Are more expensive appliances more reliable?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by senseless, Sep 29, 2013.

  1. senseless macrumors 68000

    senseless

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    #1
    In the same brand family, will a $1000 dishwasher use better quality internal components than a $600 dishwasher? Can it be expected to last longer? (generally speaking)
     
  2. Carlanga macrumors 604

    Carlanga

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    #2
    many brands have different categories to get different buyers... so it's a possibility the more expensive one is better made and might have better materials. It's all relative to what you want to buy.
     
  3. stiligFox macrumors 6502a

    stiligFox

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    #3
    In the same brand family? Generally, but there are exceptions I would imagine.

    If you are looking at appliances to get though, I highly recommend anything made by Miele. I have appliances from them that are going like new a decade later.
     
  4. velocityg4 macrumors 68040

    velocityg4

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    #4
    If they have roughly the same features I would expect the more expensive one to last longer. Say going from a residential to a commercial unit. However, if all they have done is overloaded it with useless features that's just more parts that can break. Meaning you may actually be increasing the chances of failure.

    I'd look more into whether it has higher horse power or amperage rated motors. Is the latch mechanism solid metal or flimsy plastic? That sort of thing. I'd ignore features like steam and fifty different cycles that's just more stuff which can fail that you likely won't use.

    Manufacturers usually have different lines. So if the $1000 model is the introductory model to a premier line. Then it likely has a better build quality than the top end $1000 model of a lower quality line.

    Also don't get those hidden button models. They are a pain since you don't know if it is running (if quiet), waiting for you to press something or finished.

    But yes I do generally try to buy the top end appliances I can afford. Since they are usually more reliable. If you focus on build quality. I also buy used or refurbished to save money most of the time. Why not get top of the line used for the price of middle quality new?
     
  5. senseless thread starter macrumors 68000

    senseless

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    #5
    Yes, I managed to pick up a 5 year old stainless steel gas range from a friend, but I'm looking to replace the dishwasher, refrigerator and undercounter microwave with stainless also. (I'm renovating a circa 1970 kitchen)
     
  6. TSE macrumors 68030

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    #6
    My family has always bought American appliances which only lasted 5 years.

    This go around we went a little pricey and bought a Bosch. We are never going back. Germans are still masterminds of engineering.
     
  7. AutoUnion39, Sep 29, 2013
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2013

    AutoUnion39 macrumors 601

    AutoUnion39

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    #7
    I think it depends on the brand. GE makes some fantastic high-end stuff and it's equivalent to the Asian/Euro brands. I live in an apartment, so I've never bought appliances, so I'm basing this off my parent's home.

    It's about 20 years old and they had the same Whirlpool appliances up until about 5-6 years ago in the kitchen. Nothing ever went wrong. I think they were pretty "low-end" models too. Nothing special. They were white.

    They ended up replacing them with LG ones (with extended warranties). Progressively, they ALL fell apart. Fridge's motherboard would periodically fry itself. Dishwasher's motor was replaced multiple times. The flat-top stove's heating elements stopped working. Microwave's keypad would periodically die. About 2 years ago, Best Buy agreed to replace all of them under their Black-Tie warranty. They were all switched to high-end Samsung models. Zero issues. They paid slightly more for the better brand and the quality shows.

    They replaced their ancient whirlpool washer/dryer with LG front load units. Zero issues with those, yet their kitchen appliances were all junk.

    After all this, I believe in the fact that you get what you pay for. You can get some bad "high-end" appliances, but the overwhelming facts are that you get a higher quality product. JDPower seems to back this up. Samsung, Electrolux, Bosch, etc are highly rated for reliability and quality.

    Personally, I'd avoid LG and go directly to Samsung, Bosch, Electrolux, etc.

    The owners of my apartment complex upgraded our washer/dryers to high-end Electrolux units about a year ago. They are fantastic. I can get a wash/dry cycle done in about an hour.
     
  8. quagmire macrumors 603

    quagmire

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    #8
    Our kitchenaid dishwasher and standmixer are still going strong.

    The electronic panel went out last year, but that was easily replaced. We got that thing around 2001 I believe. The standmixer is from 1988.
     
  9. ElectronGuru macrumors 65816

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    #9
    I agree, but for a slightly different reason. The more features you add to a device, the less $ each feature gets for engineering and production. If you're going to spend $1000 in a clothes washer, an ugly speed queen will last much longer than anything with LEDs on the front panel. The key is being willing to spend more for what appears to be less. That will put more of the value you are investing, into what matters.
     
  10. Hastings101 macrumors 68000

    Hastings101

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    #10
    Honestly, I've never had a major appliance (refrigerator, washer/dryer, dish washer) that was "unreliable" during its expected life span (5 years at minimum) unless it was my fault. That's just not acceptable in my opinion no matter the price.
     
  11. G51989 macrumors 68030

    G51989

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    #11
    Keep in mind the vast majority of the stuff you'll see in a big box store won't be as well made, and probably won't last as long as those 70s Appliances have.

    And to answer your question, typically more expensive appliances do last longer, however most are built to fail in a few years so you buy another.

    http://www.vikingrange.com/consumer/category/products/kitchen-cleanup

    Not cheap, but will last decades.

    I would not consider Bosch to be a high end, to much plastic. appliance brand. I spent a lot of money redoing my kitchen, several contractors told me that Viking is far and above the best. I went to a Viking retailer, checked out all the stuff I was going to buy, and compared to brands like GE, LG, Samsung, Bosch, stuff like that. The Vikings are built to a MUCH higher standard, and will last much longer.

    http://www.vikingrange.com/consumer/
     
  12. TSE macrumors 68030

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    #12
    We have gone from GE to Whirlpool to Maytag then to Bosch.
     
  13. roadbloc macrumors G3

    roadbloc

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    #13
    Sometimes. But not always. It is always good to research consumer and critic opinions before a purchase.
     
  14. G51989 macrumors 68030

    G51989

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    #14
    What kind of world Is this turning into?! 5 years? Not so long ago appliances easily lasted decades
     
  15. wordoflife macrumors 604

    wordoflife

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    #15
    Not really. All it could be is more complicated set up that is more likely to fail. I'm sure it really depends on individual product vs product. I've seen terrible reviews for some appliances while similar models from the same company had a higher rating.
     
  16. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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    #16
    If you can afford the initial high cost, then I could not agree more, servicing savings will more than make up for it, in the long run.

    I also see this as very good advice, profit from other peoples mistakes, it saves your money in the end.
     
  17. phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

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    #17
    In a nutshell - No.

    Higher price is relative to an item that is lower price. What needs to be mentioned is what are you getting for the higher price. One can get a fridge unit that is 1000 dollars with no bells and whistles that will out last a 2000 dollar fridge with ice-maker, defrost etc. etc. The latter has more things that can go wrong and - of course there are the materials that are used for all those glorious items that sold you on that particular fridge.

    Some have suggested doing your homework and getting some reviews under the belt before making a purchase. I think this is a very wise thing to do. Also, as some mentioned, it seems there is a trend to make items that don't last as long as say similar items from a couple of decades ago. This is a sad way we live in knowing everything will either be obsolete or breaks down in a matter of just a few years.

    Vacuum cleaners are now all plastic and even the most expensive ones seem to break rather quickly. Miele is perhaps an exception while Dyson seems to have lots of refurbs on the market even if their share of the market is not the largest.

    In short, get reviews of appliances first. They may not be perfect in predicting how long your item may last but they do give some good information and don't exclude reviews by those that have purchased the products. - For the latter, just be aware some will rave about the product simply because they want to believe in their expensive purchase and others will blast a product with negative reviews because they didn't get what they wanted or they didn't have enough sense to read the manual to fully exploit their appliance properly.

    Good research and shopping to you if you are planning a major appliance purchase. ... And as my late grandfather used to say (paraphrase) "I'm too poor to afford cheap." (meaning if you by inexpensive or poorly made, it will cost you more later)
     
  18. AustinIllini macrumors demi-god

    AustinIllini

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    #18
    Whirlpool destroyed Maytag after that buyout. Old Maytags last forever, new Maytags are horse manure.

    LG washer/driers are amazing. Wife one of those two layer oven ranges, so we got the GE (the thing we have the most problems with). Kenmore fridge and dishwasher.
     
  19. Hastings101 macrumors 68000

    Hastings101

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    #19
    I've only had my *own* appliances for about seven or eight years so I'm not the most reliable source on this :p. I was just always told by my grandparents that after five years I'd better start saving to replace because it's all luck after that point lol.
     
  20. Mr Kram macrumors 68000

    Mr Kram

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    #20
    mechanical parts of appliances still have great longevity. the issue is that now most appliances have some sort of computer circuitry to control all the fancy features. more likely than not, these are the parts need to be replaced.

    and going back to the original question, usually, more expensive products are built with better materials. specifically for the dishwasher, a big cost is what type of tub is used. high end models will always have stainless steel tubs while lower end models are probably plastic. also note that sometimes you are paying for warranty. you can buy the exact same product with a 3, 5 or 7 year warranty. each one will be priced accordingly.
     
  21. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    #21
    Also check the warranty periods. Standard is 1 to 2 years of course. But, as just one example... Bosch warranties certain dishwasher parts beyond the standard 1 year - up to 'lifetime' in the case of the tub. Kenmore seems to have a straight up 1 year warranty. (I just randomly picked those two makers to compare warranties, and I am making no claims about the quality of either's goods).

    I would argue that given two appliances with similar features, the one with the better warranty is going to last longer. And if it doesn't, then it's probably not going to cost you to fix it.
     
  22. rjkgr macrumors regular

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    #22
    for some yes, but like other things no. it just depends on the company i guess for my opinion
     
  23. G51989 macrumors 68030

    G51989

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    #23
    The last house I had down south before I bought and renovated this one up north was owned by a REALLY REALLY old couple, mid 80s. They never redid the kitchen, though they kept other things up to date. It was full of that classic 50s and 60s Appliances, and ALL of them were still in great working order. Looked brand new to, heavy duty stainless steel everything, with simple controls.

    Over 50 years old at the time, all of it looked and worked like brand new.

    Your typical chinese junk won't last that long ;)
     
  24. phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

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    #24
    I hear you on that! Lots of the older appliances were built to last while most today are built to be obsolescent or break down in a matter of 2-7 years. Rather sad times we live in when the public rewards this mindset by buying those type of products.
     
  25. G51989 macrumors 68030

    G51989

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    #25
    Indeed, the only company as I have stated before that can still match 50s and 60s quality is viking, made in the USA as well.

    http://www.vikingrange.com/consumer/index.jsp

    I took most of the stuff with me when I left, as my newer house is alot bigger and had a big unfinished basement, I used all the old 50s and 60s appliances from my old place, had them shipped up, and used them to be a fully working kitchen behind my man cave/home theater/mid sized bar. Perfect for Jets games ;) All of it still works super well.

    I had to replace a natural gas burner on the old 50s stove, as it was starting to rust out, but it was a cheap part ( 150 dollars, GE still makes them ), took 5 minutes to install and works like new.

    A brand new gas stove typically kicks the bucket after a few years, and cannot be repaired.
     

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