1250.

From my own perspective I rather expect all my newer Mac portables to have triggered detectors, as I frequently work in the tropics with very high levels humidity, which at times is not able to be fuly controlled. Should I encounter the same rhetoric from Apple and they not listen to reason, this will almost certainly end my relationship with Apple, in both professional & recreational realms. Apple just seems to be literally grasping at every $$$$ they can squeeze out of the customer these days...

Q-6
 
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rigormortis

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Jun 11, 2009
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i spilled water on my macbook air. i also was charged almost $1000 to replace the battery. but i had square trade. and it wasn't even apple that fixed that air. it was another service provider. so apple might not be automatically charging you just based on the stickers

have you tried running apple diagnostics with the power adapter plugged in?

when water got into my mac book air, the battery would show 0% and it would not charge. and removing the power adapter shut the computer down hard, i shipped it to square trade's mac repair company, and it came back with a new battery and logic board and its warranty was pretty depleted
 

lcseds

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Jun 20, 2006
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As mentioned, that's probably a system board replacement and battery. Likely the charging circuit has failed. Motherboard, top case would run $1K easy.
 

dwfaust

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Jul 3, 2011
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So much for 'truth in advertising'. The click bait thread title is clearly misleading... where's Paul Harvey when you need him? (Now we know 'the rest of the story'.)
 
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garirry

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Apr 27, 2013
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I don't want to quote all the replies, but the laptop works fine including when running on battey.

It's telling her to replace the battery because the laptop exceeded the battery's maximum cycle count.
https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201585
Yes, but this most likely means that there are other problems (maybe on an internal level only) with your computer. You claimed that the logic board was manually repaired. I think that's good enough of a reason why Apple doesn't want to risk it and they just want to replace it along with the battery. Either change the battery yourself if you're capable of that, or just buy a new (or used, for that matter) computer. It's not worth it to pay $1250 for this.
 

tubeexperience

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Original poster
Feb 17, 2016
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Yes, but this most likely means that there are other problems (maybe on an internal level only) with your computer. You claimed that the logic board was manually repaired. I think that's good enough of a reason why Apple doesn't want to risk it and they just want to replace it along with the battery. Either change the battery yourself if you're capable of that, or just buy a new (or used, for that matter) computer. It's not worth it to pay $1250 for this.

The laptop has been working for the past 3 years so the logic board is not the issue.

Also, the battery is glued to the top case, so it's not like I can just easily lifted it out.
 

Count Blah

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Jan 6, 2004
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Simple solution is not to buy computers with all glued in components.

That is what I've done with Apple. I hope my 2012 15" cMBP lasts many years to come.

Ipads and phones are a different story, obviously.
 

Queen6

macrumors G3
Simple solution is not to buy computers with all glued in components.

That is what I've done with Apple. I hope my 2012 15" cMBP lasts many years to come.

Ipads and phones are a different story, obviously.

Unfortunately it`s going that way, equally I rather object to Apple`s restrictive practices. Apple could easily replace the battery in the OP`s system, under waiver to protect against any liability, equally Apple won't likely do this, preferring, rather holding people to ransom $1250 or a new machine, of course the major benefactor is naturally Apple...

The price of Mac`s does not intimidate, an equally specified Windows system can easily be the same if not more. I just find my BS meter, tripping more & more. Apple`s last bastion is it`s stores, customer service, not that I find it stellar, just that the Windows OEM`s are so completely tragic in this respect, it`s hardly difficult for Apple to excel.

In all honesty gluing batteries into, dare I say professional/prosumer grade notebooks is just a crap idea, plain & simple. Apple is simply monopolising in the name of design...

Q-6
 
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Dunbar

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Jun 25, 2010
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Los Angeles, CA
I like Apple when it comes to service/replacement of their products (usually more than fair) but in this case I would have a 3rd party vendor replace the battery in a heartbeat. Or keep using it the battery life seems fine. I don't know if there's some way to get rid of the battery replacement message w/o replacing the battery.
 

tubeexperience

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Feb 17, 2016
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I like Apple when it comes to service/replacement of their products (usually more than fair) but in this case I would have a 3rd party vendor replace the battery in a heartbeat. Or keep using it the battery life seems fine. I don't know if there's some way to get rid of the battery replacement message w/o replacing the battery.

I've changed the battery on the Retina before. It requires a complete disassembly.

I used a hair dryer to heat up the battery, then used a plastic ruler to wedge between the battery and the top case and cut through the adhesive.

It's definitely a time-waster.
 

maflynn

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Traverse

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Easy answer the liquid intrusion detectors are likely triggered, so Apple will want to replace the majority of the boards.

This is it. Even if the computer runs fine, the detectors have been triggered and Apple doesn't want to fix a battery and then the whole thing fail and you get a free fix from them. That disclosure thing sounds like a good idea though.
 

tubeexperience

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Feb 17, 2016
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I'm betting, that something is kicking out on Apple's test.

I guess we're all guessing that its a logic board, but did you ask them specifics of why its 1250?

I don't know. My sister brought it in and she isn't exactly the most tech savvy person.
 

tubeexperience

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Feb 17, 2016
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I guess it wasn't such a good deal then. :rolleyes: A computer with liquid damage is a figurative time bomb.

What are you talking about? The logic board has already been repaired and the laptop has been working for the last 3 years.

It needs a new battery because it's over the battery's maximum cycle count
 
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MacInTO

macrumors 65816
Apr 25, 2005
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Canada, eh!
Apple probably has a policy not to work on machines with signs of liquid damage to protect themselves should they replace the battery and then have the machine malfunction.

Why don't you replace it yourself? You can get retina Macbook batteries on eBay.
 

brewmonkey

macrumors regular
Feb 17, 2016
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Maybe a third-party repair shop would be willing to replace just the battery for a reasonable fee (as others have suggested). I'd personally try to go that route.

Interesting about the liquid indicators inside the Mac...never knew about that. Learn something new every day...
 
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