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Keirasplace

macrumors 601
Aug 6, 2014
4,059
1,278
Montreal
Examples of Apple "cheating" buying a supplier that sells to everyone the parts then taking them off the table for everyone forcing them to scramble to find new one if possible.
Total sells of the parts might even drop. They just want to remove it from others.

I would not of been surprised if they got ARM in hopes of cutting that tech off from others.
One thing to invent new item. It is another to take away an item or offer token that everyone can have it (just pay our overly prices fees)

Making something different from everyone, which cannot be copied, is the goal of any business that wants healthy profit margins. Buying off the shelf stuff (if they had not bought Authentec and left anyone else use it), means your product is exactly the same as every one else. That's why they bought it, insuring separation.

Cisco has bought hundreds of companies, Intel has also bought dozens of companies, same thing with Microsoft, Google, etc. Buying companies with new technologies is routinely done by everyone. Small companies selling to big ones has been the norm in every industry for 200 years.

Why? Because of the risk/return of startups. Out of 100 startups, maybe 10 will be successful enough to be sold. Big companies don'T want to take this huge risk of having 90 failures. Their business is not investment banking.

They let the market itself triage the good tech, and then when they're still not mainstream (or just becoming mainstream), they buy them out.

Why? Capitalism. People in those small companies want the money. They are not interested in remaining pure and making 100K a year, or wait 5 more years to possibly sell for more. The tech field is fickle, especially in narrow areas like biometrics. Who knows what could exist in 5 years. So, you take your money while you can.

The added money by being bought also helps develop the technology further and bring it to the mainstream (this is what has happened with Apple).

Do people think Authentec is running a charity? They don't owe anything to anybody. If Samsung had bought this company and put it in their Galaxy phones, pretty sure no Android fan here would be offended by that; no sir.
 

QuarterSwede

macrumors G3
Oct 1, 2005
9,794
2,058
Colorado Springs, CO
It's curious to me how much the fingerprint feature has been downplayed by the Android world. I just upgraded to a 6 a couple months ago after 3 years with an iPhone 4S and I'm at that point where I don't know how I got by without the fingerprint sensor. The ability to unlock the phone that way alone is hands-down my favorite feature. It would be hard to switch to anything without it now.
This. It's so incredibly useful that you take it for granted soon after getting a device that uses it.
 

linuxcooldude

macrumors 68020
Mar 1, 2010
2,480
7,232
the difference is the fingerprint readers that are used commercially are much more accurate than the crap apple dumps into the phones.

that phone sensor only looks for a few matching resemblances in a fingerprint where commercial ones look for exact matches in several patterns.

Not...my company also uses a finger print scanner. The first one was not very good. The second a much improved model but still quirky. With some individuals it still fails to read properly so they cannot use it and have to login manually with a numbered code.
 

ghettochris

macrumors 6502a
Feb 19, 2008
773
0
It's curious to me how much the fingerprint feature has been downplayed by the Android world. I just upgraded to a 6 a couple months ago after 3 years with an iPhone 4S and I'm at that point where I don't know how I got by without the fingerprint sensor. The ability to unlock the phone that way alone is hands-down my favorite feature. It would be hard to switch to anything without it now.

I love touch ID also, I expected it to enable me to use a password where I didn't before because the hassle, I did not expect it to basically kill the swipe to unlock screen, making that seem like such a hassle.
 

Lancer

macrumors 68020
Jul 22, 2002
2,217
147
Australia
Why would they put it on the back, Apple did the right thing and put it on the front built in to the button. Really wish they would also put on one the Apple laptops and maybe find a way to put it on the iMac.
 

pickaxe

macrumors 6502a
Nov 29, 2012
760
284
Why does MacRumors keep using words meant to provoke?

It's the correct term. Apple saw what Motorola's design plans were and bought AuthenTec before they could go with it. They then proceeded to implement it in their own designs.

I'm sorry that this does not fit your worldview, in which Apple has apparently invented biometric sensors in mobile phones.
 

Michael Goff

Suspended
Jul 5, 2012
13,329
7,421
Why would they put it on the back, Apple did the right thing and put it on the front built in to the button. Really wish they would also put on one the Apple laptops and maybe find a way to put it on the iMac.

Likely because Android phones are typically a battle to the land of no bezel. Why do you think the 6+ is almost as big as a Nexus 6? That sensor takes up space on the bottom, then symmetry adds it to the top.
 

Abazigal

Contributor
Jul 18, 2011
19,839
22,541
Singapore
This strikes me as Apple's main competitive advantage moving forward - creating integrated features that work great together, don't really play well with other brands, and which will be extremely difficult for the competition to replicate.

For example, Apple Pay is integrated at the OS level, uses a fingerprint sensor for authentication, coupled with a secure enclave in a custom A7 processor for added security. Very few companies can exert enough control over both the hardware and software to get a similar effect.

Continuity and handoff let your devices communicate more seamlessly with one another, but only if they are all Apple devices. Tying all services together with icloud. I should be irritated, but darn, I have 5 Apple devices, and they really do work well together...:cool:
 

bbeagle

macrumors 68040
Oct 19, 2010
3,542
2,982
Buffalo, NY
It's the correct term. Apple saw what Motorola's design plans were and bought AuthenTec before they could go with it. They then proceeded to implement it in their own designs.

I'm sorry that this does not fit your worldview, in which Apple has apparently invented biometric sensors in mobile phones.

The article MacRumors linked to used the word 'BOUGHT'. That is the correct term. MacRumors changed it to a loaded word - 'POACHED'. That's the truth.

It has nothing to do with who was 'first' or who 'invented' anything.
 

sumsingwong

macrumors 6502a
Dec 15, 2012
771
368
Motorola had their chance with the Atrix. It was a bad implementation. Now that Apple did it the right way, all of a sudden, it's Apples fault. Boo hoo! Authentec was up for grabs but nobody wanted to acquire them. As soon as Apple acquired them and used the tech correctly, now everyone wants them.
 

gotluck

macrumors 603
Dec 8, 2011
5,714
1,204
East Central Florida
Motorola had their chance with the Atrix. It was a bad implementation. Now that Apple did it the right way, all of a sudden, it's Apples fault. Boo hoo! Authentec was up for grabs but nobody wanted to acquire them. As soon as Apple acquired them and used the tech correctly, now everyone wants them.

im sure the quality of the sensor was quite different back then, but you have no quarrel from me
 

giantfan1224

macrumors 6502a
Mar 9, 2012
870
1,115
I love the Touch ID on my iPhone. It's to the point where if I have to enter a password at any point it's irritating. I love apps like Amazon and American Express that have integrated its use where you don't have to manually enter a password and don't have to worry about someone gaining access through a save password. Apple Pay works very well. Someone mentioned how Android has underestimated the fingerprint ID technology well I underestimated it for sure until I started using it.
 

newyorkone

macrumors 6502
Jun 10, 2009
276
250
The EX-Motorola CEO should stop whining and being a baby by making excuses and blaming others for why something didn't make it into a finished product he was responsible for. Blame yourself.
 
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MacModMachine

macrumors 68020
Apr 3, 2009
2,476
392
Canada
Not...my company also uses a finger print scanner. The first one was not very good. The second a much improved model but still quirky. With some individuals it still fails to read properly so they cannot use it and have to login manually with a numbered code.

your wrong , im in the feild.

i have used more fingerprint readers than you ever have seen.
 
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mi7chy

macrumors G4
Oct 24, 2014
10,495
11,155
Still prefer a pattern since it's much quicker to unlock and is legally protected unlike a fingerprint that the court can force you to give up. On a side note, our company evaluated Authentec USB fingerprint readers around 2007 and rejected them.
 

Keirasplace

macrumors 601
Aug 6, 2014
4,059
1,278
Montreal
your wrong , im in the feild.

i have used more fingerprint readers than you ever have seen.

Right, so you've followed that person, and me, for the last 16 years; and your affirmation somehow weirdly trumps my lived reality? Unless you lived my life and put your fingers on the sensors when they didn't work, as I and others I know, did for 15 years, I don't know what the hell your saying!

You don't need to be building those things to know they failed, just use them a lot.
 

Rennir

macrumors 6502
Jan 13, 2012
457
0
It's curious to me how much the fingerprint feature has been downplayed by the Android world. I just upgraded to a 6 a couple months ago after 3 years with an iPhone 4S and I'm at that point where I don't know how I got by without the fingerprint sensor. The ability to unlock the phone that way alone is hands-down my favorite feature. It would be hard to switch to anything without it now.

It's the same as how many Samsung/HTC/Motorola specific features are downplayed by Apple fans. It's a natural phenomenon in my opinion; nothing to be curious about. If you've never used the technology, you probably wouldn't be aware of what you're potentially missing out on.
 

nia820

macrumors 68020
Jun 27, 2011
2,131
1,980
It's the same as how many Samsung/HTC/Motorola specific features are downplayed by Apple fans. It's a natural phenomenon in my opinion; nothing to be curious about. If you've never used the technology, you probably wouldn't be aware of what you're potentially missing out on.

Agreed! You can't miss what you never had. This is what apple/samsung fanatics fail to understand.
 

coolspot18

macrumors 65816
Aug 16, 2010
1,052
90
Canada
Very wise move by Apple. One of their best decisions in recent years.

Touch ID is a bit limited in the sense that the prints are not shared across devices - so you can't have a common login across all your iDevices. Also, the prints are not multi-channel so you cannot authenticate yourself when you call into a call centre or through a web site (yet). Touch ID isn't multi-platform. Organizations (i.e. your bank) are relying on the hardware itself to do the authentication - that's a lot of faith to put into Apple.

Touch ID is cool, opens up a lot of possibilities, but ultimate adoption may eventually be limited to certain use cases.
 

Keirasplace

macrumors 601
Aug 6, 2014
4,059
1,278
Montreal
Touch ID is a bit limited in the sense that the prints are not shared across devices - so you can't have a common login across all your iDevices. Also, the prints are not multi-channel so you cannot authenticate yourself when you call into a call centre or through a web site (yet). Touch ID isn't multi-platform. Organizations (i.e. your bank) are relying on the hardware itself to do the authentication - that's a lot of faith to put into Apple.

Touch ID is cool, opens up a lot of possibilities, but ultimate adoption may eventually be limited to certain use cases.

The problem with sharing across devices is perception (if the print info (not even the real prints) stays on the device, people don't feel angst about it. Even if people didn't have this anxiety, there major issues right now in distributing this with absolute security and then storing it at the end-points. Not an easy problem for sure, but not insurmountable.

As for faith in Apple, well Banks probably would rather put their faith in that company than in just about any other. Its reputation is on the line after all, and that's a powerful motivation for a company to do the right thing.
 

MacModMachine

macrumors 68020
Apr 3, 2009
2,476
392
Canada
Right, so you've followed that person, and me, for the last 16 years; and your affirmation somehow weirdly trumps my lived reality? Unless you lived my life and put your fingers on the sensors when they didn't work, as I and others I know, did for 15 years, I don't know what the hell your saying!

You don't need to be building those things to know they failed, just use them a lot.

or just not know how to use them in the first place.


typical user.
 

linuxcooldude

macrumors 68020
Mar 1, 2010
2,480
7,232
or just not know how to use them in the first place.


typical user.

More like typical company, blame the user for failure of its product. As you can see I'm not the only one who has problems with commercial fingerprint scanners.

Ease of use, as well as security is important to customers.

Touch ID is a bit limited in the sense that the prints are not shared across devices - so you can't have a common login across all your iDevices.

I don't think you would want to share prints between different devices. To me that would hamper security.

Touch ID isn't multi-platform. Organizations (i.e. your bank) are relying on the hardware itself to do the authentication - that's a lot of faith to put into Apple.

Thats the whole idea, to limit your prints to only be accessed by your iPhone and not through the cloud which is more easily hacked.
 
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OhHaiThere

macrumors regular
Sep 8, 2011
143
0
USA
Thats the whole idea, to limit your prints to only be accessed by your iPhone and not through the cloud which is more easily hacked.

I think you've missed the point entirely. With a personal device, your device just has to quickly identify a pattern which matches the stored pattern. The only pattern the phone cares about is yours and it has to be within some margin of error.

Now you look at an organization where you have to potentially match thousands of patterns to identify someone, it becomes a little more complicating and security is tighter in those cases.

Ever heard of the Security, Functionality, Usability triangle? For example, that's why the routers you buy implement WPA2 Personal, while companies will rely on WPA2 Enterprise.
 
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