Apple Working to Transform HealthKit Into Diagnosis Tool Aided by New Apple Watch Apps

Zirel

Suspended
Jul 24, 2015
2,201
2,985
Rather than presenting all the information I need (and only that information) in one place, it is now in multiple sections (so I cannot see all the data easily at once). Rather than using the space on the dashboard for my information, they are using it for pretty pictures. That is not an improvement.
It was previously in multiple sections as well.

And you still have the "dashboard" on the today tab.
 

SandboxGeneral

Moderator emeritus
Sep 8, 2010
24,965
7,905
Detroit
Something that I'd like to see Apple incorporate into the Health app would be actual, native, nutrition tracking. I don't understand why not doing this already and making it so we have to rely on a third-party app to supply the data. I see I can enter some stuff directly, like vitamins and such, but no food stuffs.

The Fitbit app does almost everything I could want except macro-nutrient breakdowns and integration into the Apple Health app.
 
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Dave00

macrumors 6502a
Dec 2, 2003
853
60
Pittsburgh
Having actually worked on developing healthcare systems, I can tell you that there are a couple that really do dominate the landscape when it comes to healthcare records, and most existing apps that work on collecting data (for example, from internal pacemakers) support exporting to those systems. It's probably easier to transfer your data from one provider to another than it is to switch from iPhone to Android.
It's really not, though. If you're in Epic, then yes, you're a big enough gorilla that most ancillary systems have to be able to export. But one of the real fails with "meaningful use" was that interoperability was not required until long after implementation, and the few standards that exist (HL7, ugh) are downright horrible. Even transferring information within a health system is often a nightmare, as each EHR has its own data structure. It's extremely frustrating when information is entered in a structured format at one entity, and then it has to be transferred as a text file, and at the other end you have to manually enter things back in a structured format.

It's an area that's ripe for a game changer however. There's just so much low-hanging fruit. For instance, when ordering a lab, on my side it prints out the associated codes, and a tube of blood is hand-labeled. The stack of printed orders and tubes of blood are then taken to the lab, where a technician matches the printed papers to tubes, then re-enters the patient data and testing codes at the EHR on their end. What would make immensely more sense would be for the codes to be sent electronically, with an identifying label printed out on my end. Same thing happens with imaging, with orders and codes printed out on my end, then the radiology department determines that you can't use that code with that order, and phone calls back and forth ensue. A smart system could determine the right code at the outset, which would be transmitted electronically. None of this usually happens because the systems won't talk to each other.

Dave
 
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honglong1976

macrumors 65816
Jul 12, 2008
1,168
713
UK
Rather than presenting all the information I need (and only that information) in one place, it is now in multiple sections (so I cannot see all the data easily at once). Rather than using the space on the dashboard for my information, they are using it for pretty pictures. That is not an improvement.
Agreed! The old one was better! The new one feels like a confusing, poorly designed mess.
[doublepost=1475056968][/doublepost]Automatic sleep tracking is a must. There is plenty of battery to do it.

I can use my watch for 2 days without charging (as long as no activity is tracked, running, cycling, etc).
 

diipii

macrumors 6502a
Dec 6, 2012
605
535
UK
I've always loved the idea. Bulk health data collecting will be a boon to understanding our bodies and help in identifying causes of illnesses in so many ways.

I think the biggest opponent for collecting health data would be the insurance industry. They'll tell you up and down its about privacy, but they just want to keep that industry as big as clustersfu*ck as possible. The more confusion, the less peopLe know, the better in keeping their shady industry in the shade.
Wrong. The information will be sold to people who want to sell you stuff.
 

Rhonindk

macrumors 68040
Oct 3, 2014
3,765
7,347
watching the birth of the Dem WTH Party
I've always loved the idea. Bulk health data collecting will be a boon to understanding our bodies and help in identifying causes of illnesses in so many ways.

I think the biggest opponent for collecting health data would be the insurance industry. They'll tell you up and down its about privacy, but they just want to keep that industry as big as clustersfu*ck as possible. The more confusion, the less peopLe know, the better in keeping their shady industry in the shade.
The biggest opponent will be the companies that are trying to lock in health record maintenance at medical facilities. They want the "you have to work with us and do it our way" control they currently have.
Insurance companies? I suspect they are ambivalent about the issue.
My biggest concern and why I think this is the wrong method is privacy. From the oops and the hacks and the general "it's good enough".
[doublepost=1475068397][/doublepost]
This is probably a big reason why Apple is taking data security so seriously.
Snicker :D
You forgot the "/s".
[doublepost=1475069143][/doublepost]
It's really not, though. If you're in Epic, then yes, you're a big enough gorilla that most ancillary systems have to be able to export. But one of the real fails with "meaningful use" was that interoperability was not required until long after implementation, and the few standards that exist (HL7, ugh) are downright horrible. Even transferring information within a health system is often a nightmare, as each EHR has its own data structure. It's extremely frustrating when information is entered in a structured format at one entity, and then it has to be transferred as a text file, and at the other end you have to manually enter things back in a structured format.

It's an area that's ripe for a game changer however. There's just so much low-hanging fruit. For instance, when ordering a lab, on my side it prints out the associated codes, and a tube of blood is hand-labeled. The stack of printed orders and tubes of blood are then taken to the lab, where a technician matches the printed papers to tubes, then re-enters the patient data and testing codes at the EHR on their end. What would make immensely more sense would be for the codes to be sent electronically, with an identifying label printed out on my end. Same thing happens with imaging, with orders and codes printed out on my end, then the radiology department determines that you can't use that code with that order, and phone calls back and forth ensue. A smart system could determine the right code at the outset, which would be transmitted electronically. None of this usually happens because the systems won't talk to each other.

Dave
The current number one deliberate impediment.
 
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rp2011

macrumors 65816
Oct 12, 2010
1,268
905
Wrong. The information will be sold to people who want to sell you stuff.
The big news yesterday was that Apple was teaming with a health care company, so my narrative is obviously wrong. (Unless the choose not to share with researchers)
But health data collection needs to be done and out there to the public. Of course data needs to be released patient anonymous. But in this age of machine learning that data would be a godsend.

And it should be released free of charge so that more researchers can sift through the data instead of just big money.
[doublepost=1475069456][/doublepost]
Wrong. The information will be sold to people who want to sell you stuff.
Which is good.