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Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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Apple's battery health management feature cannot be disabled on Apple Silicon Macs, as there is no toggle switch for this in System Preferences on these machines.

apple-battery-health-management-big-sur.jpg
Battery health management cannot be disabled on Apple Silicon-based Macs

Introduced in macOS Catalina version 10.15.5, the battery health management system is designed to improve the lifespan of a Mac notebook's battery by reducing the rate at which it chemically ages. The feature achieves this by monitoring the battery's temperature history and its charging patterns, and temporarily reducing the battery's maximum charging capacity as necessary, according to Apple.

The feature can still be disabled on Intel-based Macs, but Apple warns this may reduce the battery's lifespan. On macOS Big Sur, navigate to System Preferences > Battery > Battery > Battery Health… and uncheck "Manage battery longevity." On macOS Catalina, the checkbox is located in System Preferences > Energy Saver > Battery Health…

apple-battery-health-management-big-sur-intel.jpg
Battery health management can be disabled on Intel-based Macs

As further confirmation, Apple has shared a new support document about battery health management on Apple Silicon Macs, and unlike the version of the document for Intel-based Macs, there is no section on turning off the feature.

Article Link: Apple's Battery Health Management Feature Cannot Be Disabled on Apple Silicon Macs
 

Natzoo

macrumors 68000
Sep 16, 2014
1,907
563
Given how many time I've had to send a fat, swollen laptop in for repair, maybe this is a good thing.
I thought so too however it means that full charge capacity is being weakened and you have no control over it. Just another apple 'feature' I guess where you cannot even control your battery. I don't want it to be artificially lowered, just limit full charging to 80%. Sometimes I am out for a whole day or days where I could use 100% of my battery.
 

Natzoo

macrumors 68000
Sep 16, 2014
1,907
563
knowing these forums I expect there will be complaining
I think the complaints are coming from the lack of control, think about it, you don't even control your own battery now. It is now a permanent rental device and while the battery life is great on the M1 chip, what about down the road where it's artificially limited to 75-80% charge capacity (on intel chips, the battery service would pop up and disappear once management was turned off).
 

rgbrock1

Suspended
Feb 1, 2016
428
700
SC
Well, can't imagine anyone would argue with having to keep it on.
I'd argue it. The small utility called AlDente does a much better job at prolonging battery life by allowing the user to set a maximum charge percentage before battery charging stops. I set mine at 50% max and keep my 2020 13" MBP plugged in all the time. If I know I'll be on the go then a simple click to 100% and I'm good to go.
 

Astralis56

macrumors newbie
Nov 16, 2020
17
68
Does anybody know if this feature impacts performance on Mac laptop when connected to power or it is only when on battery?
 

NT1440

Contributor
May 18, 2008
12,830
16,699
I think the complaints are coming from the lack of control, think about it, you don't even control your own battery now. It is now a permanent rental device and while the battery life is great on the M1 chip, what about down the road where it's artificially limited to 75-80% charge capacity (on intel chips, the battery service would pop up and disappear once management was turned off).
...so you just want the “control” of destroying your battery’s lifespan for reasons I suppose?

This results in a longer viable lifetime of the device before you have to shell out for a battery replacement service or replace the machine. I don’t understand how a site full of “planned obsolescence” posts complains about a longer lasting Mac at the same time.
 

acidblood

macrumors regular
Oct 6, 2006
117
245
People don't get it. The complaint is not because one would want to disable the feature. It's because one should be free to decide whether to disable the feature or not.

It's your computer. You paid very, very handsomely for it. You're supposed to be able to do what you want to it.

Well, I guess lots of people here would be just delighted to be at the other end of a Darth Vader-style "I am altering the deal, pray I don't alter it any further" speech.

PS: I use the AlDente app, and I manage my battery infinitely better than any crappy machine-learning-AI mumbo-jumbo would ever be able to. So, I do disable it. I wouldn't recommend this to 99.99% of other Apple users, though.
 

NT1440

Contributor
May 18, 2008
12,830
16,699
I'd argue it. The small utility called AlDente does a much better job at prolonging battery life by allowing the user to set a maximum charge percentage before battery charging stops. I set mine at 50% max and keep my 2020 13" MBP plugged in all the time. If I know I'll be on the go then a simple click to 100% and I'm good to go.
Congratulations, you’re a “power user” who has the technical know how to do basic upkeep on your computer.

Now about the other 98% of the population of Mac owners, why should they have to take these manual steps when Apple has automatically lengthened the lifespan of their device?
 

acidblood

macrumors regular
Oct 6, 2006
117
245
...so you just want the “control” of destroying your battery’s lifespan for reasons I suppose?

This results in a longer viable lifetime of the device before you have to shell out for a battery replacement service or replace the machine. I don’t understand how a site full of “planned obsolescence” posts complains about a longer lasting Mac at the same time.
No, we want the control of doing a much better job using, e.g., the AlDente app.

And yeah, the computer is mine, if I wanted to destroy the battery lifespan, should I be restricted from doing so if that's my clear intent for some reason? If I would like to set fire to it or throw it out of a 100-story building, should I be restricted from doing so as well?
 
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stringParameter

macrumors member
Sep 22, 2020
52
202
ThinkPads have had something like this for years and I always have mine max at 80% since most of the time it’s plugged in.

Apple is just doing an automated version of that, since they know people won’t know (or even be aware) about battery health. Personally I don’t see a problem with this.
 

acidblood

macrumors regular
Oct 6, 2006
117
245
Congratulations, you’re a “power user” who has the technical know how to do basic upkeep on your computer.

Now about the other 98% of the population of Mac owners, why should they have to take these manual steps when Apple has automatically lengthened the lifespan of their device?
Nobody is asking Apple to disable the feature.

Just leave a checkbox there so the power users can disable it. The checkbox can be checked by default. Everybody gets it, and those who can do better are allowed to disable it. What's wrong with that?
 

waveman

macrumors regular
Jul 23, 2015
126
66
I wonder if this is just temporary, or if it’s an intentional change.

I can’t see it being permanent, as you can disable it on iOS, I believe.
You will never see anything unintentional from Apple - they'll control our behavior as they please. In this case, they might be just gathering statistics about the new processor and how it performs along with the battery life etc. If they need it, they'll force as to comply one way or another. As always.
 
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